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Simona Carini
Northern California
An Italian transplanted in California
Interests: creative cooking, cheese making, bread baking, food writing, blogging, book and box making, kayaking, photography, classical music You can contact me at simosite [AT] mac [DOT] com
Recent Activity
Thank you Debra :) It was quite surprising, given that the first novel was published in 1979 (I also learned that a movie of it was made in 1998).
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I read those four novels fairly quickly, Wendy: they are engaging.
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Thank you Mae for telling me about Stargazy pie: I had not heard of it :)
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Welcome to the roundup of the 34th edition of Novel Food, the literary/culinary event that Lisa of Champaign Taste and I created in 2007. Novel Food is about literary works (prose or poetry) that inspire the preparation of dishes. I continue to host this event with great pleasure, as it brings together two of my passions: literature and food. Every edition delivers a great reading list and a lovely set of recipes. A group of book-loving food bloggers has contributed posts, each describing a literary work and the dish that the reading inspired. You are invited to follow me on a... Continue reading
Posted Oct 14, 2018 at briciole
I like that at farmers' markets I can find heirloom apple varieties and I like to taste them all, decide which ones I like best as a snack and which ones are better cooked. The recipe you chose looks great and just what's needed to warm us up on those early cold evenings. Thank you for contributing to Novel Food :)
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a favorite dinner fare (linen by La FABBRICA del LINO) At a conference this past February I met author Anne Perry and a few days later to I found myself in a bookstore that had a copy of The Cater Street Hangman, first book of the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt series1. The coincidence was too tempting to resist. I liked the book so much that I read the following three novels in the series: Callander Square, Paragon Walk and Resurrection Row. Besides being good mysteries, the novels attract me because of their setting: Victorian England. They look at the life of... Continue reading
Posted Oct 11, 2018 at briciole
Thank you, Lynda. I hope someday you'll give sourdough starter another try :)
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Hello Joe and thank you for your comment. I have a recipe for pierogi, but a vegetarian version. You can see it in this post: http://www.pulcetta.com/2014/07/pierogi-ripieno-verdure-vegetable-pierogi.html
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I remember the sourdough episode from our visit to Alaska (I don't want to think about how many years have passed since then). I understand not wanting to have that responsibility again. One way could be to befriend a baker and ask for a bit of theirs and not investing too much emotional energy into it (meaning, if it dies, so be it). The crackers are addictive: when I make them I give away some so I don't overindulge. I am also looking forward to reading Michael's book.
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I wonder whether Ms Waters read the book. I hope she had some good laughs. I like how you connected your recipe to the story, Cathy, and your galette looks great.
Good luck on your new starter, Claudia. You have other yeasts and small colonies going in your kitchen, so you know you are a good caretaker :)
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I don't freeze it for long periods of time, but if I am gone for more than a week, the refrigerator is not an option. The other thing is allowing it a bit more time to come back to full life. Yeasts are in the flour and the air. Also, a pinch of of bran helps. I suggest you give it a try and see how you like it: the important thing is to establish a caring routine that works with your schedule.
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I would give sourdough another try, Phil. I think sometimes instructions to care for it make things more complicated than they need to be for a home bread baker. Refrigerator and freezer are your friends, though certainly one cannot completely forget about it. While they may not provide the same level of satisfaction as a well-risen and well-baked loaf, crackers are a joy to make: they take little time and are versatile. I hope you give these a try :)
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That's why I looked for something different Debra. From an ingredients' perspective, sourdough starter is a mix of flour and water, so it makes sense to use it in other ways. I plan to find and try other recipes along the same line. Good luck with your sourdough bread :)
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one by one, they will soon be all gone (placemat by La FABBRICA del LINO) The August-September selection of the Cook the Books club is the novel Sourdough by Robin Sloan1. Intriguing title, I thought immediately, but did not know what to expect: I rarely read reviews before I read a book (sometimes do so after turning over the last page2). Being familiar with the San Francisco Bay Area contributed to the story's appeal, but even if you don't know the island of Alameda or the San Francisco Ferry Building, you will enjoy the twists and turns of Lois Clary's adventures... Continue reading
Posted Sep 23, 2018 at briciole
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As summer slowly slides into the warm colors of fall in the northern hemisphere, it carries the announcement of another edition of the culinary/literary event Novel Food. I read a lot and cook a lot and although many things in my life have changed in the 11 years since I started my blog, those two pillars still stand firmly. Novel Food is a little voyage of literary discovery and a delightful party featuring literary-inspired dishes contributed by event's participants. I hope you will join. I am looking forward to learning about a published literary work (a novel, novella, short story, memoir,... Continue reading
Posted Sep 12, 2018 at briciole
The problem with gougères is that you cannot stop at one or two and soon enough they are all gone :) Great choice of recipe to make. I have used Lebovitz's version which indeed calls for a higher baking temperature to start with to get the puffing action, then lowers the temperature to allow for even baking. It is here: https://www.davidlebovitz.com/gougeres-french-cheese-puffs/
The cue ball looks nice! I will the other stuffings soon: as you say, they make a nice dish :)
Toggle Commented Aug 9, 2018 on stuffed zucchini / zucchine ripiene at briciole
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I hope you can find some Wendy: they are really perfect for stuffing and the result is prettier than when one uses the long ones :)
Toggle Commented Aug 3, 2018 on stuffed zucchini / zucchine ripiene at briciole
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Me too, Lynda. I think they are considered a bit of a specialty item, and given their shape they take more space. Hurrah for Farmers' Markets! :)
Toggle Commented Aug 3, 2018 on stuffed zucchini / zucchine ripiene at briciole
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I hope you will, Debra :)
Toggle Commented Aug 3, 2018 on stuffed zucchini / zucchine ripiene at briciole
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Agree, the round ones are much better for stuffing, Frank. I am lucky farmers here grow them :)
Toggle Commented Aug 3, 2018 on stuffed zucchini / zucchine ripiene at briciole
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I wish I could actually make the noodles: such an intriguing process! Beautiful photo, Cathy: one can tell the noodles are hot and spicy :)
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a delicious pair on a plate (napkin by La FABBRICA del LINO) The June-July selection of the Cook the Books club was Garlic and Sapphires, The Secret Life of a Critic in Disguise by Ruth Reichl1. The author is well known for her sparkling prose and engaging way of talking about food—the latter skill honed during her career as food critic, which is the subject of this memoir. Readers interested in restaurants in NYC and the life of a restaurant reviewer will find the book entertaining. To be honest, I am neither. I think that her first memoir, Tender at the... Continue reading
Posted Jul 31, 2018 at briciole
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Non ti preoccupare, Lucia. Spero che riuscirai a provare le albicocche: sono davvero ottime (e anche altre ricette contribuite uniscono frutta e salumi). Un abbraccio :)
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