This is Michael Pickart's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Michael Pickart's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Michael Pickart
Interests: running, mountaineering, hiking, movies, sci fi, the New Yorker, my darn job!, ethnic restaurants
Recent Activity
A recent Danish study suggests that you may not need expensive cardiac testing to determine your risks of heart disease. Just look in the mirror. People who look old--with receding hairlines, bald heads, creases near their earlobes, or bumpy deposits... Continue reading
Posted Nov 7, 2012 at Pickart Plastic Surgery Blog
I have previously blogged about my concerns with silicone breast implants manufactured by Poly Implant Prothese (PIP). A quick summary: The French company PIP used industrial-grade silicone in breast implants (rather than medical-grade silicone), thereby increasing the risk of rupture... Continue reading
Posted Feb 10, 2012 at Pickart Plastic Surgery Blog
You may have read recently about safety concerns with French-made PIP silicone breast implants. If you are one of my patients, thankfully, you are not part of this European debacle. I am posting to reassure my patients that I do... Continue reading
Posted Feb 6, 2012 at Pickart Plastic Surgery Blog
Tennis elbow is a painful disorder of the side of the elbow. The medical name is lateral epicondylitis, but both names are incorrect! Tennis elbow is not more common in tennis players, and lateral epicondylitis is not an -itis (an... Continue reading
Posted Jan 8, 2012 at Pickart Plastic Surgery Blog
In 1831, French surgeon Baron Guillaume Dupuytren first described a spontaneous, "deep scarring" disorder of the palmar surfaces of the hands and fingers.... Anatomy The skin of the palmar surfaces of the hands and fingers is special. Like the skin... Continue reading
Posted Jan 3, 2012 at Pickart Plastic Surgery Blog
The most common tumor of the hand is not a cancer. It's a ganglion cyst.... Anatomy Bones meet at joints. Joints are lubricated by synovial fluid. Escape of the fluid is prevented by a joint capsule. Likewise, tendons are lubricated... Continue reading
Posted Dec 30, 2011 at Pickart Plastic Surgery Blog
While trigger fingers involve inflamed flexor tendons (which bring the fingers into the fist) in their digital sheaths, de Quervain's stenosing tenosynovitis refers to inflamed extensor tendons of the thumb (which help you to hitch hike) as they traverse the... Continue reading
Posted Dec 27, 2011 at Pickart Plastic Surgery Blog
A carpal tunnel release is the most common hand surgery that I perform. The second most common is a trigger finger release. A trigger finger (or trigger thumb) involves painful snapping or locking of the fingers or thumb. The medical... Continue reading
Posted Dec 22, 2011 at Pickart Plastic Surgery Blog
Carpal tunnel syndrome is, far and away, the most common nerve compression disorder of the upper extremity. The second most common is cubital tunnel syndrome.... Anatomy The cubital tunnel is... a passageway between... the bony prominence of the inside elbow... Continue reading
Posted Dec 19, 2011 at Pickart Plastic Surgery Blog
Many people are surprised to learn that plastic surgeons are trained to evaluate and to treat hand disorders. Around the USA, about 1/3 of all the hand surgery is performed by plastic surgeons. So, for the next few blog posts,... Continue reading
Posted Dec 13, 2011 at Pickart Plastic Surgery Blog
Image
Before: 48-year-old woman who lost 160 lbs. after bariatric surgery and after becoming an avid cyclist After a tummy tuck. Let's be honest. We have all seen somebody who has had plastic surgery, and whom we can hardly tell whether... Continue reading
Posted Nov 21, 2011 at Pickart Plastic Surgery Blog
Not so sure that I agree, HTY Gold. Certainly, excessive amounts of Botox improperly placed can look strange, but subtle improvement are possible with Botox and Dysport. You might be surprised that even some of your close friends have given Botox a try. It really does work well when properly administered. Michael C. Pickart, M.D., F.A.C.S. Pickart Plastic Surgery, Inc. 1746 S. Victoria Ave., #250, Ventura, CA 93003 (805) 654-8800 | fax (805) 654-8802 To: [email protected]
About 11 months ago, I blogged about that... Botox Dysport ...were about to get more competition from the newest kid on the block, Xeomin. http://www.pickartplasticsurgeryblog.com/2010/08/fda-approves-xeomin-the-3rd-botox.html On August 2, 2010, the FDA approved Xeomin for treatment for cervical dystonia (neck spasms)... Continue reading
Posted Jul 26, 2011 at Pickart Plastic Surgery Blog
Dear Farzana, Since your tummy tuck was just 3 months ago, it is possible that the epigastric fullness is just swelling. My diagnosis is consistent with your description of the fullness as spongy. Swelling can require 6-12 months for full resolution. Please let your plastic surgeon know about your concerns. He may want to photograph the area to confirm its resolution over time. FYI, sometimes patients have excess fat in the epigastrium that is not easily or safely removed during the tummy tuck itself. This fullness may be swelling, but it could also be some of that excess fat. Occasionally, I warn my patients that secondary liposuction is necessary to perfect the tummy tuck--6-12 months later. Please dont be alarmed! Just be aware that minor revision liposuction sometimes aids a result. Congratulations on your otherwise terrific result! Sincerely, Michael C. Pickart, M.D., F.A.C.S. Pickart Plastic Surgery, Inc. 1746 S. Victoria Ave., #250, Ventura, CA 93003 (805) 654-8800 | fax (805) 654-8802 To: [email protected]
Terrific, Farzana! I am glad that you had such a positive experience. Most of my patients are thrilled about their tummy tucks, and unhappy patients are unusual. Congratulations, Michael C. Pickart, M.D., F.A.C.S. Pickart Plastic Surgery, Inc. 1746 S. Victoria Ave., #250, Ventura, CA 93003 (805) 654-8800 | fax (805) 654-8802 To: [email protected]
New research suggests that patients getting regular Botox treatments can eventually reduce wrinkles with half as many sessions. The research, conducted at Oregon Health & Science University, in Portland, sought to determine whether less frequent Botox treatments could provide long-lasting... Continue reading
Posted Jun 30, 2011 at Pickart Plastic Surgery Blog
There has been a lot of hype about stem-cell therapy for facelifting. As a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon, I find those claims comical. Please don't fall victim to clever advertising. However, the biologists have tremendously improved our understanding of cellular... Continue reading
Posted Jun 23, 2011 at Pickart Plastic Surgery Blog
Dear Clara, I recommend using the iopidine drops every 8 hours for no more than 1 week. I am not an ophthalmologist, but I have been told by my eye colleagues that long-term use of iopidine (more than 1 week) can predispose a patient to glaucoma. So, definitely curtail your iopidine use soon. Usually, droopiness (better known as ptosis) lasts just 2-3 weeks, even though the anti-wrinkle effect of Botox and Dysport lasts 3-6 months. I am so sorry that you have had an unexpected outcome. Please remain patient. It will resolve. Promise! Sincerely, Michael C. Pickart, M.D., F.A.C.S. Pickart Plastic Surgery, Inc. 1746 S. Victoria Ave., #250, Ventura, CA 93003 (805) 654-8800 | fax (805) 654-8802 To: [email protected]
Dear Gwen, I am sorry that you have had an unfortunate side effect of treatment with Botulinum Neurotoxin Type-A (BoNT-A) (more commonly known as either Botox or Dysport). Ptosis (or drooping) of the upper eyelid occurs in about 1-3% of BoNT-A treatment sessions. The rate of this complication appears to be about the same for Botox and Dysport, in expert hands. Note that additional phrase in expert hands. Dysport is probably no more likely to cause ptosis than Botox if the health care provider is an expert with the use of Dysport. If he or she is just learning how to use the product, then all bets are off. I have now been using Botox for 5 years and Dysport for 2 years. I have trained other physicians in the use of Dysport. So, I feel confident that I can call myself an expert on both products. I dont think that Dysport truly spreads more than Botox, with my current technique. The only scientific study documenting an increased spread for Dysport relative to Botox examined sweating (which is also minimized by BoNT-A injections) rather than muscle activity, and the study was funded by the makers of Botox (who, of course, would want to discredit their competition). Moreover, in this study, the dilution of the Dysport was much greater than what I currently recommend. Bottom line: Did the Dysport cause the ptosis because...? Dysport is a poor product?Absolutely not!the injector is not an expert with Dysport (even if he/she is good with Botox)?Maybe.the injector used the wrong dilution of Dysport?Maybe.you are unlucky?Most likely. Regardless, you seem fed up with both of the BoNT-As. I certainly would not try to convince you to get a treatment for which you lack confidence. However, I would reassure you that a future Botox/Dysport treatment remains unlikely to cause a repeat ptosis event (97-99%). Also, more BoNT-As are about to be released. Merz Pharma already has FDA approval for Xeomins use for spastic muscle diseases; a cosmetic indication awaits an FDA verdict, which will, almost certainly, be positive. The Mentor Corporation is in clinical trials with Purtox, which also looks promising. So, even if Botox and Dysport are not for you, Xeomin or Purtox might be. Im hoping that youll keep an open mind. Sincerely, Michael C. Pickart, M.D., F.A.C.S. Pickart Plastic Surgery, Inc. 1746 S. Victoria Ave., #250, Ventura, CA 93003 (805) 654-8800 | fax (805) 654-8802 To: [email protected]
Thanks for the testimony! Yes, sunscreen works. Ignore all those comments about looking pasty; pale is healthy! Sorry to have gone political on you. The law is not my specialty. Since public education has failed, I confess that I feel beaten. I just dont know where else to turn other than the Nanny State. Michael C. Pickart, M.D., F.A.C.S. Pickart Plastic Surgery, Inc. 1746 S. Victoria Ave., #250, Ventura, CA 93003 (805) 654-8800 | fax (805) 654-8802 To: [email protected]
According to a new survey from the American Academy of Dermatology, more than 80% of young, white women use tanning beds or intentionally tan in the sun--despite their full cognizance of the deleterious effects of UV light. 3800 white, non-Hispanic... Continue reading
Posted May 6, 2011 at Pickart Plastic Surgery Blog
Dear Angie, These post-operative muscle spasms are normal for 1-4 weeks. Please call your Board Certified Plastic Surgeon. He should be able to allay your anxieties. I frequently prescribe Valium for muscle spasms; ask him whether Valium would be right for you. Sincerely, Michael C. Pickart, M.D., F.A.C.S. Pickart Plastic Surgery, Inc. 1746 S. Victoria Ave., #250, Ventura, CA 93003 (805) 654-8800 | fax (805) 654-8802 To: [email protected]
Late last week, an FDA-advisory panel overwhelmingly voted to recommend approval for Restylane's use as a lip enhancer. While the whole FDA still needs to make a final decision, they typically accede to the advisory panel. Of course, using Restylane... Continue reading
Posted May 2, 2011 at Pickart Plastic Surgery Blog
Dear Rookshire, Yes, I have had patients like you who have had prolonged swelling. On occasion, the swelling required months of patience. Very frustrating for patient (and surgeon). My suggestions: Head elevation: Use an extra pillow at night Cold compresses Massage Lots and lots of patience Good luck! I bet that all will be well when it ends well. Sincerely, Michael C. Pickart, M.D., F.A.C.S. Pickart Plastic Surgery, Inc. 1746 S. Victoria Ave., #250, Ventura, CA 93003 (805) 654-8800 | fax (805) 654-8802 To: [email protected]
Maybe. According the IRS, if you itemize your deductions on Form 1040, Schedule A, you may be able to deduct expenses you paid that year for medical care for yourself, your spouse, and your dependents. Specifically, you may deduct the... Continue reading
Posted Apr 13, 2011 at Pickart Plastic Surgery Blog