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Simona Carini
Northern California
An Italian transplanted in California
Interests: creative cooking, cheese making, bread baking, food writing, blogging, book and box making, kayaking, photography, classical music You can contact me at simosite [AT] mac [DOT] com
Recent Activity
My pleasure, as always, Debra. I am already thinking about #32 :)
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on Novel Food #31: the finale at briciole
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Thank you, Debra, glad you do :) It was fun playing with that.
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Welcome to the roundup of the 31st edition of Novel Food, the literary/culinary event that Lisa of Champaign Taste and I created in 2007 — 10 years ago! Novel Food is about literary works (prose or poetry) that inspire the preparation of dishes. I continue to host this event with great pleasure, as it brings together two of my passions: literature and food. Once again, book-loving food bloggers have contributed a set of lovely posts, each describing a literary work that the blogger read and the dish that the reading inspired. Please, follow me on a short literary/culinary tour. For each... Continue reading
Posted 3 days ago at briciole
I am not a reader of self-improvement books, Phil. I prefer to snuggle with a good mystery than follow someone's advice, but this book has been quite helpful and it has made me say "why not?" a number of times when inspiration pulled me in a certain direction. I've also dived into making a new type of cheese: we'll see whether the result is worth sharing on the blog :)
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what happens when you drop a poppy seedpod (on La FABBRICA del LINO placemat) In the many years I have been hosting Novel Food I have contributed and received contributions inspired by a wide range of literature, from thick novels to flash nonfiction, from intense memoir to moving poems. One category of books notably absent from the Novel Food library is so-called self-improvement books, which examine a life's problem and offer advice on a way forward (I prefer to avoid the word "solution" which is better applied to math problems). The Sweet Spot: How to Find Your Groove at Home and... Continue reading
Posted Oct 8, 2017 at briciole
Thank you Claudia. I don't know much about her life except for what I heard in the NPR piece, which talked, among other things, about the collaboration with her daughter in writing the books. They also talked about the hard life of the women at the time. I totally sympathize with Almanzo's wish for a horse :)
Toggle Commented Oct 5, 2017 on apple tart / crostata di mele at briciole
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Thank you Wendy :)
Toggle Commented Oct 5, 2017 on apple tart / crostata di mele at briciole
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Hope the move went well, Alicia. I did notice that food was always plentiful on the table (and always lots of pie :)
Toggle Commented Oct 1, 2017 on apple tart / crostata di mele at briciole
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Thank you Deb. The NPR piece was timely as I knew little about the author.
Toggle Commented Oct 1, 2017 on apple tart / crostata di mele at briciole
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Thank you Debra. I agree: this is apple season and freshly harvested apples are too tempting right now.
Toggle Commented Oct 1, 2017 on apple tart / crostata di mele at briciole
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a personal take on an Italian classic Laura Ingalls Wilder's Farmer Boy, the current selection of our Cook the Books Club, is a well-known children's book in the US. It was an interesting read, giving me a glimpse into some of the literature people my age were exposed to during their childhood and a view into rural life and related activities in an age and place quite removed from mine. For Almanzo and his family the year was marked by the seasonal work they did, and that work is described in detail by Ingalls Wilder. There is also moral content, mostly... Continue reading
Posted Sep 30, 2017 at briciole
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Thank you so much for contributing, Deb :)
Toggle Commented Sep 30, 2017 on Announcing: Novel Food #31 at briciole
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I am hosting another edition of Novel Food, the culinary/literary event with a long history, going back to the fall of 2007. I read a lot and cook a lot and although many things in my life have changed in the years since, those two pillars still stand. So, here I am announcing another edition of Novel Food, a little voyage of literary discovery and also a delightful party with the literary-inspired dishes contributed by event's participants. I hope you will join. I am looking forward to learning about a published literary work (a novel, novella, short story, memoir, bio, poem,... Continue reading
Posted Sep 7, 2017 at briciole
Please, do, Cathy. It's a lovely salad.
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You are welcome, Wendy. I was moved by the story you shared. Her Soviet cookbook is great.
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You are welcome, Claudia. I love the cookbook: it has great recipes, but also information on the culture of the various Soviet republics.
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Von Bremzen tells a lot of details about life during the Soviet era that are quite interesting, including the story of corn cultivation in Russia. I can't say whether Russians would welcome your pudding, but I am not surprised you always bring back your dish empty: it looks wonderful! Sweet corn season has just started here and I am looking forward to eating it. Thank you so much for your contribution to this edition of Cook the Books :)
Toggle Commented Aug 2, 2017 on Fresh Indian Corn Pudding at Delaware Girl Eats
Thank you Evelyne. I am glad you enjoyed reading the book. I agree that the title did not prepare the reader for its rich historical and social stories. I'll remember the part about the mayonnaise jar for a long time :)
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Yes, you can, Debra. Thank you!
Toggle Commented Jul 29, 2017 on Novel Food #30: the finale at briciole
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Wow, what an experience, Frank, to be there at a time of big political changes. The book gives an interesting perspective of events that I saw from the outside.
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You are welcome, Deb. Thanks for contributing :)
Toggle Commented Jul 13, 2017 on Novel Food #30: the finale at briciole
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Do it, if you can, Deb: it is a beautiful country and the people are wonderful. And you can adopt a skyr diet (which is what a did ;)
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Thank you so much, Ali. I am so glad you enjoy Novel Food. This tart is quite versatile: you can use other vegetables or a mix. It's good also reheated :)
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I will take a look at the author you mention, Claudia. I have read about Dill, but have not been there. I have not been to Reykjavik, actually. I had a plan of doing it the last day I was in Iceland, but then drove around the Reykjanes peninsula, south of Reykjavik. It reminded me a lot of the Big Island because of its lava fields :)
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It's always a pleasure to participate in Souper Sundays, Deb. I hope you'll enjoy the book :)
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