This is Rob Fields's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Rob Fields's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Rob Fields
Recent Activity
Thanks, Ivy. Really glad to hear you find the content here valuable. Feel free to comment and share your thoughts on the content and the issues raised. In the meantime, be well.
1 reply
No problem. You can check out the show, including my conversation with Janelle here: http://www.boldaslove.us/2010/06/my-wrfb-playlistjune-8-2010-janelle-monae.html Enjoy!
1 reply
Yeah, I'm looking forward to seeing them. Finally. I mean, I think I've missed them every time they've played in NYC. See you there!
1 reply
Yeah, Jay, I think everybody should just get their rest, 'cause it's going to be a long, but exhilarating weekend. See you out there!
1 reply
You raise some good points throughout. At the very least, his presentation certainly gets you thinking about the relationship between compositions and the spaces in which they're performed. Whether or not his theories hold up, I give him credit for trying to connect the dots. Thanks for stopping by!
1 reply
I'll be posting the playlist and the audio file shortly. Thanks for your patience.
1 reply
Thanks, Marissa. Yeah, just really excited for the level of inspiration that she's supplying. She's certainly deserving of all the kudos she's receiving for this effort.
1 reply
Daniela, I hear you. The reference to Sinead O'Connor was an example of someone who did something really risky and ballsy. She took a huge amount of heat for that. Here was a Catholic woman ripping up a photo of the Pope. THAT was brave. Sorry, but after she's copped to as much, I don't believe that Erykah was risking much at all.
1 reply
Vizionheiry, Thanks for your kind comments. Yeah, prior to the session, i was struggling to find a way to contextualize not just the film, but the presence of myself and three other non-film people. When I came upon this notion of post-modern blackness, it all just fell into place. Thanks for stopping by!
1 reply
Rob Fields is now following The Typepad Team
Mar 15, 2010
@ubastiff. I suggest you watch the film again, as you seem to have missed the point. Spooner is not suggesting that race created punk. He was merely shining a light on blacks in the scene.
1 reply
Good points all, Laina. And, believe me, I hear your concerns. Like I said, this blog was started out of those same political and cultural concerns that you're raising. I see no reason why that should ever change. But not to put too fine a point on it: We live within a capitalist system, one that doesn't look like it's going to change anytime soon. I firmly believe that if we are going to change the culture, then we have to ensure that black rock is viable in the marketplace. Remember that band you mentioned at the conference? The one that's critically acclaimed, beloved by audiences, but they still work day jobs? I think that's a little sad. The fact is: How much better would they and their music be if they could devote themselves to it fulltime? How much better and further along would you be? How much further along would I be? Yeah, Ed Jones won a Pulitzer for "The Known World", but it took him 10 years, partly because he was working as an editor of a tax magazine. He didn't have the personal resources to pursue his art and nothing else. There's a cost to that. Yes, corporations have their own objectives. But, I say, where those objectives align with our (and mine!), we should partner for as long as it makes sense. When it no longer does, both parties should go their own way.
Toggle Commented Jan 11, 2010 on Blogging black rock for Converse at Bold As Love
1 reply
That's a fair question, Laina. Honestly, I've been talking to Converse for the past year and they are one of several companies from whom I've been seeking support, not just for the blog, but to get them behind projects that will get help spread the black rock gospel far and wide. That's part of what I do, as an evangelist: I seek new channels through which I can reach new audiences. To be 100% transparent: Yes, I am getting paid by Converse for these five (5) posts. I also get paid for writing that I do on certain other sites, such as TheRoot.com. In fact, I’d love to see this site and my efforts generate money. And more to the point, I care about this so much that I want to be able to do it fulltime. Not on the margins of my life. Therefore, I'd like to find a way to turn this into a business that's self-sustaining, one that does good, i.e., social good. And I believe it can. Folks probably gave Bono a hard time when he started working with the Gap on Product (RED), but it was a great idea to raise money and awareness for a good cause. My point is that corporations can do good. What’s important is that those of us who engage with them have to maintain our integrity and our vision of why we started this in the first place. In my case, it all started here: http://www.boldaslove.us/2007/02/can_black_rock_.html and here http://www.boldaslove.us/2007/02/what_is_black_r.html I believe that the concerns about "selling out" should only arise if my message starts to change. As you've seen in the post, my message hasn't deviated from any anything that I write here. I'm thrilled that Converse is a corporation that is getting the fact that there is a distinct and growing market for this music and culture. If they want to stay relevant, they need to be part of it. In fact, they were one of the major sponsors of the Afro-Punk Tour. The fact is, those of us who care about this community must help shape and define the terms of corporate involvement. That requires that we engage with them. What I don’t believe in, however, is “the poverty=purity” argument. In fact, I believe a couple of things: First, you should be paid in proportion to the value you create for others. Second—and I think I said this in Indiana—to quote Rakim: “without no money, it’s still a wish.” Just like black folks in general, black rock needs allies everywhere. We need support in order to move this thing of ours beyond the fringes of culture. In terms of covering metal, the closest I’ll get to this with Converse is a post on The Bots. This isn’t an ongoing posting situation. More importantly, metal is one of my blind spots, so I invite you to contribute your knowledge and passion on that area here on Boldaslove.us. Seriously, I’d really appreciate you leading the charge in that area. You have a standing invitation to post. Anyway, I hope this addresses your questions and concerns. If not, post another comment and we can discuss further. Thanks, Laina.
Toggle Commented Jan 10, 2010 on Blogging black rock for Converse at Bold As Love
1 reply
Marc: Thanks for co-signing Rana. Looking forward to having her join the Boldaslove.us family of contributors. As for you, I'd be honored to have your contributions as well. Let's take up the details over email. And thanks again!
1 reply
Absolutely! I'd be honored to have your posts. Will email you separately to discuss!
1 reply
Thanks, cliffmoon2! Please spread the word on it to your friends and family. Likewise, if you have 5 minutes, please take the audience survey, if you haven't done so already. Info on that is here: http://www.boldaslove.us/2009/11/give-me-5-minutes-take-the-black-rock-audience-survey.html
1 reply
Thank you for both stopping by and for your kind words. Please feel free to pick up the RSS feed or join the mailing list above.
1 reply
Thank you both, Achali and Vizionheiry, for your comments. You both raise some good points. @Vizionheiry, I hear your desire to DO SOMETHING. Music can be a great way to highlight an issue, a la "We Are The World" or "Stop The Violence." I think Achali also rightly sums up our challenge today, nearly a decade into the 21st century. That is, we've got to start thinking bigger if we're going to fashion solution to what have really grown into systemic problems. In that regard, we need big ideas. However, I do think that the black rock, Afro-punk and URB Alt communities should now, more than ever, be on the lookout for opportunities to build alliances with folks in other communities and across lines the are demarcated by race, gender, sexual orientation, class, etc. It's not going to be our little island of progressive music lovers that moves things forward. Because the issues that affect us affect everyone else. Look at the healthcare debate. So the question that I'll ask is this: How do we effectively move progressive culture into the marketplace in a way that makes it viable long enough to impact things on a broad scale? The marketplace viability issue is huge, since the overarching framework is capitalism. Ideas have to matter in the marketplace in order to survive within such a framework. They say all politics is local, so I'm guessing that a bunch of people/organizations have to start things in their local areas, grow and then link in the middle. It make the elephant edible, that is, it takes something that looks daunting and breaks it down into a more manageable chunk. That's a long way of saying that we have to link with likeminded folks, and they may not all be in black rock. That might be what we need.
1 reply
You're welcome, Curt. Glad to know things went well. Besides the fact that I've known Stacey for years, I thought this was a great example of pooling resources in order to push creative work out into the world. Congrats again, and I'm looking forward to seeing it at its next screening.
1 reply
Thanks, Claudia. You might also like to check out this track that I featured last year: http://www.boldaslove.us/2008/08/listening-post.html Enjoy!
1 reply
Thanks, Tiffany. Will check it out. Thanks for sharing this. Hope you're well. Looking forward to my next trip to ATL!
Toggle Commented Aug 30, 2009 on Two ways to look at white privilege at Bold As Love
1 reply
From what I've been told, it's track #6.
1 reply
Thanks for sharing these, Eric. You are the man with the video cam!
1 reply
Was that you that texted me? On top of not recognizing the 347 #, I had the whole fam with me and there was some slight drama. We'll catch up soon!
1 reply
Thanks, man. Yeah, you've gotta get to NYC. I've heard a lot about you from Bob Davis. Looking forward to hearing your music.
1 reply