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rjs
denizen of a rural NE Ohio swamp
unencumbered by education, affiliations, beliefs or agenda; im not advocating anything
Recent Activity
Feldstein says the yardstick is broke...but it's the same yardstick we've been using for years before...so growth - the change from period to period - already reflects that, and whether the absolute numbers are accurate or not doesnt matter as long as we have some kind of measuring stick, no matter how defective, to compare one period to another...
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Links for 05-20-15 at Economist's View
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as a percentage of the labor force, it's been bouncing around at a record low for a while...it does not get any better than this...
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my comment was more facetious than it was meant to be an economic analysis, inspired by your suggestion that gas retailers would only pass 9 cents of a 10 cent tax increase on to consumers...i'd suggest however, that they're more likely to maintain whatever percentage margin that they figure they need to be profitable; as we've often seen them do when their cost of product increases...i've observed that they raise their prices as soon as futures prices increase, irregardless of the cost of the gas they have already purchased at wholesale; but when exchange prices are going the other way, their response is not so rapid...
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RE: "If $0.09 per gallon is passed on to consumers..." better figure it for 11 cents a gallon passed on to consumers
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5.3 planets...probably low because i never fly, rarely drive far
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the total depends on what you count as trees...hundreds of seedlings pop up under my old maples each spring; are those trees? dozens of walnuts sprout too...but they only last until i mow...
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in the field next to me, there's probably an ash tree ten feet in each direction (an old fallow cornfield that had large ash on the borders) - i'd guess that to be close to maximum density...there are 41,328 square miles in Ohio, which is 26,449,920 acres ...ODNR says that by 1997, total forested acreage had nearly doubled to 27% of the state, so say 11,158 square miles are wooded...that gives you 3.11 billion trees in the wooded areas...i leave it to you to check my math and tell us what percentage of those trees are ash...but on first glance, both the state count and NASA count both look suspect...
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around 4 times your normal: http://water.weather.gov/precip/index.php?yday=1428624000&yday_analysis=0&layer%5B%5D=0&layer%5B%5D=1&layer%5B%5D=4&timetype=RECENT&loctype=STATE&units=engl&timeframe=last7days&product=per_normal&loc=stateOH
Toggle Commented Apr 10, 2015 on Photo of the Day at Environmental Economics
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i appear to be a radical who leans left on economic issues..
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meanwhile, American car drivers managed to return to their gas guzzling driving habits...the latest report from the Department of Transportation found that vehicle miles driven increased by 4.9% to 237.4 billion vehicle miles in January over January from a year ago...this means that the 85 month American hiatus brought on by high oil prices in 2008 has ended and we have now set a new record for driving, covering 3.050 trillion miles on U.S. highways in the 12 months ending in January...in a similar vein, 40% of the increase in American's consumption of durable goods in the 4th quarter was for recreational vehicles and equipment...
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http://www.dailykos.com/story/2015/03/29/1374217/-fracking-and-the-Trans-Pacific-Partnership-et-al (mostly on the investor-state settlement provisions of the trade agreement)
Toggle Commented Apr 5, 2015 on Links for 04-05-15 at Economist's View
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does a higher price for water imply maximum utility, or just more fracked oil wells than planted lettuce rows?
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the first version would have been ok with a comma after –0.057 (not that i understand either)
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after 8 years there oughtta be used copies around that someone wants to get rid of...and if there aint, that should tell you something too..
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that was presumably at a time when wealth would buy a larger number of partners...it's not likely that Jamie Dimon or Llyod Blankfien will have a disproportunately larger number of offspring than any one else today, is it?
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on the post “U.S. oil production still surging” by Jim Hamilton at Econbrowser, i asked the question: if oil inventories are at a record high 444.4 million barrels, up 22.2% from the same period a year ago, as your EIA graph shows, then why did we continue to import 7.4 million barrels a day during the last week of February, 89,000 barrels a day more than we imported during the previous week? then i answered it here: http://www.dailykos.com/story/2015/03/09/1369526/-rig-counts-for-February-and-the-week-just-ended-and-what-are-we-gonna-do-with-all-this-oil in a word, contango…
Toggle Commented Mar 9, 2015 on Links for 03-09-15 at Economist's View
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[ The question would be, "why?" I have no idea why this centralizing should increase regulatory efficiency and would want a careful justification. ] the NY Fed is considered by most observers i've read to be captive of Wall Street... ok, that's not very careful, but that's it in a nutshell
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thanks for the cite, Jodi...once i saw it was worse than even i expected, i was just driven to dig it all out...
on Saturday, i dug into the EIA data and found that our refined products exports had more than doubled since fracking started, and that the increase in exports was on barrel basis 60% of the total increase in US oil production over the period...since a lot of that oil is coming to east coast refineries by train, i tied that to government forecasts that we'd see an average of ten derailment bombs a year over the next two decades, and that 200 fatalities were likely when one of them eventually derails in a populated area...with up to 80 unit trains a week from the Bakken, Philidelphia looks like a likely target: http://focusonfracking.blogspot.com/2015/03/60-of-new-us-oil-output-is-being.html
(2) your math seems alright but i'm not sure all that river traffic uses the locks ie, "the equivalent of 51 million truckloads of goods move by river each year." we also have to take the corps of engineers word for it that they need $13 billion
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we had over 10 inches Sunday and as far as i know all Monday activities went on without a hitch...
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if higher gas taxes are meant to reduce future global warming, does that mean the current cuts in gasoline prices will increase future global warming? (SUV and RV sales are already booming, btw)
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an excellent pair of graphs you put together there...
Toggle Commented Jan 30, 2015 on Links for 01-30-15 at Economist's View
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estimates from the American Petroleum Institute are suspect, anyhow...their estimate that it would generate nearly 280,000 jobs in particular... total US employment in gas and oil extraction as of December was just 216,000: http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.t17.htm
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