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Rossitza Ohridska-Olson
Pompano Beach, FL and Stara Zagora, Bulgaria
Macro-strategist with focus on the business of cultural tourism.
Interests: art, world travel, the future of tourism geographies, the usage of social networks for cultural tourism marketing, arhaelogy, thracology, travel industry, eastern europe
Recent Activity
Thanks Yiva. I believe that Sweden is doing great by attaching itself to the biggest regional brand: Scandinavia. That brand is guarantee for precision and reliability in services and great scenery for nature lovers.
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Thank you Prabir! As it turns out, we have been students in the same time.
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Koe ne e tochno taka? Mnogo neshta se promeniha sled 2008 godina, taka che ne mi stava yasno za kakvo govorite.
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Chere Marie-Charlotte, vous devez trouver les parties interesses dans votre region vous-meme. Si vous analyser la charte, vous pouvez le faire sans beaucoup d'efforts.
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The creative tourism is a form of cultural tourism – it counts on cultural assets to attract travelers to a destination. It is also a form of creative community’s development – by stimulating the creative industries from outside, the local economy improves beyond the profits from tourism. Continue reading
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To my knowledge, there is not a culture related Saint in any other Christian to be celebrated by both Eastern Orthodox believers, Catholic devotees, and atheists alike for more than 10 centuries and across so many countries. Literacy and culture were so important in Eastern Europe during all these years, that portraits of Saints Cyril and Methodius, who created the Cyrillic alphabet were painted over and over again in churches and cathedrals. Their icons received the same devotion as the ones of St. Mary and St. George, and their life stories were told and retold in numerous books. Continue reading
My research and 30+ years in the business are the source of this article, Helena:) Rossitza
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What is important now is not to only analyze the reality, but also to take action to correct it with sound cultural tourism strategy and product development.
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Great blog post about the role of social media and unique cultural experiences in India - the rickshaw culture and the overcrowded roads of the country. I have an observation although. You say: "That's the way to market a destination for tourism, but an important lesson for any other industry as well. If you can create something unique enough, people won't be able to help sharing it with others." Destination marketing for tourism should focus on uniqueness, but should this uniqueness be a nightmarish association to the worst possible travel experience? India has so much positive assets to market - millennial cultural heritage, vibrant life and breathtaking nature landscapes. Why should marketing use the worse of the country? You don't achieve business results with this type awareness, only spreading the information about some unique experience that everybody hates. It is like advising Russia to market itself with the cold of Siberia or Iraq - with the daily terrorist and military attacks. Of course, the best place to freeze to death is in Siberia (not only because of the cold, but because of the poor infrastructure) or the best place is to get killed by roadside bomb is in Iraq, but you would never market these places based on deadly experiences. And,I really don't believe that India's National DMO would agree with you - just see the Incredible!India videos on youtube and you will agree that they are doing just fine advertising the positive assets of the country, not the negative.
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32 out of the 50 featured trip are cultural tourism trips. From them, National Geographic Traveler classifies 22 as cultural, the rest are classified as cultural by the tour operator who organizes them. As I underlined, cultural and creative tourism, are recession resistant. In the 2009 edition of “50 Tours of a Lifetime”, National Geographic lists 22 trips. If we apply their criteria, there still be an increase of 100% over the last year. Continue reading
Yes, you are right - personal experiences are much more effective in travel promotion, although they are not enough. An integrative campaign should include the videos you are talking about + many other initiatives, including trying to enter in the creative city list of UNESCO.
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The ultimate form of cultural tourism – experiencing the creation of cultural values in the creative tourism – continues to be a big trend in destination marketing. The focus is on local arts, crafts, gastronomy, wine culture, and everything that a place can offer. Combined with the brand war between similar places to show their uniqueness, the main element of the tourism product for creative tourism is the local focus. Is this the right approach? Yes and no. Continue reading
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Tour operators and travel agencies offering classical cultural tourism destinations will suffer from the introduction of this device. While the iPhone is a locked device, without the ability to connect when you are abroad, unless you spend a fortune roaming, iPad will come in the end of this month with global GPS and an unlocked SIM card, making it the first global media distribution Wi-FI and 3G device. That means that information will reach the iPad user around the world, making dynamic packaging a breeze. Continue reading
Rossitza Ohridska-Olson is now following The Typepad Team
Mar 15, 2010
Thracian Helmet with Mask, originally uploaded by The Traveling Frog - Rossitza and Stevan Olson. Thracian Helmet with Mask: Amazing photo. National Museum of History, Bulgaria Continue reading
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Cultural travelers travel because they need to unveil something mysterious, something familiar, something…unexpected. They are driven not by prices, but buy deep-rooted need for new experiences or nostalgic familiarity. That is why they spend more money and they travel more often. Their travels are longer in time and distance. This pattern will not change in 2010. What will be different and what will stay the same in 2010? Continue reading
Rossitza Ohridska-Olson is now following Seth Godin
Dec 10, 2009
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Finally my (im)patience is generously rewarded: the Country Brand Index of Future Brand is here. That, on the top of the 2009 edition Nation Brands Index (NBI) by Anholt-GfK Roper, made me jump of joy. They encompass information, which will be my “food for thought” for the weeks to come. You might say that I am partial to the CBI, since I was one of the experts for the 2009 edition. In fact, I will try to prove that I see objectively both Indexes as sources of very valuable information. This combined “sea of knowledge” for professionals like me, is precious when it comes to create strategies for tourism development and destination management. Continue reading
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As a consultant on cultural tourism for the travel industry and a macro-strategist in this field, I always applaud when governments are thinking strategically about this industry. That is why I was extremely excited when during the last month the Bulgarian parliament approved the Strategic Plan for Cultural Tourism Development. Continue reading
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The mission of the Intellect Institute is to research, preserve, enhance experience and promote culture through scientific research, high technology solutions, best business practices, sound marketing and communications systems, and international tourism. The INTELLECT Institute primary goal is to assist disadvantaged communities, organizations and individuals involved in research, preservation and promotion of the cultural heritage and living cultures, enhancing their capacity for productive and sustainable business operations. Continue reading
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When I created a Linkedin.com poll with a question: “Cultural & Creative Tourism: If you have unlimited amount of money and time, which type of destination you will choose?” I expected very different answers from what I obtained. I assumed that more people would prefer to spend their time and money on cultural trips in their own country. Then, less people would prefer well-established cultural tourism destinations outside of their country and the least amount of responders would choose emerging destinations and the most exotic cultural experiences. If we add the fact established by a CIA study that 80% of the world population is born, lives and dies in a 50 miles radius, I assumed much more conservative answers. Well, as you can see, I was completely wrong. Continue reading