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laurie ruettimann
Raleigh, NC
Punk Rock HR Professional
Interests: cats, bacon
Recent Activity
Paul, I'm sorry I didn't chime in sooner. When someone has an investment in the status quo, there is no compelling reason to evangelize and support the new & emerging technologies. Peter knows what works for him and what doesn't work for him, and I think his post is an example of how power corrupts -- or makes someone lazy. He is using a platform to benefit his own interests instead of the interests of workers and the recruiting industry. You can only evangelize for so long in America before you get tired, you get sick of traveling, and you need to pay the tuition bills and the mortgages. I suspect that if social media could meet these needs for Peter, he would embrace it.
Good lord, no good HR Professional reads the ET or TMZ websites. They're too crazy with ads. We go straight to the source: - People - UsWeekly - Perez - HuffPost celebrities/fashion It's quality versus quantity.
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Dude, it doesn't look like you ripped me. Your take is different, and I think it's funny because we both love cats (although your love is much more private). I thought this post reaffirmed the awesome similarities between us! It's all good, KD. Who doesn't love ninja kitties?!
Toggle Commented May 24, 2009 on Catfight!!! at Fistful of Talent
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I love that ninja kitty picture so much. It's the perfect picture for catfights, bullies, and other workplace altercations. http://punkrockhr.com/2009/05/13/new-lemondrop-post-nut-up/ I agree with Paul, too. Dudes take their issues to the bar and end up bonding over sports & stupid stuff. Chicks should try it more often.
Toggle Commented May 23, 2009 on Catfight!!! at Fistful of Talent
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I think it will be fun, but I'd prefer Green Day.
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Good post. I haven't hired sales pros in almost two years, and the most senior-level sales professional I hired was a Sr. Director and not a VP, but the job was very lucrative with options & cars & money & stuff. Here was my approach. "You made X dollars last year? Good for you. I don't care. I made you my best offer first because amateurs negotiate salaries. We told you what job pays at our shop. We want you. We were honest about it. This is what we can do for you. You either accept it or you don't." The older I get, the more I respect a clear and simple compensation negotiation strategy. If you're not making me your best offer FIRST, you don't really respect me.
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What a nice post. Thank you!
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I wish I could have been there to see you drink too many diet cokes. That would have been rad! Great deck, though. I like the on 'spy on employees'. So funny!
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Victorio, you're absolutely right. We need a thoughtful compromise to this debate.
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I'm serious. Your comment is thoughtful and offers much more insight than most of the commentary out there. Take the compliment. I mean it!
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Hey, Chris has a really interesting comment. I want to read that blog!
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I applaud you for embracing the bracket system. If you could somehow apply the bracket system to federal agencies and programs that need stimulus money, I'd offer your name as Secretary of Commerce.
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I think this article is so insightful. Gen X is self-deprecating and Gen Y is all about marketing, team building, and leading by consensus. http://theicepickcometh.wordpress.com/2008/12/29/generation-guilt/ Gen X doesn't take itself seriously and we're not interested in operating 'brazen'ly and making a big deal out of it. When we see a Gen Y kid operating with youthful optimism -- and someone who buys into the status quo -- we are embarrassed for him.
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Seriously, I love these vlogs. You are adorable!
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Your comment originally went to spam. Thanks for the link, Chris!
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Angela missed white collor -- it should be 'white collar job'. Props to Run DMC. xo/laurie
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Kris, if we believe in the marketplace (& I do), wouldn't we just tell employees to perform and then oust the ones that don't? I think employee wellness programs are lovely, but I'd rather have my company pay me based on my performance & terminate my employment if I suck. Wellness programs? Where's the ROI? I think a better talent management program and the implementation of a thoughtful recruiting program would have a better return on the company's investment. Also, for reals, the data is all over the map on wellness programs. Some say it works. Other data says that it's garbage. You know what works? Treating employees with respect, investing in strong & competitive compensation plans, and implementing policies that make sense. I hate administration, and wellness programs seem like another form of administration to me. xo/laurie
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Kris, While this post scratches the surface of the Palin selection and its relationship to doing things differently, I would love for your readers to discuss the selection of Palin in a more thoughtful way. Some argue that Palin was only selected as a product of affirmative action -- something that most GOP (and DNC) followers abhor. Tom Ridge and Bay Buchanan have both said as much (i.e., picked because she's a woman), and they are on opposite sides of the GOP tent. Furthermore, some argue that selecting Palin was an obvious move. She's an evangelical who is strong on guns and Jesus and holds anti-abortion positions. I heard GOP strategists argue that a true example of shaking up the status quo would be hiring Condi or Carly as the 2nd in command. Both women are fundamentally different than McCain and bring a wealth of experience and freshness to the party. Finally, I heard that Palin secures the evangelical base and was tapped as an insult to Romney, who blew up the selection of McCain's first choice: Lieberman. In that sense, McCain plays the same old politics-by-retribution game that so many people play in Washington DC. He's not strong enough to follow his gut instincts and choose Joe, but he's strong enough to stick it in Romney's eye. In my mind, this Palin choice is disappointing. McCain could have been a true maverick and made a better choice -- one that tapped into his desire to do things differently in Washington and make history, too. My two cents, yo. Thanks for letting me get this out. - Laurie
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I agree and think that Brett Favre obviously needs the cash, right?
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Kris, you deserve OTE time-and-a-half pay for this excellent summary. Great carnival!!
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I just read the Wired article on Julia Allison, and it seems as if the world falls into one of two camps: pro-Penelope Trunk and anti-Penelope Trunk. According to Julia Allison, that's okay because we're talking about Penelope Trunk and her message is getting out there. So if you don't agree with Penelope, the best thing you can do is stop talking about her. Also, Penelope worked in VC and I believe she's managing a team at her new Brazen Careerist start-up organization; however, I could be wrong and she could just be a figurehead for some other dude's money and efforts. Regarding pay transparency: no one with common sense advocates a soviet-style system, but transparency doesn't necessarily equate to violating confidentiality. It could be as simple as transparency around bands/grades or providing employees with data on where employees tend to fall on the spectrum. Or do we think employees are too stupid to understand compensation data? I say, if they're too stupid to understand a compensation process, we shouldn't hire them in the first place.
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Kris, If I wanted to watch old & fat dudes on stage covered in sweat, I'd go to a SHRM after-party karaoke session. Let's book Green Day and just be done with the conversation.
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I took AIRS courses in 2002 and the world seems like a different place.
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Kris, the solutions are so EASY. Pull employers out of the business of insuring employees and the carrot/stick approach is unnecessary. Then pay your employees based on performance, make your CEO accountable, and ensure that your board of directors is staffed with responsible individuals who have the best interest of the company at heart. Like I said, so easy. So simple. :)
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