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Sadigh Gallery
New York
Recent Activity
Canopic jars were stone and ceramic vessels used for the burial of the viscera removed during mummification. The term, canopic, derives from the misconception that they were connected with the human-headed jars that were worshipped as personifications of the God Osiris by the inhabitants of the ancient Egyptian port of... Continue reading
Posted Jun 27, 2012 at Sadigh Gallery's blog
Here at Sadigh Gallery we carry artifacts from various cultures, sizes varying from micro-sized beads to large basalt statues. Among these antiquities, ancient mosaic panels are the examples of the most decorative artifacts for they remain in great vibrancy of color due to their great durability. Mosaic panels we carry... Continue reading
Posted Jun 25, 2012 at Sadigh Gallery's blog
The Ancient Egyptians kept many animals as household pets, including various birds, cats, dogs, monkeys, baboons, and even mongooses. Some animals, like monkeys, were kept for entertainment, while the others (such as dogs, and raptors like hawks and falcons) to help people hunt for food. It appears that ancient Egyptians... Continue reading
Posted Jun 20, 2012 at Sadigh Gallery's blog
In the ancient Near Eastern world, people created seals to indicate one’s ownership over their properties, much similar to personalized stamps or signatures we use today. There were largely two types of stamps: Stamp seal and Cylinder seal. Stamp seals are in the shape of hemispheres, domes, pyramids or simply... Continue reading
Posted Jun 19, 2012 at Sadigh Gallery's blog
The term “Coffin” is usually applied to the rectangular or anthropoid container in which the Egyptians placed the mummified body, whereas the word “Sarcophagus” (Greek: “Flesh-Eating”) is used to refer only to the stone outer container, invariably encasing one or more coffins. The distinction made between these two items of... Continue reading
Posted Jun 17, 2012 at Sadigh Gallery's blog
The Palette term used to refer to two distinct artifacts: cosmetic and scribal pallets. Cosmetic/ceremonial palettes, usually of siltstone (greywacke), have been found in the form of grave goods in cemeteries as early as the Baldarian period (c. 5500 – 4000 BC). They were used to grind pigments such as... Continue reading
Posted Jun 15, 2012 at Sadigh Gallery's blog
Beginning just before the Predynastic period, Egyptian culture was already beginning to resemble greatly the Pharaonic ages that would soon come after, and rapidly at that. In a transition period of a thousand years (about which little is still known), nearly all the archetypal characteristics appeared, and beginning in 5500... Continue reading
Posted Jun 14, 2012 at Sadigh Gallery's blog
The history of Father’s Day goes back to early twentieth century when it was created to honor male parenting and to complement Mother's Day. Compare to mother’s day it is relatively a new celebration, but it is celebrated world-wide and in many various ways, according to the cultures. As father’s... Continue reading
Posted Jun 13, 2012 at Sadigh Gallery's blog
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Collecting different forms of ancient art is one of the favorite pastimes in the recent era. Some of them even make themselves successful in their profession through this hobby. For the starting collectors, one thing to consider carefully before starting any collection, is to access the most authentic resource. Sadigh... Continue reading
Posted Apr 22, 2011 at Sadigh Gallery's blog
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The term “Coffin” is usually applied to the rectangular or anthropoid container in which the Egyptians placed the mummified body, whereas the word “Sarcophagus” (Greek: “Flesh-Eating”) is used to refer only to the stone outer container, invariably encasing one or more coffins. The distinction made between these two items of... Continue reading
Posted Apr 22, 2011 at Sadigh Gallery's blog
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Luristan bronzes have been prized for their unique designs and fine craftsmanship since antiquity. Geographically, Luristan is the central province in Iran’s western frontier, the area where production of richly decorated bronzes flourished from about 1200 to 800 B.C. The formidable terrain of the region, sweeping plains, and high valleys... Continue reading
Posted Apr 22, 2011 at Sadigh Gallery's blog
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Physicians in the Classical World had access to a variety of medical & surgical instruments that were designed to aid them in their treatment of the sick. Several ancient texts mention the use of surgical tools and instruments used by doctors in antiquity. The precise date when each instrument was... Continue reading
Posted Apr 22, 2011 at Sadigh Gallery's blog
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The Phoenicians were enigmatic people, who left little in the way of written records. Much of what we know of them from ancient times was recorded by Greek and Roman historians who mentioned their seamanship and shrewd business dealings. Napoleon III put modern historians in touch with the Phoenicians. While... Continue reading
Posted Apr 22, 2011 at Sadigh Gallery's blog
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Little is known about the production of glass in the ancient world. One early source, Pliny the Elder (AD 23 – 89), reported the tale of natron (soda) merchants who, when they stopped to prepare a meal, supported their cooking vessels on the beach with blocks from their cargo. The... Continue reading
Posted Apr 22, 2011 at Sadigh Gallery's blog
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The Renaissance of Sumerian culture under the Kings of the third dynasty of Ur (2112 – 2004 BC) saw Mesopotamian bureaucracy and record keeping develop to a peak. The recovery of cast archives from the city states of Sumer such as Puzrish-dagan (modern drehem), Lagash (al hiba), Ur and Umma... Continue reading
Posted Apr 22, 2011 at Sadigh Gallery's blog
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The word “Mesopotamia” is in origin a Greek name (mesos ‘middle’ and potamos ‘river’, so ‘land between the rivers’). The name is used for the area watered by the Euphrates and Tigris and its tributaries, roughly comprising modern Irak and part of Syria. South of modern Baghdad, the alluvial plains... Continue reading
Posted Apr 22, 2011 at Sadigh Gallery's blog
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Cylinder seals were wonderful, small objects that are incised with graphic images and sometimes writings that were the “signature” of dignitaries, officials, and the upper class in the ancient Near East. They are made of hard stones, often black or dark green, but also of Lapis Lazuli, chalcedony, agate, jasper,... Continue reading
Posted Apr 22, 2011 at Sadigh Gallery's blog
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Egyptians believed that the body had to be intact and preserved in order to gain entrance to the Netherworld. Humans, as well as animals, were mummified with great care. In ancient Egypt, hundreds of yards of linen were used to carefully wrap a mummy. The exact arrangement of the rolls... Continue reading
Posted Apr 22, 2011 at Sadigh Gallery's blog
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Collecting different forms of ancient art is one of the favorite pastimes in the recent era. Some of them even make themselves successful in their profession through this hobby. For the starting collectors, one thing to consider carefully before starting any collection, is to access the most authentic resource. Sadigh... Continue reading
Posted Apr 20, 2011 at Sadigh Gallery's blog
Image
The term “Coffin” is usually applied to the rectangular or anthropoid container in which the Egyptians placed the mummified body, whereas the word “Sarcophagus” (Greek: “Flesh-Eating”) is used to refer only to the stone outer container, invariably encasing one or more coffins. The distinction made between these two items of... Continue reading
Posted Apr 20, 2011 at Sadigh Gallery's blog
Image
Luristan bronzes have been prized for their unique designs and fine craftsmanship since antiquity. Geographically, Luristan is the central province in Iran’s western frontier, the area where production of richly decorated bronzes flourished from about 1200 to 800 B.C. The formidable terrain of the region, sweeping plains, and high valleys... Continue reading
Posted Apr 20, 2011 at Sadigh Gallery's blog
Image
Physicians in the Classical World had access to a variety of medical & surgical instruments that were designed to aid them in their treatment of the sick. Several ancient texts mention the use of surgical tools and instruments used by doctors in antiquity. The precise date when each instrument was... Continue reading
Posted Apr 20, 2011 at Sadigh Gallery's blog
Image
The Phoenicians were enigmatic people, who left little in the way of written records. Much of what we know of them from ancient times was recorded by Greek and Roman historians who mentioned their seamanship and shrewd business dealings. Napoleon III put modern historians in touch with the Phoenicians. While... Continue reading
Posted Apr 20, 2011 at Sadigh Gallery's blog
Image
Little is known about the production of glass in the ancient world. One early source, Pliny the Elder (AD 23 – 89), reported the tale of natron (soda) merchants who, when they stopped to prepare a meal, supported their cooking vessels on the beach with blocks from their cargo. The... Continue reading
Posted Apr 20, 2011 at Sadigh Gallery's blog
Image
The Renaissance of Sumerian culture under the Kings of the third dynasty of Ur (2112 – 2004 BC) saw Mesopotamian bureaucracy and record keeping develop to a peak. The recovery of cast archives from the city states of Sumer such as Puzrish-dagan (modern drehem), Lagash (al hiba), Ur and Umma... Continue reading
Posted Apr 20, 2011 at Sadigh Gallery's blog