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Edna leigh
Hollis Center Maine
Continuing forward always dreaming toward a goal that is mysteriously changing shapes like a mirage--that can be anything I dare to imagine.
Interests: Grandchildren, People, Horses, Trail-riding, trail training, books (Psychology, horses, Terri Goodkind, ones that make you look at something differently--I like movies that do that to), x-country skiing, trail running with my dogs, listening to the stories of friends, being part of the stories of friends, food, learning.
Recent Activity
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Me and the Man backing off the island Sunday. We did a relay to get everyone to and from. No more walking across the ice bridge on the marsh. It's close to shore though but still 1/2 mile to the car. We saw an American Bittern in the cat tails, it flew up into a tree right above our heads so we could get a good long look at it for identification in the bird book. I cannot wait to stay over and hear its unique mating call! We saw a lot of Common Merganser and Canadian geese. There is a goose nesting among the cat tails within sight from the island. I really should carry a camera! Mother and daughter hiking back to the car. She is sometimes sneaky with that fancy IPhone of hers. Back on the farm. Baabra and Curly. Little Moe. Rhoadie, one of the Red Pony Farm Egg Production crew. Hairy the Ram. Continue reading
Posted Apr 18, 2017 at Red Pony Farm: A journey in motion
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February 15 2017 from the end of the driveway. More than a foot of additional snow fell between the two photos. It's melting fast now, and Old Grassy Lake had more water in it than I have seen in my 5 springs since moving here. This gully doesn't hold water once the ground thaws and the melt and spring rain stop flowing in--not even long enough for frogs to find it. But the Muscovy Ducks found it. I was afraid I had lost them when I could not get them out of it Sunday night. They did manage somehow to survive the night with the owls and foxes. Monday at day break they were ready to come in but couldn't remember where the gate back to the inner yard was! I showed them and they rushed into the coop and went straight to bed and didn't come out into the yard for hours! Continue reading
Posted Apr 13, 2017 at Red Pony Farm: A journey in motion
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We love our little farm but it's great to get away too. A 3 hour drive and a 2500 foot hike is all it takes to access our 12 acre wood lot retreat. And the hike in is downhill both ways! Sled in and sled out. Kalwall and with a floor that's just 50 square feet--so no permit needed. The wood stove keeps it quite warm and with the sleeping loft overhead there really is enough room. It's amazing what you can do with free stuff. The composting toilet has 3 glass walls with fabulous views. the hot tub can be seen in the foreground (an old cast iron tub with a fire pit beneath it) A single solar panel and a truck battery provide power for a string of lights and a TV/DVD player for watching a movie from the local library. The sledding was epic this particular weekend. Trekking out to check on the spring. It's a bit of a hike through the hardwood. YAY! running water. The best water ever! And then back to the Hot house and more sledding, more relaxing, more conversation without daily live on the farm interruptions. Peace and quite except for the... Continue reading
Posted Mar 23, 2017 at Red Pony Farm: A journey in motion
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The little Lambs are growing! If you wonder why it looks like Baarbara's wool is falling off, it's because it is. Only it's not wool. She is a hair sheep and has no wool--just hair. She grows a very thick coat of winter hair that is falling out in clumps now that the days are getting longer. Continue reading
Posted Mar 23, 2017 at Red Pony Farm: A journey in motion
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Larry, Curly, and Moe 10 days old. named in order of birth. two girls first and the third a boy. In the photo they are Curly, Moe and Larry left to right. At about 26 days old. At about 37 days old. Hairy the Ram meeting Bessy. Continue reading
Posted Feb 23, 2017 at Red Pony Farm: A journey in motion
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Merry Dog wrapped in a wool sweater and hat sits by the fire warming up after she was rescued from an unplanned dip in the icy pond. This is one of the treasures we found in the cabin, along with the antique Mr. Potato-head, a deed from the 1800's and oh so much junk! it's great for warm up breaks while we work to clear out the cabin and insulate the floor before installing the new wood stove. We had hauled out the insulation on a sled for the job that day. This is the hole that opened up from the current of the brook swelled with rain and melt off during our extreme and prolonged January Thaw this year. The hole that Merry dog got too close to. Though the water is only about 4 - 4 1/2 feet deep she could not get purchase enough to haul herself out and within 4 minutes had lost the ability to get her front legs up on the ice and was finding it hard just to tread water. The man had found a rope and I grabbed a 5 foot plastic sled with the 4 pieces of 2" x 8' rigid... Continue reading
Posted Jan 26, 2017 at Red Pony Farm: A journey in motion
I lost my camera! I've been looking for days. Our very first lamb birth and no camera. I don't have an I Phone. Maybe I can link to my daughters photos? https://www.instagram.com/raysflora/ They are Red with a few white spots they were born early evening Monday night so I got to watch it all. It was so very hard to watch #2 way off in the corner trying to climb the wall, gooey sack hanging over her eyes and back, bleating intently. Momma was busy with #1 and still in labor. She made deep low sounds but the tiny thing didn't change her course up the wall in the corner 10 feet away! I had to leave after 20 minutes of that. I didn't dare intervene and I knew it was not a desperate situation till after an hour or so. I came back in 30 minutes and she was with Momma and sister getting cleaned up and finding her first milk. #3 (the little ram) came 2 hours later. I would check on them several times until I saw the After-birth had passed and the little ones had found the warm bed under the heat lamp, then I slept.... Continue reading
Posted Jan 20, 2017 at Red Pony Farm: A journey in motion
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This is the driveway paddleway to our newly acquired Island paradise. It's very secluded with wildlife Management area on one side and a single owner on the other side of this ~mile long rather river like pond of shallow waters. Besides our little cabin there is one other home on the pond. Nearly all the banks are nicely sloped. I think it adds to the quite on the pond. It's seems as though the sounds of civilization flow by over our heads and we are undisturbed. It should mean some excellent sledding this winter and I do not mean the motorized version. Although the trees are rather dense in these photos there are some spots that have a more welcoming feel for navigating in the plastic sled. The landing. this is the inlet end of the pond which is also the shallowest. there is a tree down over the water as the inlet narrows quite a ways upstream (left in the photo) blocking passage by kayak. It is kind of interesting that the inlet is a brook which runs very close to Red Pony Farm. We spent a lovely fall afternoon on our new Island recently. We just discovered the... Continue reading
Posted Dec 2, 2016 at Red Pony Farm: A journey in motion
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Bessy arrived Saturday from the farm in Paris ME. She is caked in mud but otherwise fine. She weighs just 400 pounds apparently. I would have guessed 300 tops. But what do I know? She stood and stared during our visits for two days and only ate / drank when alone. Raych attempted to get her used to people companions by making herself small. She was able to get a few nose pats in. This morning Bessy is much less tense. She is eating more and drinking more. She was curious about the muck bucket and fork and came right over and sniffed them. I told her she will be amazed at what a great back-scratcher the plastic fork will make. She is not ready for that just yet. She did let me rub her neck and shoulder all through her breakfast of Opti-Calf grain. I was glad to see that she is not depressed today; this I judged when I brought the bucket of fresh water in and she kicked up her heels as she skittered off to the back of the stall. It seemed a lot like frolicking to me. Once she is halter broke she can go... Continue reading
Posted Nov 22, 2016 at Red Pony Farm: A journey in motion
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We took a trip on the Conway Scenic Railway Monday. It was an unusually gorgeous day in October for a train ride. We rode first class but spent an hour or so in the open car. There is a dome car too but that sells out a year in advance. You can see the line in the trees slanting along the slope to the right and disappearing at the back of the notch, that's the railway back to Conway. For more pics and details: The Notch train Continue reading
Posted Oct 20, 2016 at Red Pony Farm: A journey in motion
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Flopsy Mopsy and in the middle the Big Bopper. Mr Black Jack and I think Kevin with Hairy in the back ground. They ar Katahdin/ Dorper/ Tunis. This is Baaabara's backside. She is Katahdin and was expected to give birth in September. It's now Oct 20th and she is finally getting bigger but no babies yet. We think maybe she didn't get bred till she went in with our boys in July. Their will be baby pics --maybe for Christmas. The ducks, Quackers and company patiently waiting for the pond to be cleaned. Yipee! clean water! We managed to grow some pumpkins though it took a lot of extra sprinkler time and electricity running the pump. Continue reading
Posted Oct 20, 2016 at Red Pony Farm: A journey in motion
We are in the negotiation phase of leasing a chunk of land to a solar farm association. It's sort of scary as there are so few. I would really love to hear form someone out there in any state who has done this. I'll be updating on the progress. Continue reading
Posted Oct 12, 2016 at Red Pony Farm: A journey in motion
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We enjoyed him for 5 years, independent nocturnal barker that he was. He was so full of fun and cuddle. He loved everyone but kept his tongue to himself (unlike Merry Dog). then one day he got a limp in his left front leg. He had the form of cancer that eats away at bone and metastasizes rather quickly. He was less than 2 months from little limp to high doses of two painkillers was not allowing weight bearing. We buried him next to the oak sisters not far from the fire pit where we gather on summer evenings. Merry Dog greeting Av when he came home from an long day at Clinic. One of their last nights together. It's been really great getting to know Merry Dog as an only dog. One of the best discoveries is that we could tell her not to eat the chickens and ducks and she just stopped. That had never worked when she was 1/2 of the Av / Merry team. She doesn't harass the sheep either. We were very amused to discover that she jumps over the three foot wire mesh fence with the electric rope topper (which is off on most... Continue reading
Posted Sep 30, 2016 at Red Pony Farm: A journey in motion
. . .and it makes me a bit sad. She worked hard all the time I knew her to reduce calories, eliminate fats and cholesterol and get enough exercise. She had quadruple bi-pass surgery before she was 55 and died of a massive heart attach 9 years later. It never occurred to her or us or her doctor that she may have been doing it wrong. We had all so completely bought into the Diet -heart hypothesis that we believed it had to be something in her genes. But as I am discovering the whole story through several books I have read and am reading this year I understand how hypothesis can become Dogma and how a whole nation can change it's way of eating based on misinformation and fail to question any of it in the face of increasing levels nation wide ill-health. But rather than get angry I feel the best response is to be be grateful and to spread the word. Here are a few facts that will change your life. Eating Fat will NOT make us fat. Eating cholesterol will not increase your risk of heart disease, but may well protect your brain from Alzheimer's. The... Continue reading
Posted Sep 23, 2016 at Red Pony Farm: A journey in motion
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She is Hereford / Angus. She will be weaned in October (by the current owner) and Delivered to Red Pony Farm in November. She will be tamed over winter (by us) and she will not hurt anyone. She will be turned out to graze on the little farm for the grass growing season 2017. She will be processed when the grass stops growing. This is the plan. Continue reading
Posted Sep 19, 2016 at Red Pony Farm: A journey in motion
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The 2016 lambs arrived at RPF Sunday. They will remain in the barn for a few days. We will let them out on the pasture when someone is around all day to see that they don't climb the fence or squeeze between the rungs of the gates. They are bigger than the Southdown we had last year for sure. They came from Callahan Farm in Northfield VT. They will live a very happy 4 -ish months with us before being sold as naturally raised mostly grass fed (some grain) lamb. Continue reading
Posted May 3, 2016 at Red Pony Farm: A journey in motion
I neglected to take a photo of the steer we had on the farm for several weeks this spring. He was ~600 pounds of attitude who was reported to be "semi-halter broke". He was about a year old and the last of a local small herd dispersal, and his price tag was less than a dollar a pound. He was Angus / Shorthorn/ Gelbvieh. He was black with a white jaw that the gal who delivered him said made him look just like the Joker. I should have known then what I was in for as she left wishing me luck with this one. My experience with Bovine is limited. Betsy aka Holy Cow, who I planned to keep as a pet to produce edible offspring--but who kept producing salable heifers, her daughter Ghirardelli, her next daughter Gracie who I didn't get a picture of and who I traded for a bull calf named Echo who died unexpectedly--thus ending my first raising beef experience. Anyway Betsy had been out to pasture for several years and didn't really like the idea of being contained and handled again at first. But after a week of being tied and groomed she loved the... Continue reading
Posted Aug 27, 2015 at Red Pony Farm: A journey in motion
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We have 3 Pennsylvania pink pigs this year and I made a much larger pen for them. ~150' x 100' then the little one we kept two in last year from mid May through October which was only 12' x 35'-ish. In the small pen I did a lot of shoveling and mucking out and it still got right stinky. I have heard that letting the pigs run around in a large area will make the meat tough. But I LOVE the cleanliness of the larger pen. No mucking! This pen is soil that is so sandy we have to add water daily to the mud hole or there wouldn't be one. I like that the pigs have so much fun rooting and romping and choosing to bask in the sun or sprawl in the shade, wallow in the mud hole and coat themselves with thick black mud against the biting flies, dug a nest in the sand to lounge in, or shove themselves under the rubber mats in the run-in shed. They graze on grass and weeds. They eat Poulin Pig feed. They eat our home grown tomatoes and Squashes every day and other bits of vegetable and fruit... Continue reading
Posted Aug 27, 2015 at Red Pony Farm: A journey in motion
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There are no more horses on the farm. The most fabulous opportunity came along for Hot Spot (the last of the horses and the one I thought might be around for a while cause he couldn't just go to anyone!) henceforth known as Hennessy--yes after the cognac. He will have the best of everything from now on--a lovely field and a sweet mare as a companion. His work load will be light and he will summer in Maine and Winter in the Carolina's. That will be much more to his liking as he was a PA boy until he was 11 and needed his heavy PJs when the temp dipped low as it does often during winter in Maine. Here he is in his new home in western Maine taken near the end of April 2015. At the new Old Grassy Farm (formally known as Red Pony Farm) we will focus on back yard beef, Corn Grass fermented barley and squash fed pork (no twinkies and day old bread!), grass fed grain finished lamb, and maybe chickens we'll see. The goal is to have no critters in the barn to care for during winter, so that we can travel, and... Continue reading
Posted Aug 11, 2015 at Red Pony Farm: A journey in motion
As most of you know I have been through a lot of changes in the last 4 years. I have been recreating myself and exploring the possibilities: Could I own my own home as a single person? Yup. Could I create pasture and afford to keep my two horses and the cow? Well, I could turn 9 acres of forest to pasture and I could work hard enough to keep the animals--but it wasn't much fun and I wasn't much fun either. Not sustainable. I sold the cow. Still working harder than I liked. So last year I tried giving up the weekend work, I sold one of two horses and brought in two boarders. We had a cold and snowy winter. I hurt my back twice. Chipping manure from the frozen ground every day was not sustainable for me and I am not investing in the machinery to do the work. I don't find the the pleasure I get from riding is worth the work--especially when the snow comes twice a week and involves 4 hours of snow blowing and a at least 2 more shoveling. My interests are in spending less money, working less hard, playing lots more,... Continue reading
Posted Mar 11, 2015 at Red Pony Farm: A journey in motion
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This past summer in June I discovered a lump near my horses wither. My first thought--Ouch that looks like a nasty horsefly bite lump. It was much different than any I have ever seen in 30 plus years of horses. It was maybe just a tad larger than a pencil eraser and stuck up about 3/4 or an inch. It was hard. It was in the skin, not attached to anything deeper. The hair was still on it. There was no scab, there was no indication that I could see of a bite mark--nothing like a tick would leave or a bee sting would leave behind. there was no other swelling outside the eraser sized protrusion. Knowing what I know now, I wish I had taken a picture then, in order to give readers something to go by if you happen to be here because your horse has a strange little lump you are researching. Anyway as it wasn't sensitive to the touch and didn't interfere with the saddle I rode the day I found it and serval times over the coming weeks. Then I noticed one day the lump became hairless and as I was rubbing My horse reacted... Continue reading
Posted Jan 20, 2015 at Red Pony Farm: A journey in motion
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Little Hooty the Owl was sitting in the dark in the middle of the break down lane of a busy roadway last night with heavy traffic whizzing by. She /He didn't appear to be broken—just standing there a bit hunkered down turning its head from side to side in no apparent concern for anything. It was blinking left eye more than right eye (this is significant I later learned). I almost didn’t see the owl. But something made me turn around and go back thinking: “could that have been an owl?” It was. And it was not afraid of my car pulling up close to illuminate it with my headlights. I took off my jacket and the bird did not offer to defend itself against the coat sack scooping it up. It only shifted slightly in my arms on the way back to the car. I held the coat closed and drove home with one hand—it wasn’t far. I put it in a cardboard box and called 911 to be put through to the game warden. I was told someone would contact me at 9: AM to pick it up. I was told to leave the box somewhere it could... Continue reading
Posted Jan 15, 2015 at Red Pony Farm: A journey in motion
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One evening about a week ago when I brought the horses into the barn I found the Arab / Saddlebred with this big sweating patch on her rump. It was sore to the touch but no apparent injury. The temps outside were near zero F. but the frost melted shortly once in the barn but the sweating continued. I blanketed her when I turned her out next morning to protect the wet area from frost bite. I have not seem anything like it in 30 years of life with horses. The vet examined her and she had not seen this either with no apparent injury in a horse who is turned out in her paddock alone each day. The horse received Banamine for 3 days and then Previcox for 3 days. The sweating was gone in 3 days and no longer seemed sore. Has anyone in the blogosphere seen anything like this? Continue reading
Posted Jan 14, 2015 at Red Pony Farm: A journey in motion
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We got just enough snow overnight to gum up the ice--YAY!! we have had a lot of rain this week with temps just about at freezing it was falling on top of ice and snow so it just made more ice. As I was dealing with horses on icy ground I decided to do a search on line to see what is out there for advice. There is very little information that is helpful. I found this: Iron Shoes on Ice which advocates for not leading or being close to horses that are navigating ice. It also mentions studs on the shoes-- another good idea. I found a couple of videos that had helpful information about how to keep you safe on ice without the horse. Having to do with core fitness and balance, also treads that give one the least amount of contact with the ice as possible and it shows examples. While I was at it enjoyed this video from Sweden it shows racing on snow / ice and shows you the special shoes those races wear. If your horse is shod or barefoot snow packed hard into the hoof can create balls for the horse to have... Continue reading
Posted Dec 12, 2014 at Red Pony Farm: A journey in motion
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We have had frosts at night and temps into the 90s during the day during the last 2-3 weeks. But not near enough rain. However, the Hay season in southern Maine has been wonderful overall. Many hay farmers got a full 3 crops of hay in this year. My pastures are not quite bowls of dust yet. The soil is very sandy here and we are making new soil to add as fast as we can by mixing and composting the horse manure, mulch hay, composted cow manure and loam. This is the second growing season since It was stumped and seeded. It is the first year of being grazed and bush hogged to keep the weeds from seeding. I am not dissatified. It needs improving but each year it will get a bit better. And I do like the dryness for the health of the horses hooves. This picture was taken Sep 20th by my daughter who came and stayed at the farm so we could be at the Common Ground fair. This one was taken mid August: And this is aforementioned Daughter taking a selfie with the new boarder Sep 20: And a Smiling Pink Piggy Named Five... Continue reading
Posted Oct 7, 2014 at Red Pony Farm: A journey in motion