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Simona Carini
Northern California
An Italian transplanted in California
Interests: creative cooking, cheese making, bread baking, food writing, blogging, book and box making, kayaking, photography, classical music You can contact me at simosite [AT] mac [DOT] com
Recent Activity
The problem with gougères is that you cannot stop at one or two and soon enough they are all gone :) Great choice of recipe to make. I have used Lebovitz's version which indeed calls for a higher baking temperature to start with to get the puffing action, then lowers the temperature to allow for even baking. It is here: https://www.davidlebovitz.com/gougeres-french-cheese-puffs/
The cue ball looks nice! I will the other stuffings soon: as you say, they make a nice dish :)
Toggle Commented Aug 9, 2018 on stuffed zucchini / zucchine ripiene at briciole
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I hope you can find some Wendy: they are really perfect for stuffing and the result is prettier than when one uses the long ones :)
Toggle Commented Aug 3, 2018 on stuffed zucchini / zucchine ripiene at briciole
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Me too, Lynda. I think they are considered a bit of a specialty item, and given their shape they take more space. Hurrah for Farmers' Markets! :)
Toggle Commented Aug 3, 2018 on stuffed zucchini / zucchine ripiene at briciole
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I hope you will, Debra :)
Toggle Commented Aug 3, 2018 on stuffed zucchini / zucchine ripiene at briciole
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Agree, the round ones are much better for stuffing, Frank. I am lucky farmers here grow them :)
Toggle Commented Aug 3, 2018 on stuffed zucchini / zucchine ripiene at briciole
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I wish I could actually make the noodles: such an intriguing process! Beautiful photo, Cathy: one can tell the noodles are hot and spicy :)
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a delicious pair on a plate (napkin by La FABBRICA del LINO) The June-July selection of the Cook the Books club was Garlic and Sapphires, The Secret Life of a Critic in Disguise by Ruth Reichl1. The author is well known for her sparkling prose and engaging way of talking about food—the latter skill honed during her career as food critic, which is the subject of this memoir. Readers interested in restaurants in NYC and the life of a restaurant reviewer will find the book entertaining. To be honest, I am neither. I think that her first memoir, Tender at the... Continue reading
Posted Jul 31, 2018 at briciole
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Non ti preoccupare, Lucia. Spero che riuscirai a provare le albicocche: sono davvero ottime (e anche altre ricette contribuite uniscono frutta e salumi). Un abbraccio :)
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Grazie Aiu' e Sabrina per il vostro contributo :)
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Grazie Cinzia, Resy, Marta e Rosa Maria :)
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Grazie Monia, Resy e carla Emilia :)
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Grazie Cristina ed Elena per il vostro gustoso contributo :)
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Grazie Elena. Qui per fortuna le trovo piu' facilmente, ma certo la loro stagione non e' lunga e quindi non appena le vedo al mercato approfitto.
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Great idea, Debra. I can tell you that it was difficult to stop after two pieces.
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You are welcome, Cathy :)
Toggle Commented Jul 6, 2018 on Novel Food #33: the finale at briciole
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An interesting view, Cathy. I read every day. We don't watch TV and reading is how I end my day, in silence, usually with one cat sitting next to my legs and the other on the arm of the couch, close to my head. Our cats are not the lap kind. I know the Liebling's book and I believe I read part of it some time ago. If it can tempt you, Olive Kitteridge is also slim ;)
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I hope it cools off during the weekend, Cathy: extreme heat is not fun. I imagine not wanting to talk about traumatic experiences. It is not possible to generalize what happens when someone decides not to revisit certain events of his/her life. Problems may occur when those event become a wall and the person is behind it, so that, as in the case of Peter, the book's protagonist, nobody can reach across, not his daughter nor his wife. My father was the opposite: he talked a lot about what happened to him during the war and I believe it was his way of making sense of the fact that he had survived, while so many others had not.
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[cliccare il link per andare alla versione in italiano] sweet, salty, soft, crunchy: the best of all worlds It is stone fruit season! There are plums (prugne) and apricots (albicocche) and then plumcots, pluots and apriums. More than a century ago, horticulturalist Luther Burbank bred the plumcot with a 50-50 plum and apricot split. However, it was Floyd Zaiger who revolutionized the fruit and made it widely available. Zaiger bred the plumcot with a plum to create the pluot — three-fifths plum and two-fifths apricot — and coined the trademarked moniker. While the plumcot is a simple plum and apricot cross,... Continue reading
Posted Jul 6, 2018 at briciole
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You are welcome, Lucia :)
Toggle Commented Jul 5, 2018 on Novel Food #33: the finale at briciole
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Me too: a really nice selection of books, indeed. Thank you for your contributions, Debra :)
Toggle Commented Jul 5, 2018 on Novel Food #33: the finale at briciole
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Thank you, Debra. I don't know why it took me so long to think about making chocolate bread. There is no turning back now ;)
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I suggest you give the book a try, Wendy. As I mentioned in my reply to Claudia, the stories follow the arc of Olive's life so there is an overall sense of a novel, though the form is in short stories.
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I confess I didn't even think about it, Claudia, but I will work on a version of the recipe with olives and walnuts, then let you know. Thank you for the suggestion :) The book is quite well structured: it is a series of short stories, in chronological order, so you follow Olive's story from the initial view of her, her husband and young son to many years later, with events big and small occurring along the way.
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I loved the book and found Olive interesting and challenging as a character, in other words, deeply human. I chuckled when Olive takes a little revenge on her daughter-in-law and also understand Olive's son need to move far away from her. I think it is hard to say "I like Olive": she is not easy to like, but if one is patient and manages to go past the thick armor she seems to always wear in public, there is a reward in having her as friend.
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