This is Mike's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Mike's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Mike
Recent Activity
I was with you up until the bit about Dodd-Frank being a bill that "helps people". It helps people exactly the same way SOPA helps people -- by replacing freedom with government control. Why is government interference with the internet a threat, but government interference in a free economy "helping people"? I'd prefer freedom from tyranny in my financial life as well as on the internet. Having the government decide what financial transactions should be restricted is no more acceptable than having them decide what internet content should be restricted. Remember, nobody in Congress is out there looking out for you -- they will make decisions based on who kicks in the next 94 million dollars. So Dodd-Frank isn't about protecting you, the consumer, it's about protecting the people who funnel money into the right pockets.
1 reply
Won't kick him while he's down? I sure as hell will, if it will decrease spam. I'll kick him right in the 8.
Toggle Commented Mar 27, 2009 on in the country of the kaurava king at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
I don't think they'd go with the Clown Sweater.
1 reply
I don't think they'd go with the Clown Sweater.
1 reply
Since laughter is the best medicine, try a dose of this (Guitar Hero 0.5, the INFOCOM-style text adventure version): http://www.tiedyeheart.com/img/comic/2.jpg
Toggle Commented Feb 12, 2008 on just nod if you can hear me at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
Since laughter is the best medicine, try a dose of this (Guitar Hero 0.5, the INFOCOM-style text adventure version): http://www.tiedyeheart.com/img/comic/2.jpg
Toggle Commented Feb 12, 2008 on just nod if you can hear me at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
I don't think I've ever seen you blog on Shatner's "Has Been". While earlier efforts were unquestionably crapfests, I found this to be amusing -- and not in an unintentional way. (Credit probably should go more to Ben Folds). Have you heard it? Care to comment? If you haven't yet heard it, at least get a hold of the title track.
Toggle Commented Jan 29, 2007 on movement of Jah Shatner at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
I don't think I've ever seen you blog on Shatner's "Has Been". While earlier efforts were unquestionably crapfests, I found this to be amusing -- and not in an unintentional way. (Credit probably should go more to Ben Folds). Have you heard it? Care to comment? If you haven't yet heard it, at least get a hold of the title track.
Toggle Commented Jan 29, 2007 on movement of Jah Shatner at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
It seems a bizarre coincidence that the diameter of Earth's orbit is the distance traveled by light in one second. Why is this, Wil? I'm sure you have the explanation :-)
1 reply
It seems a bizarre coincidence that the diameter of Earth's orbit is the distance traveled by light in one second. Why is this, Wil? I'm sure you have the explanation :-)
1 reply
Hmm, fun idea. Here's mine: 1. Foundation Trilogy, Asimov. These are short enough that the trilogy is just book-length by today's standards, and I prefer this to the robot stories. 2. Dune, Frank Herbert. 3. The City and the Stars, Arthur C. Clarke. This has always been my favorite of Clarke's work, which says a lot since he was probably my favorite author growing up (Sands of Mars, A Fall of Moondust, Childhood's End are others I read until I wore them out). 4. Ender's Game, Orson Scott Card. I almost put Seventh Son here, since Ender's Game was already listed. But although I like them both, I think Ender's Game is a clear favorite. Hard to decide where to put my final vote. If we're including fantasy, then Lord of the Rings is the must include. Larry Niven's Protector is another. But I think I'll pull one completely from left field. 5. Sirens of Titan, Kurt Vonnegut. Just a completely bizarre, time traveling, twisted morality tale. Or investment strategy guide, I was never quite sure which.
1 reply
Hmm, fun idea. Here's mine: 1. Foundation Trilogy, Asimov. These are short enough that the trilogy is just book-length by today's standards, and I prefer this to the robot stories. 2. Dune, Frank Herbert. 3. The City and the Stars, Arthur C. Clarke. This has always been my favorite of Clarke's work, which says a lot since he was probably my favorite author growing up (Sands of Mars, A Fall of Moondust, Childhood's End are others I read until I wore them out). 4. Ender's Game, Orson Scott Card. I almost put Seventh Son here, since Ender's Game was already listed. But although I like them both, I think Ender's Game is a clear favorite. Hard to decide where to put my final vote. If we're including fantasy, then Lord of the Rings is the must include. Larry Niven's Protector is another. But I think I'll pull one completely from left field. 5. Sirens of Titan, Kurt Vonnegut. Just a completely bizarre, time traveling, twisted morality tale. Or investment strategy guide, I was never quite sure which.
1 reply