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Socialnerdia
New Westminster, BC
Author of the book SOCIAL STATE. www.socialstatebook.com
Interests: Tech, marketing, social media, soccer, travel, family, friends, faith. Not in that order. www.estebancontreras.com
Recent Activity
Socialnerdia added a favorite at Logic+Emotion
Feb 25, 2013
Middle of the night rant alert... Marketers are opinionated and due to the nature of the job, most think they can do it better. I include myself and we all should if we work in fields that require creativity and corporate artistry. We could all be much better at appreciating others' work, not just because of who the other person is but because we have empathy and respect for one another. I know I've judged others and I've been judged for the small parts I've played in social media efforts. In that sense, yes, always sad to see such harsh treatment in a public forum. For Oscars night, I thought the conversation was honest and raw, and that's what social media is about. In my opinion, AOL did great and so did the pets company with the image about CATS. I appreciate what JCP did and I liked one of Oreo's images. Experimentation is good, and it should always be a part of the equation, and while I wasn't too impressed overall, it's cool to know that social is no longer just about the experimentation; it's part of doing business. But let's not forget: #OscarsRTM was about practitioners/agencies/industry people (and not even that many if we're honest). It was not a hashtag for consumers (although some probably stumbled upon it). While some people may be jerks about other brands' content, I'd consider it free feedback and something to learn from. I think it's good that you started the hashtag and I'm glad I participated in the conversation (since the Oscars were not very good on their own). In the end.... it's all about what a brand's audience thinks. I applaud anyone who works in the world of social because it is hard, it is painful and there's a whole lot of judgement coming from consumers, colleagues and industry folks. It's easier said than done. As long as customers/consumers are the focus (and not other marketers), social media teams and their agencies will be able to do a lot, regardless of how or when or where. Again, social media marketing + advertising + support + PR + etc... is and should be all about consumers. That's why Oreo gets the attention they get: They've been consistently focusing on creating consumer-centric content for years now. I'm glad they're getting attention. Is the approach replicable across all companies and industries? Probably not. Is it tiring to hear about same ol' Oreo? Sometimes. Did Oreo invent something? Absolutely not. Does it look like brands are jumping on a bandwagon without any real ideas? Maybe, but it doesn't matter unless their fans find it disingenuous. So... are brands like Oreo and Red Bull and Coca Cola and all the other brands that we keep hearing about keeping their fans engaged + buying their stuff better than competitors? Now that is the question marketers should be asking. Twitter trash talk can be forgiven as long as people are doing their jobs when it matters; it should just be considered part of the game because Twitter is about public disclosure of opinion. Maybe US Cellular should call the guy that poked fun at them and see what they can learn from him. Social media is public and it's all about "conversations" so they might as well take advantage of the feedback that maybe many others were simply thinking about. Who knows, maybe the guy that did it has no clue what he's talking about and it'd be a huge waste of time to get his input on anything. The more I think about it, social media teams are in need of a skillset that takes practice. As I said in one of my tweets, I wonder if social media teams should hire people that are truly good at spreading good ideas (creating memes, not just leveraging and jumping on existing ones). Maybe brands need to hire not just based on creative and writing talent, but on actual ability to envision and create highly shareable content. Social media teams need real-time thinkers and creators and collaborators. Maybe instead of looking at Klout, social media teams should be scouting on communities like Reddit and 4Chan ;)
Middle of the night rant alert... Marketers are opinionated and due to the nature of the job, most think they can do it better. I include myself and we all should if we work in fields that require creativity and corporate artistry. We could all be much better at appreciating others' work, not just because of who the other person is but because we have empathy and respect for one another. I know I've judged others and I've been judged for the small parts I've played in social media efforts. In that sense, yes, always sad to see such harsh treatment in a public forum. For Oscars night, I thought the conversation was honest and raw, and that's what social media is about. In my opinion, AOL did great and so did the pets company with the image about CATS. I appreciate what JCP did and I liked one of Oreo's images. Experimentation is good, and it should always be a part of the equation, and while I wasn't too impressed overall, it's cool to know that social is no longer just about the experimentation; it's part of doing business. But let's not forget: #OscarsRTM was about practitioners/agencies/industry people (and not even that many if we're honest). It was not a hashtag for consumers (although some probably stumbled upon it). While some people may be jerks about other brands' content, I'd consider it free feedback and something to learn from. I think it's good that you started the hashtag and I'm glad I participated in the conversation (since the Oscars were not very good on their own). In the end.... it's all about what a brand's audience thinks. I applaud anyone who works in the world of social because it is hard, it is painful and there's a whole lot of judgement coming from consumers, colleagues and industry folks. It's easier said than done. As long as customers/consumers are the focus (and not other marketers), social media teams and their agencies will be able to do a lot, regardless of how or when or where. Again, social media marketing + advertising + support + PR + etc... is and should be all about consumers. That's why Oreo gets the attention they get: They've been consistently focusing on creating consumer-centric content for years now. I'm glad they're getting attention. Is the approach replicable across all companies and industries? Probably not. Is it tiring to hear about same ol' Oreo? Sometimes. Did Oreo invent something? Absolutely not. Does it look like brands are jumping on a bandwagon without any real ideas? Maybe, but it doesn't matter unless their fans find it disingenuous. So... are brands like Oreo and Red Bull and Coca Cola and all the other brands that we keep hearing about keeping their fans engaged + buying their stuff better than competitors? Now that is the question marketers should be asking. Twitter trash talk can be forgiven as long as people are doing their jobs when it matters; it should just be considered part of the game because Twitter is about public disclosure of opinion. Maybe US Cellular should call the guy that poked fun at them and see what they can learn from him. Social media is public and it's all about "conversations" so they might as well take advantage of the feedback that maybe many others were simply thinking about. Who knows, maybe the guy that did it has no clue what he's talking about and it'd be a huge waste of time to get his input on anything. The more I think about it, social media teams are in need of a skillset that takes practice. As I said in one of my tweets, I wonder if social media teams should hire people that are truly good at spreading good ideas (creating memes, not just leveraging and jumping on existing ones). Maybe brands need to hire not just based on creative and writing talent, but on actual ability to envision and create highly shareable content. Social media teams need real-time thinkers and creators and collaborators. Maybe instead of looking at Klout, social media teams should be scouting on communities like Reddit and 4Chan ;)
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Dec 31, 2009