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SarahRoselinda
San Francisco, California
Recent Activity
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Part of what’s difficult about becoming a parent is deciding the parent we want to be. And once we've decided, sometimes the parent we are and the parent we imagined we would be are different. Continue reading
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Dr Stephanie Stewart is a psychologist and therapist who has developed her own brand of travel therapy, mostly by taking patients on epic surf retreats around the world. She tells us how being present and putting ourselves in new situations can help uncover new insights into our own personal development journey. Continue reading
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Shortly after the birth of my daughter, I spent 10 days locked in the psych ward of the hospital after my postpartum depression and psychosis made me suicidal. In my altered psychotic state, I thought my house was bugged and the police were coming to arrest me for a crime for which I was wrongly accused. I thought the only way out of my crisis was to kill myself, so I told my mom and husband that I was going to go jump off the Golden Gate Bridge. Continue reading
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This is our second and brief interview with Jane Honikman, a founding member of the Postpartum Education for Parents resource (www.sbpep.org) as well as Postpartum Support International (postpartum.net) that includes a telephone support line and partner with Dr Shoshana Bennett in Postpartum Action Institute. Jane gives us an overview and outline for finding ourselves on the spectrum of mental health. Listen to the episode to find out how to identify different parts of the continuum and better understand where you yourself might fall on that spectrum. She talks about her time studying with Dr. James Hamilton who was interested in maternal mental health at a time when it might have seemed as if no one cared or understood, much like today in many women's experience! Continue reading
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Our latest episode's guest is Dr Shoshana Bennett. She helps us bust up some "myths of motherhood." Often, when we acknowledge that all those myths are indeed false ideas, the pressure to be perfect is alleviated and some of the feelings of depression dissipate. Continue reading
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The number one complication of pregnancy is a form of postpartum depression or anxiety. Despite how common it is for women to experience a degree of anxiety or depression associated during pregnancy or post-natally, there are still cases where women aren't receiving the care they need. To help crack the issue wide open, Maureen Fura and her co-producer Jennifer Silliman created a documentary film entitled, The Dark Side Of The Full Moon. Continue reading
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Sara Mauskopf came home from the hospital with a healthy baby. She herself on the other hand, while healthy otherwise, struggled with postpartum depression. With help from her family, friends and professionals, she came out the other side fully recovered. Her experience as a new mom, both because of the depression and in general, helped inspire her to create parenting app Winnie. Be it Winnie or another app or online resource, we encourage parents of all types to seek the information and support they need. And there's no need to wait until after baby is born. While you're expecting is a great time to explore the resources around you for everything from parenting meetups to breastfeeding support to local kid-friendly restaurants and everything else. Continue reading
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On Episode 29 we speak with Marjan Esser who works for a company that specializes in creating foods for parents, babies and toddlers. She shares her wisdom with us and we love the way she describes healthy eating: "Eat Like The Rainbow!". We agree. Don't salads always look more attractive when they have a variety of colors? But don't get us wrong ... healthy eating isn't about eating salads. This is particularly true for expecting moms and post-natal moms. How does eating while pregnant factor into baby's palate? What is the relationship between milk supply and foods? Which foods work well for first solids to try with your 4-6 month old? What nutritious foods are helpful for a recovering new mom? Listen to the show to find out the answers to these questions and more. Continue reading
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Love your body. Love your body for so many reasons. Your body created new life. Your body gave you a baby you love. Your body works hard every day. Your body isn't a girl's body, it is a woman's body. Bodies change after having a baby, and that's okay. By loving your body, you are setting an example for your child that worth comes from who you are, not what you look like. As Jennifer Garner puts it, "From now on ladies, I will have a bump. And it will be my baby bump. And let's just all settle in and get used to it. It's not going anywhere." Continue reading
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Ever wonder about when you'll be able to have sex again after having a baby? Or how your body will feel and heal after giving birth? Curious about how having a baby affects intimacy, sensation and your body in general? Answering these questions for us is Kimberly Johnson. She is a bodyworker, doula, post-partum women’s health specialist, and single mom. Having had a difficult postpartum experience herself, she set out to understand what exactly was going on with her, and to heal herself naturally. Continue reading
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Not all births are "easy births". When there is a traumatic birth experience, where too much happens too fast, a sense of connection between parent and baby can be weakened. Chanti Smith is an expert at human connection. She has worked with people of all ages to strengthen their parental attachment relationships. In particular, the work she does through Somatic Experiencing has helped parents develop a strong sense of connection and attachment with their babies. Any person feeling a "lacking" sensation related to their own birth or the birth of a child is a good candidate for developing stronger attachment and connection. Listen to Episode 26 to learn how. Continue reading
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Jane Honikman gave her first baby up for adoption because she felt pressure to "do things in order". She later finished college, married the father and had additional babies with the same man who is now her husband. Jane described her experience of giving up her first baby as a trauma. Compounding that trauma was the feeling that her second baby, another girl, was severely jaundiced as a kind of karmic punishment for what she'd done with her first baby. The experience triggered tremendous grief and guilt. Jane was not able to recover from her traumas until decades later through therapy. She waited until she was in her fifties to get the help she needed, having felt waves of anxiety and depression throughout her life. Jane encourages women to seek out the help they need as soon as they are able, and not to postpone healing. In our latest episode, we share an outline to help address postpartum anxiety and depression issues. This is relevant for EVERYONE, not just people who are "depressed". Continue reading
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In a word, Ann Jonas is resilient. She incorporates her own sense of spirituality into her coaching work, having experienced the sudden loss of her parents (her father killed her mother and died himself shortly thereafter in jail) and subsequently experienced the loss of her partner when her daughter was only two years old. One of Ann's takeaways from her journey thus far is that "life happens for you, not to you." She uses the metaphor of a car as the way we can look at life. There's a huge front windshield so we can look ahead and look around us. Listen to Ann share how to become the best version of yourself on Episode 24 of the Fourth Trimester Podcast. Continue reading
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Reminiscent of Mexican horchata, this beverage is circulation-boosting, warming, and rich with the lactation-supporting benefits of oats. Here's another recipe to save to your New York Times Recipe Box ;) Continue reading
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Women who don’t meet their personal breastfeeding goals tend to think it is their own fault. It is time for women to stop blaming themselves. Women are starting to learn that difficulty with breastfeeding isn’t their fault, and that oftentimes what is happening is that the hospital environment and modern medical system isn’t setting women up for breastfeeding success. Continue reading
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Nothing makes you grow up quickly like becoming a parent. These treats permit you to feel like a kid again. They are a snap to make and the peanut butter is so much better than the marshmallows found in packaged versions. (Almond or sunflower seed butter are fine substitutions.) Goji berries, raisins, or crunchy-sweet g pieces work great as add-ins. Continue reading
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Having worked with women through all stages of pregnancy, from pre-natal right through postpartum, Susi Hately has observed that a lot of new moms seem resigned to the fact that post-baby body is just ‘the way things are’ – prolapses, dry vaginas, painful sex, leakage, etc. Susi is on our show to help educate expecting mothers on how to take care of their wellbeing during pregnancy, post-partum and beyond. Continue reading
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Dr Monica Hannon is our guest on episode 21 and she shares some of the major issues that mothers and partners face during the first six weeks following the birth of a baby. Find out when it makes sense to pick up the phone and call your doctor. Continue reading
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When it comes to exercise postpartum, the primary message is to take the time you need to heal. Don’t rush to “get your body back” because it is easy to do more harm than good by pushing your body too hard before it is ready. The best thing to do for your body right after having a baby is to rest and recover. There are people out there who want to help you and who have the right tools to help you. It is okay that your body takes time to heal and build strength back. There are smart ways to develop strength and function, such as learning how posture and breathing can help you in everyday activities. When your body is ready, and that could be months or years after giving birth, you can develop a fitness strategy that is appropriate for yourself. Continue reading
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This article debunks some common sleep myths while helping parents to make informed sleep choices that support their parenting philosophy as well as their infant or child's developmental needs. Continue reading
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In the third trimester—or sooner!—make some time to ask each other four essential questions that can help avoid unnecessary stress. You may not have the exact answers, but simply bringing these topics to the table before baby gets here can set the foundation for a strong relationship later. Continue reading
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Episode 18 is the Fourth Trimester Podcast episode that is all about Dads. We talk with an at-home Dad, Andrew Gentry-Law, who shares his personal experiences with newborn twins, and about his work in helping other new dads in their roles as fathers. Listen to hear more about a real life "Dudes Group". Continue reading
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This twist on a classic “first food” for mom may sound strange. Dried fruit in chicken soup, you ask? But go with it: Chinese red dates—also known as jujubes, available at Chinese markets or online—plus ruby-colored goji berries is a time-tested combo used to boost circulation and enhance inner warmth. Your eyes will delight at the look of these little gems in your soup bowl. Your taste buds will love the subtle touch of sweetness against the savory chicken. I recommend making every effort to use Chinese red dates, which bestow amazing postpartum health benefits, as they are not difficult to find online or in local Asian markets. Medjool dates are okay in a pinch but they do not have the same medicinal effects. Continue reading
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What does every new parent need to know for their first few weeks with a new baby? We directly and specifically look at the first days and weeks after baby comes and speaks to the needs of recovering parents and how those dovetail with their baby's. The social-emotional experience and how it is effected is considered thoroughly. Continue reading
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Orange is a color of celebration, ritual, and happiness—a shade that instantly lifts the spirits. This pureed soup is so easy to make from ingredients stocked in your pantry, and it’s a great one to ask a visitor to whip up for you. The slightly sweet taste and grounding properties of kabocha squash are especially comforting on days when you might feel teary or blue, and a generous amount of lubricating oil helps to remedy inner dryness and wind, soothing the nerves further. Serves 8 Continue reading