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Sensi27
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Hey Gang, don't worry Austin is going to be a top ten pick and we won't have a chance to draft him anyway. I see us getting a pass rushing Defensive End to help out Wake in the first round, then a Right Tackle in the 2rd, a MLB in the 2nd, a Tight End in the 3rd, and a WR in the 3rd. A Offensive Guard in the 4th rd. These players would be Bjoerner, his Florida state tackle, and Gators Jon Bostic, Michigan states Sims, Teaxas A & M Ryan Swope, and Connecuit Guard Adam Materson.
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We need a MLB. Still, given his instincts and exceptional ability to drop back into coverage, the chances of Te'o succeeding in the NFL should not be dismissed based on one 40-time. As Clayton notes, St. Louis Rams LB James Laurinaitis ran the same time in his combine effort, and now plays every down in the heart of the Rams' defense. A 5.00-second time posted by current New England Patriots LB Brandon Spikes dropped him to No. 62 overall (h/t Tampa Bay Times), but hasn't stopped him from thriving at the next level.
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Jake Long was smart to sign with the RAMS!!! Why? They run a power blocking scheme, and not a zone blocking scheme, so he will be more comfortable in it, and did not have the feet to run the zone blocking. Look for Incognito & John Jerry to be gone also. They are more power blocking then zone blockers. You will see in the draft how the Dolphins pick up some guards that are Athletic.
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Zone blocking for the west coast offense. It's simple, really; throwing deep requires giving enough time for receivers to run deep. If you limit the deep routes, the quarterback is not asked to hold the ball as long. You still have to run enough deep routes (and occasionally pass to them) to keep the defense honest, but the focus shifts more to the short-to-intermediate passing game. This is why so many zone-blocking teams adopt West-Coastish passing systems; the routes are based on timing and precision more than stretching the field. It doesn't have to be complex, but the routes must give the quarterback a chance to throw early if he is to throw at all.
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This is why we should sign Eric Winston. 9. Eric Winston, Kansas City Chiefs (RT) 10. Gosder Cherilus, Detroit Lions (RT) (UPDATE: Agreed to terms with the Indianapolis Colts) 11. Brandon Moore, New York Jets (G) 12. Willie Colon, Pittsburgh Steelers (UPDATE: Colon agreed to a contract with the New York Jets)(G) Notes: A zone-blocking specialist, Winston is already drawing interest from the Eagles and Dolphins on the heels of his recent release by the Chiefs. Don't rule out a reunion with the Texans, as right tackle was a trouble spot in 2012.
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Read this. One of the simplest reasons many teams have incorporated zone blocking in their offenses is that zone blocking rules do not change based on the defensive front. In a "man block" system, blockers are paired with defenders according to certain rules to create a running lane. If the defensive front changes, or if the defense stunts or blitzes, the blocking rules may change. This requires learning multiple rules for the same play. Zone blocking uses very consistent rules that do not change according to the defensive front
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I thought this might help you guys understand on why Jake Long is not ideal for our new offensive line scheme. Zone blocking is a technique in American football that is a simple and effective scheme for creating lanes for running plays. In a zone blocking scheme, fleet-footedness and athletic ability trump size as desirable qualities in offensive linemen. Coordination and technique matter more than muscle in implementing a successful scheme because defensive linemen are often double-teamed at the point of attack. In this blocking scheme which takes much from the Veer blocking system, creating movement on the defensive line is more important than opening a specific hole in the defense.
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Mar 18, 2013