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rjs
denizen of a rural NE Ohio swamp
unencumbered by education, affiliations, beliefs or agenda; im not advocating anything
Recent Activity
whatever Trump bump there was in GDP is going to get whacked when the revisions to international trade data released last week are incorporated: http://www.economicpopulist.org/content/october-trade-deficit-86-revisions-whack-3rd-quarter-gdp-6123 moreover, more than a quarter of the jump in 3rd quarter GDP was inventory building, and October data looks like that will all be given back in the 4th quarter... all that said, there's not a lot in GDP i can see that one could attribute to any president...the biggest contributor to growth in recent months has been auto sales, as people replaced their insured vehicles that were damaged by flooding in southeast Texas...
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we're all so much safer under Pruitt's EPA, don't you think? two weeks ago, they ruled that radiation from a dirty bomb or a nuclear meltdown posed "no harmful health effect", then yesterday they said that water drawn from wells at a hazardous waste site in Puerto Rico was fit for consumption, and today we know longer have to be concerned about air pollution...with all these threats eliminated, our quality of life is just getting better all the time...
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i breed bees for their own sake, no capitalist motive...i haven't sold honey or any bee products in over 30 years...
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wrong title. should be "man loses money, finds forture living alone on a desert island"
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that's true in my experience...neither my wife and i nor many of our liberal friends have children...when we all die off, you'll be stuck with the society the conservatives have made, with no one around to show you how to make it better....
Toggle Commented Jun 28, 2017 on "Are Liberals Dying Out?" at Newmark's Door
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i was amused that someone called him out on that "billions and billions and billions of dollars" -- he would have been right if he had just said billions, but in attempting to embellish his claim, he repeated it, and thus was left with a statement that, taken literally, could not add up to any less than $6 billion dollars, double the actual amount...
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Dodge Dart, circa 63 thru 69, almost never needed repair, but one could disassemble and reassemble them in an afternoon..
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thing is, for 8 years, half the country was thinking that the more Obama fails, the better off they'd be...
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in the 60s, i flew everywhere in the US on standby...i can't recall how much i paid, but it couldn't have been much becasuse i was never employed...i would have to bet that it was less than Greyhound...
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ok, while using natural gas has reduced our CO2 emissions, fugitive methane releases from fracking have increased our methane emissions, and methane is a much worse greenhouse gas...and just this wednesday, Trump's EPA rolled back the regulations that required oil and gas companies to detect and repair leaks of methane at fracking sites...
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and because defense is 54% of discretionary spending, all that would probably increase the deficit anyway..
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take it one provision of Ryan's bill at a time...for instance, Portman of Ohio supports Kasich's Medicaid expansion, so he would vote against the Medicaid phaseout in the AHCA...finding two more should be easy...
Toggle Commented May 8, 2017 on Links for 05-08-17 at Economist's View
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A conversation about the Fed’s balance sheet at FT Alphaville - https://ftalphaville.ft.com/2017/04/28/2187827/a-conversation-about-the-feds-balance-sheet/
Toggle Commented Apr 28, 2017 on Links for 04-28-17 at Economist's View
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trouble is, at today's $3.00 per mmBTU, they can't afford to drill, baby, drill...
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US consumer price index for dairy products, 1935 to March 2017: https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/CUUR0000SEFJ 1982-1984=100 they've also got 'milk, cheese and egg' indexes for dozens of other countries: https://fred.stlouisfed.org/search?st=consumer+price+index+dairy
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he can approve it all he wants, it ain't gonna get built...as i wrote a few weeks ago, "it seems certain that oil prices at these levels make it extremely unlikely that Transcanada can continue to pursue the Keystone XL pipeline, simply because oil sands expansion is out of the question at these price levels...because they have to burn one barrel of oil to extract three, the breakeven cost for extracting oil from Canada’s tar sands is much higher than most other places around the world; most figures i've seen indicate they need $50 US oil prices just to operate the extraction facilities now in existence, without any expansion...Keystone was originally proposed at a time when oil prices were twice what they are now., but 64 of the tar sands projects that were on the drawing board when oil prices first started falling have since been cancelled, with many of of the oil companies involved taking large losses, so the oil that was to fill the Keystone will no longer be there if the pipeline were to be completed...about a year ago, IHS estimated that a new greenfield oil sands mine (without an upgrader) required a WTI price between $85 to $95 per barrel on average to breakeven...a month ago, petrogeologist and oil analyst Art Berman at oilprice.com also showed that it would take at least $85 oil prices for 10 years to develop enough new oil sand projects to fill the Keystone XL…furthermore, there are already two massive Canadian tar sands pipeline projects already approved, which would ship any new dilbit production to the west coast and to the east...the major oil companies see the writing on the wall; just this week, Shell decided to divest nearly all of its Canadian oil sands interests in exchange for $7.25 billion, and Marathon announced an agreement to sell its Canadian subsidiary, including their interest in the Athabasca Oil Sands, and use the proceeds to buy Permian basin assets in Texas...all the deep pocketed major oil companies are getting out of the oil sands, and the small companies left with an interest there do not have the capital wherewithal to expand..." links for all that are here: http://focusonfracking.blogspot.com/2017/03/oil-price-breaks-as-crude-supplies-hit.html
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it's obvious that Conway was reading about the wikileaks release of the CIA's Vault 7, which shows they have the capability of remotely turning over the counter smart phones and TVs into spying devices...the release was widely covered in the foreign press, not so much here.. http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/wikileaks-cia-what-are-they-explained-vault-7-year-zero-julian-assange-secrets-a7616826.html 1) The CIA has the ability to break into Android and iPhone handsets, and all kinds of computers. The US intelligence agency has been involved in a concerted effort to write various kinds of malware to spy on just about every piece of electronic equipment that people use. That includes iPhones, Androids and computers running Windows, macOS and Linux. 2) Doing so would make apps like Signal, Telegram and WhatsApp entirely insecure Encrypted messaging apps are only as secure as the device they are used on – if an operating system is compromised, then the messages can be read before they encrypted and sent to the other user. WikiLeaks claims that has happened, potentially meaning that messages have been compromised even if all of the usual precautions had been taken. 3) The CIA could use smart TVs to listen in on conversations that happened around them. One of the most eye-catching programmes detailed in the documents is "Weeping Angel". That allows intelligence agencies to install special software that allows TVs to be turned into listening devices – so that even when they appear to be switched off, they're actually on. 4) The agency explored hacking into cars and crashing them, allowing 'nearly undetectable assassinations' 5) The CIA hid vulnerabilities that could be used by hackers from other countries or governments Such bugs were found in the biggest consumer electronics in the world, including phones and computers made Apple, Google and Microsoft. But those companies didn't get the chance to fix those exploits because the agency kept them secret in order to keep using them, the documents suggest. 6) More information is coming. The documents have still not been looked through entirely. There are 8,378 pages of files, some of which have already been analysed but many of which hasn't. When taken together, those "Vault 7" leaks will make up the biggest intelligence publication in history, WikiLeaks claimed.
Toggle Commented Mar 14, 2017 on Links for 03-14-17 at Economist's View
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except for the 58,000 construction workers put on the job early this year because of a record warm February, the employment report was mediocre...meanwhile, every other January metric was negative on a real basis, with real PCE down 0.3%...Q1 GDP will be lousy.
Toggle Commented Mar 13, 2017 on Fed Watch: Green Light at Economist's View
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a lot of Trump's appointments are like that; for instance, he appointed Rick Perry, who wanted to abolish the Energy Dept, as Secretary of Energy...so if he could have found someone who opposed the law of demand, he'd have been a shoo-in for Secretary of Commerce...
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we don't have a debt crisis. the growth of the economy is restricted by a shortage of safe financial assets. therefore, we should be issuing more Treasuries, not redeeming those in existence.
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re "it would be good for him to discuss the basis for his certainty and the assumptions underlying it." he owns it; worked on it during the Clintom administration.
Toggle Commented Feb 21, 2017 on Links for 02-21-17 at Economist's View
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don't demean Obama's accomplishments...during his term, he had more strokes with a sand wedge than any US president in history...
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glad you understood, given my lousy job of explaining it...
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there was not really an increase in the EPOP, December's was in error; there was an annual revision in the population figures that left January with 660,000 less of us than in December...the number employed, unrevised, fell by 30,000... http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.a.htm
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