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Eileen
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Wil~ I have E-B, too, and always caught every bug that came down the pike until last year. The two things I did that have kept me completely flu/cold free for nearly two years are: I had my D3 levels tested - and yes, I know you live in sunny CA, but you are also (dare I say it) very white, so your levels may not be up to optimal levels - to protect from various bugs, cancers and etc, your D3 levels should be between 70-100. If you need to raise your levels, take the gelcap or liquid D3 in 'cholecalciferol' form (NOT powder capsules or tablets, those don't absorb right for many people). For more info, check out: http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/ And for folks with immune disorders such as E-B, a really good immune system regulator is Low Dose Naltrexone. My energy, pain, and mood levels have been hugely improved since adding this to my regimen: http://www.ldnscience.org/low-dose-naltrexone-ldn/what-is-ldn-used-for Using these I've been able to have constant and close contact with family members who were sneezing and coughing and feeling like the walking dead... and stayed flu free throughout. Just a thought - so that you don't have to fear if someone insists on hugging you or coughing on you when you're trapped in the elevator. Good luck!
Toggle Commented Aug 12, 2010 on epic wil ... ll ... ll at WWdN: In Exile
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For some reason the last couple months seem to be forcing a 'transition phase' on just about everyone I know. I'm hoping this wave of transitions will continue until it applies to, I don't know, a certain important date in November... we could definitely use a big transition there. In any case, letting go of the familiar and beloved is difficult, and you've had a fair share of goodbyes this fall/winter. I just want to say that you are handling these changes with an admirable degree of grace and aplomb, and are providing for your sons and your readers an excellent model for moving into the future with hope while maintaining an appreciation for the gifts (and lessons) of the past. Thanks for all the fish, indeed!
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For some reason the last couple months seem to be forcing a 'transition phase' on just about everyone I know. I'm hoping this wave of transitions will continue until it applies to, I don't know, a certain important date in November... we could definitely use a big transition there. In any case, letting go of the familiar and beloved is difficult, and you've had a fair share of goodbyes this fall/winter. I just want to say that you are handling these changes with an admirable degree of grace and aplomb, and are providing for your sons and your readers an excellent model for moving into the future with hope while maintaining an appreciation for the gifts (and lessons) of the past. Thanks for all the fish, indeed!
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Seriously. My kid had an immunity deficiency as a littl'un that effectively kept us both isolated in our house for several years, and the only media he had exposure to until he was 5 was Sesame Street. When he was 2, he picked up a K'Nex rod, pointed it at random around the room and made (quite realistic) shooting and exploding noises. It's in the chromosomes, dude...
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Seriously. My kid had an immunity deficiency as a littl'un that effectively kept us both isolated in our house for several years, and the only media he had exposure to until he was 5 was Sesame Street. When he was 2, he picked up a K'Nex rod, pointed it at random around the room and made (quite realistic) shooting and exploding noises. It's in the chromosomes, dude...
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I've always related to your stories about the kiddos (and your relationship with them), because my son is (nearly) Ryan's age, and has many things in common with both your boys. But never so much as now, when I look forward to Orientation Day on the 22nd with so much mingled anticipation, dread, excitement, anxiety, and nostalgia. We've raised boys we can be proud to send out into the world, boys we've prepared as best we can to deal with the rewards and pitfalls of Real Life - but it's hard to think of them facing those challenges without our loving arms (and annoying advice) as a safety net, and hard to realize that we won't be on the spot to share the triumphs and woes as they are happening. And as we both are people who do much of our 'paid work' at home, I suspect you will miss the companionship, as well. Although perhaps not as much as I - my son is an Only, so I don't have a Backup Youngster to cushion the blow. I always mourn each stage as it passes, even though I've always enjoyed and appreciated each new stage even more. This one will be harder, but we'll live with the change, as will they. But I'll bet they'll enjoy it more!
Toggle Commented Aug 9, 2007 on ryan catches a typo at WWdN: In Exile
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I've always related to your stories about the kiddos (and your relationship with them), because my son is (nearly) Ryan's age, and has many things in common with both your boys. But never so much as now, when I look forward to Orientation Day on the 22nd with so much mingled anticipation, dread, excitement, anxiety, and nostalgia. We've raised boys we can be proud to send out into the world, boys we've prepared as best we can to deal with the rewards and pitfalls of Real Life - but it's hard to think of them facing those challenges without our loving arms (and annoying advice) as a safety net, and hard to realize that we won't be on the spot to share the triumphs and woes as they are happening. And as we both are people who do much of our 'paid work' at home, I suspect you will miss the companionship, as well. Although perhaps not as much as I - my son is an Only, so I don't have a Backup Youngster to cushion the blow. I always mourn each stage as it passes, even though I've always enjoyed and appreciated each new stage even more. This one will be harder, but we'll live with the change, as will they. But I'll bet they'll enjoy it more!
Toggle Commented Aug 9, 2007 on ryan catches a typo at WWdN: In Exile
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Wil, I know a lot of novelists and other published writers, and all I can tell you is that JAG was *not* a wasted opportunity; it was a fairly universal Rite of Passage, authorship-wise. The cover/jacket issue is nearly always a disappointment to authors in their early published works, along with royalty issues and marketing issues and lots of other things. These early disappointments are actually Learning Opportunities, as well as the writing version of paying your dues (something I know you are familiar with in the acting/voiceover field). As you publish more books and have a more proven track record, you will have more clout with which to bargain on your contract... and more experience with which to determine your own personal priorities (because it will probably be a long time before you get everything you want - you are probably going to have to make trade-offs for a while). Don't get discouraged. Most successful authors have gone through similar struggles. The difference between them and the *unsuccessful* authors is that the successful ones learned from the experience. All indications are that you are going to do just fine!
Toggle Commented Feb 5, 2006 on punch a hole in the sky at WWdN: In Exile
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Wil, I know a lot of novelists and other published writers, and all I can tell you is that JAG was *not* a wasted opportunity; it was a fairly universal Rite of Passage, authorship-wise. The cover/jacket issue is nearly always a disappointment to authors in their early published works, along with royalty issues and marketing issues and lots of other things. These early disappointments are actually Learning Opportunities, as well as the writing version of paying your dues (something I know you are familiar with in the acting/voiceover field). As you publish more books and have a more proven track record, you will have more clout with which to bargain on your contract... and more experience with which to determine your own personal priorities (because it will probably be a long time before you get everything you want - you are probably going to have to make trade-offs for a while). Don't get discouraged. Most successful authors have gone through similar struggles. The difference between them and the *unsuccessful* authors is that the successful ones learned from the experience. All indications are that you are going to do just fine!
Toggle Commented Feb 5, 2006 on punch a hole in the sky at WWdN: In Exile
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This made me laugh, because my son would never recognize or care about Fabio, but would have exactly that reaction if he saw *you* drive by. And then I got an image of you high-fiving yourself because you'd caught your own glance in the rear-view mirror...
Toggle Commented Jan 19, 2006 on every moment's a little bit later at WWdN: In Exile
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This made me laugh, because my son would never recognize or care about Fabio, but would have exactly that reaction if he saw *you* drive by. And then I got an image of you high-fiving yourself because you'd caught your own glance in the rear-view mirror...
Toggle Commented Jan 19, 2006 on every moment's a little bit later at WWdN: In Exile
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We're a card-playing family, too. Current favorites are Wizard and Lunch Money, but the kid just got 'Let's Kill'for Christmas (I'm sure there's something ironic in there,somewhere), and we haven't tried it yet. So who knows? There's something about having the Rose Parade, Stealth Bombers, and the Twilight Zone in one place that tickles my inner story teller. Hmmmm... Good luck at the poker tournament! It sounds like it will be fun for both you and Anne, which means... well, hopefully you'll be lucky one way or another. Nice way to start your year!
Toggle Commented Jan 3, 2006 on so this is the new year at WWdN: In Exile
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We're a card-playing family, too. Current favorites are Wizard and Lunch Money, but the kid just got 'Let's Kill'for Christmas (I'm sure there's something ironic in there,somewhere), and we haven't tried it yet. So who knows? There's something about having the Rose Parade, Stealth Bombers, and the Twilight Zone in one place that tickles my inner story teller. Hmmmm... Good luck at the poker tournament! It sounds like it will be fun for both you and Anne, which means... well, hopefully you'll be lucky one way or another. Nice way to start your year!
Toggle Commented Jan 3, 2006 on so this is the new year at WWdN: In Exile
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I didn't comment on your Christmas article, Wil, because at the time you wrote it I was reading "Just a Geek". I had a strong premonition that eventually you were going to wish that you really *were* a Time Traveler, so that you could go back and retract that particular piece. Your earlier prose shines with the love you bear for your family members, and I knew that given a bit of time to calm down and lick your wounds, you were going to develop a more balanced point of view. I'm glad that you did so, and that you were honest enough to present that process to your readers. Like your parents, I suspect that there are a few things you might end up regretting about this article as well. But I think that's part of the process that comes with the decision you've made to be honest with your readers and yourself. 'Warts and All' is, by definition, not always pretty. But we don't learn much from pretty, either. You could choose to only write things that are upbeat and Nice and Fun - there's a place for that sort of writing (and reading). But it's not particularly meaningful. It's not the sort of writing that stays with us. It takes a strong person to present himself as flawed, and to admit his mistakes. You've proven that you have that sort of strength. I know that you are sincere in your regret for the mistake that you've made - but now I hope that you'll challenge yourself in another way, and be strong enough to accept that mistake and your own sincere feelings, learn what you can from them, and then lay the shame you are feeling aside. Remember that those self-flagellating monks in "Monty Python and the Holy Grail" didn't accomplish anything through their self-blaming behavior - they blinded themselves to the world around them, and fell/jumped pointlessly into the ocean. Not the sort of thing your parents would be terribly happy to see you emulate. Live, learn, make mistakes, get messy, slap your forehead and exclaim 'D'oh!' - and then keep going and make your parents proud. I still suspect your mom thinks everyone should be so lucky as to have a son like you.
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I didn't comment on your Christmas article, Wil, because at the time you wrote it I was reading "Just a Geek". I had a strong premonition that eventually you were going to wish that you really *were* a Time Traveler, so that you could go back and retract that particular piece. Your earlier prose shines with the love you bear for your family members, and I knew that given a bit of time to calm down and lick your wounds, you were going to develop a more balanced point of view. I'm glad that you did so, and that you were honest enough to present that process to your readers. Like your parents, I suspect that there are a few things you might end up regretting about this article as well. But I think that's part of the process that comes with the decision you've made to be honest with your readers and yourself. 'Warts and All' is, by definition, not always pretty. But we don't learn much from pretty, either. You could choose to only write things that are upbeat and Nice and Fun - there's a place for that sort of writing (and reading). But it's not particularly meaningful. It's not the sort of writing that stays with us. It takes a strong person to present himself as flawed, and to admit his mistakes. You've proven that you have that sort of strength. I know that you are sincere in your regret for the mistake that you've made - but now I hope that you'll challenge yourself in another way, and be strong enough to accept that mistake and your own sincere feelings, learn what you can from them, and then lay the shame you are feeling aside. Remember that those self-flagellating monks in "Monty Python and the Holy Grail" didn't accomplish anything through their self-blaming behavior - they blinded themselves to the world around them, and fell/jumped pointlessly into the ocean. Not the sort of thing your parents would be terribly happy to see you emulate. Live, learn, make mistakes, get messy, slap your forehead and exclaim 'D'oh!' - and then keep going and make your parents proud. I still suspect your mom thinks everyone should be so lucky as to have a son like you.
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Merry Christmas to you, Wil, and especially to all 'empty nesters' on this day. When it comes right down to it, it's all about family, isn't it? Our family makes a point of including at least one 'orphan' in our Christmas celebrations, because we know how lucky we are to be all together at this time of year. Being able to share that with others is a gift we give to ourselves, as well as to them - I highly endorse the practice! Enjoy your family today, and enjoy your boys even more tomorrow. Your blessings are many!
Toggle Commented Dec 25, 2005 on the one from christmas eve at WWdN: In Exile
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Merry Christmas to you, Wil, and especially to all 'empty nesters' on this day. When it comes right down to it, it's all about family, isn't it? Our family makes a point of including at least one 'orphan' in our Christmas celebrations, because we know how lucky we are to be all together at this time of year. Being able to share that with others is a gift we give to ourselves, as well as to them - I highly endorse the practice! Enjoy your family today, and enjoy your boys even more tomorrow. Your blessings are many!
Toggle Commented Dec 25, 2005 on the one from christmas eve at WWdN: In Exile
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Hey, Wil~ Loved the SNZ's, loved your composition, liked your idea about doing a 'Stand By Me' commentary. I was a little dismayed, however, that you referred negatively to 'Knitters' as though we could all be lumped together in one Venn diagram-style corral and painted with the same brush. *You* don't like it when people bundle you up under a category ('child actor', for instance) and prejudge you in that way. Don't knitters deserve to be treated as individuals, too? I came to your defense in the comments section of the blog you are referring to; other knitters posted links to your blog and recounted the correct story. Which is how I found your blog, enjoyed it, and put In Exile in my 'Links' section after mentioning how glad I was that my son had always reminded me of you, and how I hoped he would continue to do so. I still hope so. But I also hope he will hesitate a moment before condemning people wholesale based on one piece of supposedly identifying information, no matter what perceived slight he may have been dealt in the past by someone bearing a glancing similarity. I hope you will too. We geeks should cut each other a little slack. Eileen
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Hey, Wil~ Loved the SNZ's, loved your composition, liked your idea about doing a 'Stand By Me' commentary. I was a little dismayed, however, that you referred negatively to 'Knitters' as though we could all be lumped together in one Venn diagram-style corral and painted with the same brush. *You* don't like it when people bundle you up under a category ('child actor', for instance) and prejudge you in that way. Don't knitters deserve to be treated as individuals, too? I came to your defense in the comments section of the blog you are referring to; other knitters posted links to your blog and recounted the correct story. Which is how I found your blog, enjoyed it, and put In Exile in my 'Links' section after mentioning how glad I was that my son had always reminded me of you, and how I hoped he would continue to do so. I still hope so. But I also hope he will hesitate a moment before condemning people wholesale based on one piece of supposedly identifying information, no matter what perceived slight he may have been dealt in the past by someone bearing a glancing similarity. I hope you will too. We geeks should cut each other a little slack. Eileen
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