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There's a period after "car" so I think it's short for "carriage." In olden times they did weird abvtn, like Chas., Wm., and Wil.
Toggle Commented Feb 21, 2010 on Your Saturday Moment of Zen. at WWdN: In Exile
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Back on topic: I've told someone recently that I get to play house with my bestest friend. This old post and others like it show that you have something pretty much like that. Congratulations.
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Wil, Sorry to go so completely off topic, but I thought you might want to know about this. Shinyung Oh is something of a legend in the legal community, or at least that portion of it that follows Above the Law. Here's why: http://abovethelaw.com/2008/05/paul_hastings_farewell_email_a.php and here's when her identity became public: http://abovethelaw.com/2008/05/meet_shinyung_oh_of_paul_hasti.php Well, she has been trying to reinvent herself as a writer, using, in part, her blog: http://shinyungoh.blogspot.com/ (As I see it, when she wrote her famous e-mail, she was choosing truth as a career.) That common thread of reinvention should help to explain why I'm telling you about Shinyung Oh. But if you read the last couple of entries in her blog you'll know why I'm telling you now. She needs a motto like yours. The jerks are getting her down.
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Might just have to get that there cookbook. Regarding Trader Joe's, though, while it's a great place for ingredients, and while most of their prepackaged frozen food is good and fun, we did get one bag of frozen Asian chicken chunks that was downright nasty. Something about the cut of meat. We couldn't even finish it. Otherwise, never a problem with Trader Joe's.
Toggle Commented Jan 6, 2009 on i really love trader joe's at WWdN: In Exile
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@Keikan300, Read Founding Brothers. Also search "alien and sedition acts." Some elections have been much better than others, but in the beginning there were vile rumors, intentionally spread, accusations of treason against anyone who disagreed with the president, etc.. In some fledgling democracies since the USSR fell there have been terrible, bloody riots when the wrong person won. I guess it takes a while to learn that an election that doesn't go your way isn't the end of the world, and that those who didn't vote your way aren't necessarily evil. Apparently we're still working on it.
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@Cassie ST, The most racially integrated White House in history (up until that point); and supposedly he was good for humanitarian aid, etc., in Africa. He's being gracious, so far, in the transition. Does that make up for the bad stuff? No, but you asked... (Also no attacks here since 9/11, although I don't know how much credit goes to GWB for that)
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A p.s. to an already ridiculously long comment (sorry, can't help it): Although the stage was set for the two party system, many of the Founding Fathers (Adams was one, I think) were horrified by its emergence. "Party" was an epithet to them. Of course it seems obvious now that they were being unrealistic. But would the Founding have happened without foolish idealists in the first place?
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@SAL9000, You say, "Humanity evolved to look out for itself, not conscript others for the greater good, or predicate happiness that on the irrelevant or the uncontrollable. External sanction and validation is chasing rainbows." If you're saying that "every man for himself" is our natural and therefore preferable, mode of behavior, and that anything else is delusional, I must disagree. Although it's true that we'd never sleep again if we wailed over every single instance of injustice or suffering, and although you'll likely dismiss me as an Obamabot, I say we could use a little more of "I am my brother's keeper." And regarding your natural selection argument, I submit to you that cooperation within groups contributed to the survival of those groups, perpetuating the genes they had in common. Regarding what you call "external sanction" and similar efforts to influence thought and behavior, that's the point of not only most writing but most communication. If thought and behavior is unchangeable we might as well not say anything. I think you tried to address this apparent contradiction by saying that pointing out liberal fallacies gave you the "warm fuzzies," but are we to believe that the prospect of the merest nudge of persuasion never, even for a nanosecond, occurred to you? Regarding liberal exercises in futility, I'll admit that idealists often fight losing battles, but I think that's better than erring on the side of throwing one's hands up in defeat reflexively. The line between the doable and the futile can only be found through effort. Yes, that can be a prescription for misery. It can make idealists look very foolish (inspiring the occasional LOL). It's certainly not a reliable route to an individual's happiness; in fact, the hope/delusion that things can and should always be made better will to some extent rule out an individual's contentment. But the delusion that we know what's impossible without trying and failing would have ruled out much of what has been accomplished over the past century-and-then-some, seemingly against the odds
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@Mac Guy & Jess, Hear, hear!
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@Teekno, SAL9000, jansob, et al., You are so missing Wil's point. He revealed his darker (yet understandable) thoughts, shared his struggle to follow the better angels of his nature, and, through his friend, appealed to other Democrats to do the same. But you skim over his post in an effort to find something to take issue with, ignoring the surrounding text that qualifies it. You wag your finger at Wil for "harboring" these feelings and don't give him well deserved credit for combating them. Regarding McCain, I just don't know what to think about the man. Was the senator who gave that gracious concession speech the real McCain?
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According to cnn.com it looks like Prop 8 will narrowly pass. To be (more) clear, I would have voted against it, had I been a Californian. Narrow-minded ballot measures that endanger civil rights might be less of a problem, though, if you started with a better separation of church and state: "the State of California will no longer print the words, 'Marriage Certificate.' For anyone. Whether or not you want to call your union a 'marriage' is a religious and cultural question, so it's up to you. We in your government are not in the business of addressing the 'sanctity' of anything." Then, when it sinks in that all that's at issue is the civil rights addressed in a civil union--same thing available to anyone--the yahoos will have less to screech about. That's how I think it might play out, anyway. Morally, I think every church, family, circle of friends, etc., should acknowlege gay marriage, but there may be too many zealots out there to allow for codification of that.
Toggle Commented Nov 5, 2008 on Californians: Vote NO on Prop 8 at WWdN: In Exile
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I had won a coupon for 4 hours of Paid Time Off in a drawing at work, and used it this morning. Arrived at Laurel High School, Laurel, Maryland at 10:30; an election judge said the crowd was extraordinary for that hour. When he arrived at around 6 (polls opened at 7), there were 40 people waiting outside. He estimated there had been a maximum 2 hour wait this morning but admitted the people in line might have disputed that. The workers/judges kept asking if we had any questions and at one point made an announcement about hyphenated names and name changes (make sure you give all info so you don't get rejected) The process was very efficient; although the gymnasium was full of people we got out of there about an hour after arrival. Oh, and we both voted for Obama. I think most of our neighborhood probably did. And now, I wear my little sticker with pride. If it wasn't made of paper I'd stick it to my Obama bumper sticker. My NY friends so far report surprisingly short waits.
Toggle Commented Nov 4, 2008 on one lever, pulled. at WWdN: In Exile
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@Alan, We agree, I think. When I say "The civil union component of marriage is all we should look to government to facilitate...," that's just my way of saying, "in the eyes of the law, the "civil union component" of marriage is labelled "marriage". There is nothing else legally." (your words) It's the official stamp on what is and isn't sacred, and the government endorsement of some sexual relationships and refusal to endorse other consensual sexual relationships that I'm taking issue with. It's none of any government's business, and if voters or officials can't separate the religious/cultural definition of marriage from the legal definition, then the government shouldn't use the word at all, for anyone. To be clear, I'm saying heterosexuals and homosexuals should have exactly the same rights. I'm just saying an emotionally charged word with religious connotations may be unneccessarily getting in the way of that, so maybe government shouldn't use it at all. As a Bill Maher type agnostic, I think religious connotations inject a note of the irrational into our politics.
Toggle Commented Nov 4, 2008 on Californians: Vote NO on Prop 8 at WWdN: In Exile
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Conservatives are concerned about government overreaching, but think government should define marriage, and enforce that definition. Because it's "sacred"--that's the giveaway that we're talking theocracy here. Really, no government-- local, state or federal-- should have anything to do with marriage as a "sacred" institution, defined according to who is having sex with whom. The civil union component of marriage is all we should look to government to facilitate, and it should be available to anyone who wants to form an enduring household and raise children (or not), even if there is no sexual relationship at all (siblings or best friends, for example).
Toggle Commented Nov 3, 2008 on Californians: Vote NO on Prop 8 at WWdN: In Exile
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I imagined that rage was a decision of sorts that Floyd had made a long time ago. He decided that for him the alternative to being dominated is to dominate; the alternative to being afraid is to frighten. He had conditioned himself to be furious at the very sight of someone like Ian--someone much bigger than Floyd, who, in Floyd's inner fantasy, thinks he's superior to, and entitled to dominate, Floyd, and was about to be "taught a lesson." In women like Abby (probably all women), he had conditioned himself to see someone who had allowed herself to be charmed/fooled by the Ians of the world; a repudiation and betrayal of the Floyds of the world (I guess that freaky mommy backstory the BAU members alluded to might work into this). In the run through the woods, he saw not only the infuriating prospect of having to set up a new shop of evil, but the infuriating thought that he was being confronted by a group of people and a situation that wanted to frighten and dominate him, and he wasn't having it. He had installed an inner fear/rage switch many years ago and it wasn't only switched over to rage; that sucker was welded in the rage position. Uh...sorry, didn't mean to freak anybody out...I'm really a nice guy...honest... :-)
Toggle Commented Oct 24, 2008 on Criminal Minds: The Big Day Begins at WWdN: In Exile
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To continue Isisgate1's point, if that's okay: Writing, for instance. If your only objective is to get widely published, and your every word is chosen according to what you think the editor wants it to be, you're not likely (I'd guess) to shine, and even if you do "succeed"...what a bleak, bleak existence.
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Two National Review conservatives endorse Obama: Wick Allison, former publisher of the National Review http://www.dmagazine.com/ME2/dirmod.asp?nm=Core+Pages&type=gen&mod=Core+Pages&tier=3&gid=B33A5C6E2CF04C9596A3EF81822D9F8E Christopher Buckley, back page columnist for the National Review http://www.thedailybeast.com/blogs-and-stories/2008-10-10/the-conservative-case-for-obama
Toggle Commented Oct 10, 2008 on i'm just sayin' at WWdN: In Exile
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Wil said:(Seriously, though, isn't it awesome to live at a moment in history when any creative person with a small budget can make something awesome and freely share it with the world? That wasn't possible as recently as ten years ago.) OhmyGodohmyGodohmyGod, somebody needs to do this: I know it was a bit on Family Guy but it just has to be done. McCain's bizarre reference to Obama--you know the one I mean--cutting right to... come on, think about it, and you'll get there with me... Barack's face on a kite with a flip hairdo... Would it be awesome, or what?!?!?! I'd do it myself if I knew how, but I don't, and I'm telling you it must be done! (or have I just waited too long to eat dinner again?)
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My acid wash denim jacket was cut like a deflated beach ball. And I had bright red socks. And I was in college. I win. :-)
Toggle Commented Oct 7, 2008 on Strewn with time's dead flowers at WWdN: In Exile
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Thanks you sir; I do believe this will help. Wil, do you (or anyone else here) find writing to be, on some level, terrifying? I find two of my main problems are "what" and "when": "Just write" sounds to me like "just say"--just say what? "this is a well designed pen, I wish those people in line here at Starbuck's would keep their voices down, let's see, I'll need to remember dishwashing detergent at the store later"? So at what point have we found the right "what"? How high is the bar? I think this is one reason #4 is so important: if we wait for an idea and opening paragraph that we absolutely know will hook anyone who might see it, we won't get started. Which brings me to "when": announcing "it's writing time, honey! That's what I'll be doing instead of having breakfast with you!" feels like a promise--a tough promise to make until you know you have a killer idea, an awesome first sentence,enough sleep to ensure that you won't zone out for 45 minutes, etc., etc.. I imagine Mrs. Torrence seeing all those pages of "All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy" (I'm thinking she'd feel a bit betrayed even without the mortal fear) I guess the only way to get past this barrier is to close that door and tell yourself that it's time to write...what? Crap. It's time to write what will almost certainly be crap, because we'll need to strap on the hip-boots and wade through it to reach the good stuff. Well. Ahem. I'm...er... I'm...*gulp* I'm going to write today! After years of excuses! I'm going to set a deadline (#2), and think about some milestones (#3), and I'm going to write, even though I could fall back on "I have to back for the trip"! I'm going to put precious time into writing crap. Call it practice or call it delusion, I'm going to do it. And you know what? I'm not even going to tell you the title (#4)!
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Also by the way, I can't believe I didn't know about Fark.com! Just the blurbs are so great I may never work at work again!
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Really, at one time or another, don't we all need a Scalzi-equivalent to bestow upon us a disturbing and vaguely Polynesian version of our prepubescent selves? Hey, that sounded much more profound in my head. Anyway, awesome! Hope the ribs is healing up good. By the way, neither I nor my friends ever hated Wesley. If the writing of the character took an awkward turn now and then, we were annoyed at the writers, not the character, and certainly not the actor.
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p.p.p.s. Correction: top right. Okay, done. Sorry.
Toggle Commented Aug 15, 2008 on various awesome things at WWdN: In Exile
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p.p.s. Wil Wheaton is now, by definition, a bearded geek icon. Therefore the picture at top left is now outdated. Just saying.
Toggle Commented Aug 15, 2008 on various awesome things at WWdN: In Exile
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p.s. I risked the Powers-that-Be-Making-the-Rich-Richer finding out that I read your blog at work by replying to the issuer of the warning in the IT department: "Credit to Wil Wheaton: http://wilwheaton.typepad.com/wwdnbackup/2008/08/various-awesome.html"
Toggle Commented Aug 15, 2008 on various awesome things at WWdN: In Exile
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