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Rick Stamm
Lancaster, PA
Supporting teams and team leaders since 1986.
Recent Activity
Perhaps one of the greatest barriers to great relationships and high trust in the workplace is mis-understood intentions. And the reason for this is simple. We cannot see intentions, we only see behavior, or hear words. Continue reading
Posted Oct 4, 2016 at The Story Of Trust
Forgive and Forget is the way I have always heard it. But is that the best approach when you are trying to build trust in a workplace relationship, or anywhere for that matter? Continue reading
Posted Oct 3, 2016 at The Story Of Trust
In our work with teams we often find communication problems which are rooted in some occurrence, often years earlier, in which one person said or did something to another person that was hurtful in some way. From that point on the relationship became toxic and communication ceased to be productive. Now we arrive and bring the team together for a team-building session of some type. In the course of that meeting we discover the relationship issue. What to do? Continue reading
Posted Oct 1, 2016 at The Story Of Trust
In the previous project, Project 24, we took a deep dive into personal affirmations. Once again it is time to capture a bit of the conversation on a small reminder card to be reviewed on a regular basis. This time it is the I CAN card. If I had to boil AiA down into it's most basic components it would be the three reminder cards - I AM, I CAN, and I WILL. The original program had these three cards and three copies of the PATIENCE card - that's it for reminder cards. I think you can tell that Bob... Continue reading
Posted Aug 21, 2016 at Adventures in Attitudes
Affirmations are a big part of Adventures in Attitudes. In this project we took time to explore and create possible affirmations in many areas of our lives. The idea, as Bob puts it, is to “allow your mind to be so consumed by positive declarations that all images of fear, doubt and negative thinking completely disappear”. Continue reading
Posted Mar 20, 2016 at Adventures in Attitudes
The words to take away from this are I AM and I CAN. Simple, but effective. Continue reading
Posted Mar 8, 2016 at Adventures in Attitudes
As I think of all the efforts I have made in my life to change my thinking, I find that the most significant have been those while engaged with others Continue reading
Posted Mar 6, 2016 at Adventures in Attitudes
Our life is primarily controlled by our attitudes - the way we think! Continue reading
Posted Feb 13, 2016 at Adventures in Attitudes
In his inimitable fashion, Bob Conklin simplifies mutual trust and takes us on a thought journey into honesty. Honesty, he says, is the foundation for mutual trust. His path to trust is short and elegant - “You need to be basically honest. Honesty crops out into sincerity. And sincerity is the mold for mutual trust.” Continue reading
Posted Jan 31, 2016 at The Story Of Trust
It is probably not necessary to make a case for the power of trust in relationships of any kind - business, professional, or personal. We use the word a lot and still struggle to understand it, develop it and, when lost, restore it. Bob Conklin, in this vignette ending the unit on Attitude Awareness, writes about mutual trust. It is unfortunate that we allocate no time to discussing his vignettes since they are usually quite powerful and thought-provoking. And this one is no exception. In his inimitable fashion, Bob simplifies mutual trust and takes us on a thought journey into... Continue reading
Posted Jan 31, 2016 at Adventures in Attitudes
Bob Conklin begins this message with a story about a Persian prince who, as a boy, was somewhat crippled. So, he had a statue made of himself standing straight and tall; an image of how he expected to be as he grew up. He would look at that statue every day and say, "that is me, that is how I will become". Continue reading
Posted Apr 4, 2015 at Adventures in Attitudes
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The reason most people fail is that the vast majority of thoughts about themselves and their abilities are negative. They completely overlook all of their positive abilities, talents, and potential. Continue reading
Posted Mar 5, 2015 at Adventures in Attitudes
According to Bob Conklin, your self-image has probably been haphazardly developed over the years by a variety of experiences and accomplishments Continue reading
Posted Mar 4, 2015 at Adventures in Attitudes
As a result of working with Pat Lencioni's team development model I have become intrigued by the impact of vulnerability on trust. The work of Brené Brown seems to support this relationship even though she doesn't use the word "trust". Continue reading
Posted Feb 14, 2015 at The Story Of Trust
As I read this op-ed I immediately related it to the problem of trust and betrayal in the workplace. This "Act of Rigorous Forgiving" is something that needs to be taught and practiced in work settings since they are, in the best sense, a community. We all do things which... Continue reading
Reblogged Feb 12, 2015 at The Story Of Trust
I know it has been a while since I posted. Procrastination is something I need to deal with and it will come up later in the program. But for now, I am back into the journey with an interesting exercise in which each member at my table took a turn sharing the self-image notes from project 20 and then getting feedback from the others in the group. My views of my table mates: Alice - bubbly and confident Rosemary - sense of humor, confident, friendly, successful Karen - confident, friendly, optimistic Two notes I made as they described me were:... Continue reading
Posted Oct 13, 2014 at Adventures in Attitudes
Wow! Good info to use when working with DiSC. http://www.spring.org.uk/2013/08/neuroscience-reveals-the-deep-power-of-human-empathy.php# Continue reading
Reblogged Jul 4, 2014 at Notes to Myself
Good talking points regarding poverty and how we can turn this ship around. http://robertreich.org/post/88708262000# Continue reading
Reblogged Jun 21, 2014 at Notes to Myself
Another book I missed. I like the three "trustor" factors Hurley identifies. It should help people identify what they need to analyze when it comes to trusting another person. It creates the personal environment in which the behaviors I am exploring can then be developed. Continue reading
Reblogged Mar 20, 2014 at The Story Of Trust
Whitney draws on a definition of trust from Webster: “Trust is the belief or confidence in the honesty, integrity, reliability and justice of another person or thing”. Random House offers: “reliance on the integrity, strength, ability, surety, etc., of a person or thing; confidence”. Continue reading
Posted Jan 19, 2014 at The Story Of Trust
It seemed that once the vision was clear to these leaders they really struggled with turning it into something others would follow. Sound like a problem with leadership influence to you? it does to me. Continue reading
Posted Jan 12, 2014 at The Story Of Trust
Sweeny, et al, in Trust and Influence in Combat, point to the impact of organizational structure on an Army leader’s effort to instill trust in those he or she leads. The factors in such an organizational structure could be regulations, cultural norms, and standard operating procedures. They say adding the... Continue reading
Posted Jan 7, 2014 at The Story Of Trust
Rick Stamm is now following Sue Strong
Jan 3, 2014
Trust as vulnerability struck me as being a very practical definition since we often see signs of mistrust on teams such as withholding information or lack of engagement in fulfilling the goals of the team. Continue reading
Posted Jan 3, 2014 at The Story Of Trust
We often think our behaviors are fairly stable. We know who we are and we act consistently, especially in team settings. The problem is that our intentions are not always the actual behavior seen by those around us and, furthermore, our behavior in one situation may be altered in another similar one where the context is different. Continue reading
Posted Sep 18, 2013 at The Story Of Trust