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National Geographic Staff
Recent Activity
National Geographic Staff has shared their blog NGM Blog Central
Oct 24, 2011
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I have been assigned the task of researching and compiling our forthcoming map of Cuba. During the early stages of my research, I hit the cartographic jackpot—the possibility of two new provinces forming in 2011. Not only were we going... Continue reading
Posted May 11, 2011 at NGM Blog Central
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NG Maps The "War on Terror" is inextricably linked to place. Among these are Afghanistan, Kenya, Tanzania, New York City's "Ground Zero," and most recently, Abbottabad, Pakistan. The suffix found on some of these names, such as stan in Afghanistan... Continue reading
Posted May 4, 2011 at NGM Blog Central
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Twin towers of the World Trade Center before the 9/11 terrorist attacks; photo by Robert Madden, 1982. President Barack Obama announced late Sunday, May 1 that Osama bin Laden had been killed by U.S. forces outside Islamabad, Pakistan. Bin Laden... Continue reading
Posted May 2, 2011 at NGM Blog Central
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Grenadier Guard on duty at Buckingham Palace, London; Photo by Franc Shor, 1953. Do you know who the Baron of Renfrew is? It's Prince Charles, father of the groom! If you are planning to watch the royal wedding of William... Continue reading
Posted Apr 27, 2011 at NGM Blog Central
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Cell phone; photo by Jeanne Modderman, 2007. April 22nd is Earth Day. Mark the day by learning what happens to your e-waste, possibly despite your best efforts. You have generated e-waste if you've ever discarded a computer, monitor, cell phone,... Continue reading
Posted Apr 22, 2011 at NGM Blog Central
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From left: Aptenodytes forsteri (Emperor penguin), Inkayacu paracasensis, and Eudyptula minor (Little penguin) Nothing is black-and-white, it seems. Not even penguins. That’s what University of Texas paleontologist Julia Clarke found after unearthing 36-million- year-old remains in Peru’s Paracas National Reserve—the... Continue reading
Posted Apr 18, 2011 at NGM Blog Central
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New and Complete Map of Cuba, supplement to National Geographic magazine, October 1906; NG Maps. Since our first post, this blog has addressed the history of cartography at National Geographic, geographic names (toponyms), and even the cartographic exploits of James... Continue reading
Posted Apr 18, 2011 at NGM Blog Central
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A photographer as well as a photo editor, David Arnold traveled to Alaska for a story in October 1977. Photo editors are the behind-the-scenes heroes of a photographer’s work. The editor sees every single frame and picks up on every... Continue reading
Posted Apr 15, 2011 at NGM Blog Central
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See the the full graphic of racial and ethnic intermarriages Barack Obama made history when he became America’s first black president. His parents were pioneers as well: When they wed in 1961, interracial unions were illegal in more than a... Continue reading
Posted Apr 13, 2011 at NGM Blog Central
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This skeleton of a prehistoric seabird is helping scientists study the anatomy of flight in supersize birds. While hunting for shark teeth in Chile a few years ago, fossil collectors hit a giant jackpot: the nearly intact remains of a... Continue reading
Posted Apr 13, 2011 at NGM Blog Central
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Tibetan place-names in the first edition of the National Geographic Atlas of the World (1963) were shown in romanized Tibetan followed by their romanized Chinese names in parentheses. NG Maps; Click on image to enlarge. Tibetan place-names in the ninth... Continue reading
Posted Apr 7, 2011 at NGM Blog Central
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Bedouin woman, south of Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; by Jodi Cobb, whose photos were featured in the October, 1987 National Geographic article, "Women of Saudi Arabia." While photographing the recent revolt in Libya Lynsey Addario was captured and later released, along... Continue reading
Posted Apr 5, 2011 at NGM Blog Central
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Four entwined cobras; photo by James P. Blair An Egyptian cobra escaped recently from the Bronx Zoo in New York, prompting a wide search and a twitter feed purportedly written by the cobra itself, keeping the public updated on its... Continue reading
Posted Mar 31, 2011 at NGM Blog Central
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Photo: Iguaçu Falls on the border of Brazil and Argentina. Photograph by Frans Lanting March 22nd is World Water Day, as proclaimed by the United Nations, with a 2011 theme of "Water for Cities: Responding to the Urban Challenge." Southern... Continue reading
Posted Mar 21, 2011 at NGM Blog Central
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Graphic: A rich lunar portrait—and an early history of our solar system—is emerging from a wealth of fresh topographic data. See the enlarged lunar-surface map. Sam Pepple. Source: NASA Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter Move over, man in the moon. Now... Continue reading
Posted Mar 18, 2011 at NGM Blog Central
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NG Maps Depending on the type of map, at National Geographic we use conventional (English) spellings, native spellings, or a combination of both where scale permits. Although we have tried to devise a system that addresses many variant naming conventions,... Continue reading
Posted Mar 17, 2011 at NGM Blog Central
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Celtic ruins on Skellig Michael, Ireland, with Little Skellig shown in the distance; photo by James P. Blair, 1989 Celebrate St. Patrick's Day with a virtual visit to the Emerald Isle. Meet Clonycavan Man, eerily preserved in an Irish peat... Continue reading
Posted Mar 17, 2011 at NGM Blog Central
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Map Image: NG Maps During times of political upheaval, people scrutinize our maps closely and often write to ask about the origins of place names on our maps. Take Libya, for example. Since the beginning of the rebellion there, news... Continue reading
Posted Mar 16, 2011 at NGM Blog Central
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Few geographers die famous. The Greek poet Homer is sometimes referred to as the "Father of Geography," but he is most remembered for the Iliad and the Odyssey. Retired British surveyor George Everest had the world’s highest mountain named for him nearly 150 years ago, but it's a safe bet that more people associate Mount Everest with Edmund Hillary (or even Jon Krakauer) than with Everest himself. Continue reading
Posted Mar 15, 2011 at NGM Blog Central
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Actor Charlie Sheen’s bizarre behavior seems an unlikely source of inspiration for a sober message. But when Sheen proclaimed that he had "tiger blood," it reminded us that in some parts of the world, tigers and other endangered animals are vulnerable to exploitation for the supposed medicinal and spiritual value of their body parts. While tigers’ blood isn’t much in demand, their pelts, whiskers, penises and bones are all commodities, and a whole tiger can fetch $10,000 and up. We talked to Bryan Christy,who wrote a January 2010 National Geographic Magazine feature about Asia’s illegal wildlife trade... Continue reading
Posted Mar 14, 2011 at NGM Blog Central
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Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant, Pennsylvania; photo by Chris Hamilton The recent earthquake and tsunami in Japan has resulted in damage to one nuclear reactor on Honshu Island, and a second is at risk. The world has seen nuclear... Continue reading
Posted Mar 14, 2011 at NGM Blog Central
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Photograph by Debapratim Saha The protected pachyderms of West Bengal, India—such as those in the Mahananda Wildlife Sanctuary (top)—are hardly out of harm's way. In fact, since 2004, 27 have been killed by trains barreling down the hundred miles of... Continue reading
Posted Mar 14, 2011 at NGM Blog Central
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When final map files are scheduled to be shipped to the printer, all map-makers can do is hope that no earth-shattering changes occur before their map comes off the press. Continue reading
Posted Mar 11, 2011 at NGM Blog Central
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Fifty years ago 51 Americans arrived in Ghana to "promote world peace and friendship." Since then, more than 200,000 volunteers—ages 18 to 86, some now diplomats and politicians—have served in 139 nations. But the Peace Corps is no fame game... Continue reading
Posted Mar 11, 2011 at NGM Blog Central