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Cathie Bird
Pioneer, TN
I'm a citizen scientist, writer, researcher, conscious evolutionary, and psychoanalytic psychotherapist in private practice in Tennessee.
Interests: writing, psychoanalysis, the intersection of science and spirit, spiritual transformation, conscious evolution, my dogs and my cat, earth and life sciences, Qi Gong, listening to music (jazz, blues, classical and bluegrass), other life in this solar system
Recent Activity
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via colorlines.com From the article: “We need diverse books. We need to make them, buy them, read them, review them, talk about them,” award-winning cartoonist Gene Luen Yang told GalleyCat in describing his support for a social media campaign to diversify the publishing world. “Our world is colorful, so our books should be too.” This summer, Yang teamed up with Sonny Liew to release a new graphic novel called “The Shadow Hero,” based on a character named the Green Turtle who was first introduced by in the 1940s by pioneering Chinese-American cartoonist Chu Hing. The Green Turtle has since been... Continue reading
Reblogged yesterday at MicroHawk's NewsScan
Pharmaceuticals and other contaminants from treated municipal wastewater can travel into shallow groundwater following their release to streams, according to a recent USGS study. The research was conducted at Fourmile Creek, a small, wastewater-dominated stream near Des Moines, Iowa. “Water level measurements obtained during this study clearly show that stream levels drive daily trends in groundwater levels. Combined with the detection of pharmaceuticals in groundwater collected several meters away from the stream, these results demonstrate that addition of wastewater to this stream results in unintentional, directed transport of pharmaceuticals into shallow groundwater,” said Paul Bradley, the study’s lead author. via... Continue reading
Reblogged yesterday at MicroHawk's NewsScan
Social movements and collective action have often been studied using newspapers for data. Concerns with newspaper data include selection bias, where a subset of accounts, events, or statements are reported, and description bias, which refers to the veracity of accounts and statements. Bias can be created by intentional or accidental misstatements of events and processes, by type of event selected by journalists, and by characteristics of the reporting entity. In this article, bias and scholarly strategies to address bias are discussed in the context of two West Virginian environmental conflicts; one focuses on mountaintop removal mining and one involves the... Continue reading
Reblogged yesterday at MicroHawk's NewsScan
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via indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com Quote from Michael Brune, Sierra Club: “Indigenous people have been in this fight since right from the beginning,” McKibben told Indian Country Today Media Network. “They’re the ones who first raised the Keystone pipeline fight that became the emblematic fight of this thing. So leaders like Clayton Thomas-Muller or Idle No More—they’re the people who are at the absolute forefront of all we do.” Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com//2014/09/20/indigenous-peoples-essential-climate-movement-march-organizers-say-156977 Continue reading
Reblogged 2 days ago at MicroHawk's NewsScan
The time has come to end hand wringing on climate strategy, particularly controlling carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. We need an approach that builds on national self-interest and spurs a race to the top in low-carbon energy solutions. Our findings here at the IMF—that carbon pricing is practical, raises revenue that permits tax reductions in other areas, and is often in countries’ own interests—should strike a chord at the United Nations Climate Summit in New York next week. Let me explain how. via blog-imfdirect.imf.org Continue reading
Reblogged 3 days ago at MicroHawk's NewsScan
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via www.huffingtonpost.com From the article: An oil boom in Wyoming has a filthy side effect: A string of accidents from a remote gulley in the Powder River Basin to a refinery in downtown Cheyenne already has made this year the state's worst for oil spills since at least 2009, state records show. Continue reading
Reblogged 3 days ago at MicroHawk's NewsScan
More than 500 people showed up at a public hearing held last week at Western Carolina University in Cullowhee, North Carolina to weigh in on proposed rules for fracking in the state. Commenters were overwhelmingly opposed to the controversial natural gas drilling technique -- but not for lack of creative effort on the part of the drilling industry. About 20 people showed up at the hearing wearing turquoise T-shirts that said "Shale Yes North Carolina" -- and at least some of them were bused from a homeless shelter in Winston-Salem. via www.southernstudies.org Continue reading
Reblogged 4 days ago at MicroHawk's NewsScan
Senator Edward J. Markey (D-Mass.) announced this week that he will draft legislation to suspend new lease sales of coal from public lands until the Bureau of Land Management institutes reforms to the federal coal leasing program. This announcement came in response to a letter from the Bureau of Land Management that dismissed Senator Markey’s call for immediate action to change how the agency auctions and sells leases for coal development on public lands. via www.foe.org Continue reading
Reblogged 4 days ago at MicroHawk's NewsScan
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The Winnemem Wintu performed a War Dance at the Shasta Dam, their second in 10 years, September 11-14 to seek guidance from their ancestors as they try to stop a federal plan to raise the Shasta Dam 18.5 feet, which would submerge or damage about 40 sites integral to the tribe’s religion, according to a 2012 study from the Stanford Center on Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity. Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com:81/2014/09/18/stop-damming-indians-dancing-against-shasta-dam-raise-156921 Continue reading
Reblogged 4 days ago at MicroHawk's NewsScan
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via www.propublica.org From the article: Georgetown University history professor Michael Kazin is seated among the students for his class, “U.S. in the 1960s.” He has surrendered his stage today to Dorie Ladner, 72, who is talking with the class about her years in Mississippi working to desegregate buses as a Freedom Rider, and her experiences organizing Freedom Summer in 1964. The names of many of Freedom Summer’s martyrs and survivors flutter by quickly in her lecture. At least twice she mentions the name Marion Barry, an organizer in Mississippi before later becoming mayor of Washington D.C., and it seems to... Continue reading
Reblogged 5 days ago at MicroHawk's NewsScan
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via www.huffingtonpost.com From the article: In October 2012, Superstorm Sandy wreaked major havoc on the United States, causing 117 deaths and leaving $62 billion worth of damage in its wake when it passed through New York and New Jersey. But Sandy wasn't the strongest storm ever to hit that region, and there is the potential for other, much bigger storms to strike, a new report warns. Continue reading
Reblogged 5 days ago at MicroHawk's NewsScan
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RSVP for the Digital Dialogue See related report, Civil Rights, Big Data, and Our Algorithmic Future Continue reading
Posted 5 days ago at MicroHawk's NewsScan
As the United Nations prepares to hold one-day global summit on climate change, we speak to award-winning author Naomi Klein about her new book, "This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate." In the book, Klein details how our neoliberal economic system and our planetary system are now at war. With global emissions at an all-time high, Klein says radical action is needed. "We have not done the things that are necessary to lower emissions because those things fundamentally conflict with deregulated capitalism, the reigning ideology for the entire period we have been struggling to find a way out of this... Continue reading
Reblogged 5 days ago at MicroHawk's NewsScan
NYPD Police Commissioner Bill Bratton announced that an unnamed officer has been suspended and stripped of his badge after being caught on video kicking a street vendor who was in police custody. The scene unfolded after a street fair in Sunset Park, Brooklyn, last Sunday when several vendors reportedly failed to leave the area. The vendors can be seen on the video resisting arrest before one, Jonathan Daza, 22, is ultimately tackled to the ground and kicked by the officer. The police department has not released the officer’s name. via colorlines.com Continue reading
Reblogged 5 days ago at MicroHawk's NewsScan
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via www.huffingtonpost.com Investments to help fight climate change can also spur economic growth, rather than slow it as widely feared, but time is running short for a trillion-dollar shift to transform cities and energy use, an international report said on Tuesday. The study, by former heads of government, business leaders, economists and other experts, said the next 15 years were critical for a bigger shift to clean energies from fossil fuels to combat global warming and cut health bills from pollution. Continue reading
Reblogged 6 days ago at MicroHawk's NewsScan
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via www.huffingtonpost.com From the article: WASHINGTON -- The Environmental Protection Agency announced Tuesday afternoon that it is extending the public comment period for its proposed rules on carbon dioxide emissions from power plants, raising questions about whether the agency will be able to meet the June 2015 deadline President Barack Obama set for finalizing the standards. Continue reading
Reblogged 6 days ago at MicroHawk's NewsScan
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via www.huffingtonpost.com From the article: They had prepared for wildfires and knew of the drought-parched forests, but the inferno that swirled through the California lumber town of Weed moved so quickly all people could do was flee. In just a few hours, wind-driven flames destroyed or damaged 150 structures, a saw mill and a church. At times, the fire moved so fast that residents had only a few minutes to get out of the way. Continue reading
Reblogged 6 days ago at MicroHawk's NewsScan
Police abuses – from fatal shootings through false arrests to the gratuitous use of foul or threatening language – are dismissed as isolated acts of a ‘few bad apples’ instead of as an endemic scourge historically impacting minorities and increasing impacting non-minorities. Top policy-makers and even much of the public embrace this dismissal dynamic. via www.counterpunch.org Continue reading
Reblogged 7 days ago at MicroHawk's NewsScan
In the last few weeks, Harper refused to conduct an inquiry into murdered and missing women or allow the RCMP to release its own investigation until "reviewed" by Canada. The auditor general's recent report criticizes Canada for lack of transparency and adequate funding in First Nation policing, an all too familiar conclusion in most, if not all previous reports, which highlighted chronic underfunding in other areas like housing, water, and education. Even the international community is taking notice of Canada's abrupt governance personality change under Harper. While the United Nations has been consistently critical of Canada's treatment of indigenous peoples,... Continue reading
Reblogged 7 days ago at MicroHawk's NewsScan
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via www.resilience.org From the article: A movement is emerging in many places, under many guises: New Economy (or Economies), Regenerative Economy, Solidarity Economy, Next Economy, Caring Economy, Sharing Economy, Thriving Resilience, Community Resilience, Community Economics, Oppositional Economy, High Road Economy, and other names. It’s a movement to replace the default economy of excess, control, and exploitation with a new economy based on respecting biophysical constraints, preferring decentralization, and supporting mutuality. This movement is a sign of the growing recognition that what often are seen as separate movements—environment, social justice, labor, democracy, indigenous rights—are all deeply interconnected, particularly in the way... Continue reading
Reblogged 7 days ago at MicroHawk's NewsScan
Levels of pesticides continue to be a concern for aquatic life in many of the Nation’s rivers and streams in agricultural and urban areas, according to a new USGS study spanning two decades (1992-2011). Pesticide levels seldom exceeded human health benchmarks. via www.usgs.gov Continue reading
Reblogged 7 days ago at MicroHawk's NewsScan
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via www.startribune.com From the article: Bit by bit, the farm at Little Earth is growing. So, too, is a movement among American Indians in Minnesota and elsewhere to improve their health by rediscovering ancestral foods and connections to lands once lost. Continue reading
Reblogged Sep 15, 2014 at MicroHawk's NewsScan
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via www.truth-out.org From the article: Back in session and gearing up for campaigns before the November midterm elections, the political coverage will likely focus on two aspects of a Congressional race: who will win and who will vote. Continue reading
Reblogged Sep 15, 2014 at Earthbytes
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via www.truth-out.org Frome the article: Does an apple a day really keep the doctor away? Not anymore, according to soil health experts—unless the apple comes from a tree grown in healthy, organic soil. Continue reading
Reblogged Sep 15, 2014 at MicroHawk's NewsScan
The theme of Ayn Rand’s Atlas Shrugged, according to Ms. Rand herself, is “what happens to the world when the Prime Movers go on strike.” The prime movers are corporate executives – “the motor of the world” – and Rand imagines what would happen if they all just went away. To Rand this is nothing less than “a picture of the world with its motor cut off.” Ouch. Paging Dr. Freud. via www.alternet.org Continue reading
Reblogged Sep 15, 2014 at MicroHawk's NewsScan