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Steve Keefe
The leader of Lake Arrowheads Number One Real Estate Team.
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Mar 15, 2010
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Representatives for Stone Brewing Co. will be in Lake Arrowhead at Vino 100 on Saturday February 27, 2010 from Noon to 5pm to show off some spectacular beers. We will discuss everybody's plans for hooking up on Saturday at Friday Nights meeting. Continue reading
Posted Feb 20, 2010 at Mountain Brew Club
February 1, 2010 – Jim Grant As the first meeting of the Mountain Brew Club convened, it quickly became clear that this was going to be a great group! Even with three enthusiastic members unable to attend, there were still around a dozen in attendance. Ryan Gil de Montes from Inland Empire Brewing Company (Riverside, CA) made the drive up the mountain and brought two of their recent brews for us to taste. Over the course of the evening he shared with the group some history of their company, some successes, hopes for the future, and some great stories about... Continue reading
Posted Feb 2, 2010 at Mountain Brew Club
This months meeting will be held tomorrow evening at the home of Steve and Jamie Keefe at 26613 Hillcrest in Lake Arrowhead at 7pm. We will be studying Brown Ales and Stouts. Please be sure to bring enough for 10-12 people to taste. Obviously, we prefer homebrew, but if you dont have any to bring, bring your favorite commercial version. In addition to the beer, bring some type of snack that goes good with beer that will feed 10 people. Looking forward to seeing you all... if you wouldn't mind confirm with Steve at steve@cbskyridge.com if you are coming and... Continue reading
Posted Jan 28, 2010 at Mountain Brew Club
Unfortunately due to inclement weather, the January 22 meeting of the Mountain Brew Club has been postponed due to weather. The new meeting will be scheduled for Friday January 29th at 7pm at Steve and Jamie Keefe's house. Please confirm via email to steve@cbskyridge.com if you will be attending the meeting so he can give you the details. Sorry for the inconvenience, but we don't control the weather. Continue reading
Posted Jan 20, 2010 at Mountain Brew Club
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Saturday January 9, 2010, Jim Grant was hard at work bottling his first batch of beer: When I arrived, Jim had everything set up nicely. Looks Like it is ready! Me (Steve Keefe) and Bob Parkinson preparing to rack the beer.... Bottling and Capping... Nothing left but the drinking.... Nice Job Jim... Can't wait to taste it! Continue reading
Posted Jan 13, 2010 at Mountain Brew Club
“Whoa! This beer is skunked!” is probably something you've heard before, uttered by someone who was probably drinking a green-bottled Heineken. And from the guy who thinks he knows something about beer: “That's because it's in a green bottle, dude.” Not quite, junior beer guru. That so-called “skunked” character has nothing to do with green bottles, or any color bottles. True, some beer bottle colors are more susceptible to being what's called “light-struck,” however, the whole idea that the color is the cause is completely wrong. What does light-struck mean? This is when the beer has been exposed to ultraviolet... Continue reading
Posted Jan 11, 2010 at Mountain Brew Club
The origins of Bock beer are quite uncharted. Back in medieval days German monasteries would brew a strong beer for sustenance during their Lenten fasts. Some believe the name Bock came from the shortening of Einbeck thus "beck" to "bock." Others believe it is more of a pagan or old world influence that the beer was only to be brewed during the sign of the Capricorn goat and that "bock" means goat in German. Illustrations of the goats related with Bock beer would produce some of the most whimsical and lively beer art ever fashioned. In Europe pictures of Knights... Continue reading
Posted Jan 11, 2010 at Mountain Brew Club
1. Malted barley is soaked in hot water to create fermentable sugars. 2. The malt sugar solution is boiled with hops for seasoning. 3. The solution is cooled and yeast is addede to begin fermentation. 4. The yeast ferments the sugars, releasing carbon dioxide and ethyl alcohol. 5. When the main fermentation is complete, the beer is bottled with a little bit of added sugar to provide the carbonation. 6. The beer is enjoyed... Continue reading
Posted Jan 9, 2010 at Mountain Brew Club
Recently I heard a story about a guy who had a couple of bags of hops he threw out in his garden to let cool after he had finished his brew. He had noticed that his dog had eaten one of the bags of hops. In a panic, he called his vet who said it should be ok. He then called the local brew supply store who confirmed what the vet said. Later that day he logged on to one of the bulletin boards and started asking some questions where one of the guys said... "get your dog to the... Continue reading
Posted Jan 8, 2010 at Mountain Brew Club
Hell yes, beer is food! In fact, it should be considered one of the major food groups. Here are some reasons why: Yes beer is a beverage, as the majority of its composition is water; however, given that it's also made with cereal grains, hops and yeast, all of this combined goodness is oftentimes a meal in itself. Ever have a rich, luscious beer that just about fills you up on its own? Tha is what I am talkin' about. Monasteries and beer have a long history, and to this day many orders of monks still brew their own beer... Continue reading
Posted Jan 7, 2010 at Mountain Brew Club
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Saturday January 2, 2009 Bob Parkinson and I went down to Beer, Beer and More Beer in Riverside for their bi-monthly brew day. The first Saturday of every month, they brew an extract batch and the third Saturday they do an all grain brew. We arrived around 10am and Erik Zwack was getting set up to brew a 10 gallon extract batch of IPA of the Gods. Erik split the batch into two 6 gallon carboys and used a different yeast with each 5 gallons to see which yeast works out best. I took some shots to document the process.... Continue reading
Posted Jan 4, 2010 at Mountain Brew Club
Many people have asked me why homebrew has such a gaseous effect on some folks. I did some research. Part of my research I uncovered the following thread which I am reprinting from www.tastybrew.com Beer Farts Prevention by Jason My SWMBO is generally very supported of my brewing and subsequent consumption however she does not appreciate the after effects...the HomeBrew fart. She tells me that she refuses to go to the bathroom at night becuase she fears the return trip (fresh air-> contaminated air). I dont really have gas problmes with commercial beers or any foods but man when I... Continue reading
Posted Jan 2, 2010 at Mountain Brew Club
Yeast are single-celled microorganisms that reproduce by budding. They are biologically classified as fungi and are responsible for converting fermentable sugars into alcohol and other byproducts. There are literally hundreds of varieties and strains of yeast. In the past, there were two types of beer yeast: ale yeast (the "top-fermenting" type, Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and lager yeast (the "bottom-fermenting" type, Saccharomyces uvarum, formerly known as Saccharomyces carlsbergensis). Today, as a result of recent reclassification of Saccharomyces species, both ale and lager yeast strains are considered to be members of S. cerevisiae. Top-Fermenting Yeast Ale yeast strains are best used at temperatures... Continue reading
Posted Dec 31, 2009 at Mountain Brew Club
Beer is a wonderful social lubricant, and what better way to apply it than hosting your own beer tasting party! Not only are they fun, but they can be very educational and enlightening – as the world of beer often is. Step One: What Beer To Buy? First, who will be attending? If they are potential converts to the world of better beer, then cross them over with lighter styles, like lagers/pilsners, golden/blonde ales and perhaps finish things off with a light pale ale or even a dry Irish stout – aka "crossover" beers. Steer clear of over-the-top hoppy and... Continue reading
Posted Dec 31, 2009 at Mountain Brew Club
Most Americans look at Stout as a thick, murky, "eat it with a spoon" beer. It is also a common misconception that these black beers are more potent, simply due to their appearance. Plenty of beer lovers see it as a nitro forced black beverage and happily quaff down several pints a night with out a second thought, usually a Guinness Draught or Murphy's. Guinness has less alcohol than Budweiser, around 4.2% alcohol by volume (on tap, 4.1% draught can, in the US) which would explain why everyone can drink so much of it, so quickly, and why it has... Continue reading
Posted Dec 30, 2009 at Mountain Brew Club
No other type of beer arouses more questions about its origin. Is Porter Irish or English? What does the name mean? Porter is said to have been popular with transportation workers of Central London. Most traditional English brewing documentation from the 1700's state that Porter was a blend of three different styles: An Old Ale (spoiled or soured), a New Ale (Brown or Pale Ale), and a weak one (Mild Ale) with various combinations of blending and staleness. The end result was also commonly known as "Entire Butt" or "Three Threads" and had a pleasing taste of neither new or... Continue reading
Posted Dec 30, 2009 at Mountain Brew Club
The words "mild" and "brown" are two of the oldest terms used to describe English beers, and they are still in use today. Not surprisingly, these terms can be the source of some confusion from a historical perspective. Fortunately, current commercial practice provides fairly clear definitions of these two styles for brewers and drinkers. More about the styles later... lets talk about some history. The earliest of English beers were believed to be brown in color. The beverage of Robin Hood and Mary Queen of Scots would have been made from a malt that was brown and smokey as a... Continue reading
Posted Dec 30, 2009 at Mountain Brew Club
Barleywine the sweet elixer worthy of a beer god. Lively and fruity, sometimes sweet, sometimes bittersweet but always alcoholic. A brew of this strength (usually 8-13% ABV) and complexity can be a challenge even for the most experienced beer fan. Young Barleywines can be rough to the tastebuds with the 3-4 times the amount of hops in other brews. Imagine freezing cold weather that chills you to the bone, nearing the point of torture, what do we turn to... barleywine. Looking for a pairing for some Belgian chocolate, or aged cheddar, barleywine is it. These beers can be aged and... Continue reading
Posted Dec 30, 2009 at Mountain Brew Club
Americans are obsessed with supersizing their lives, from buying hummer trucks to make up for lack of male confidence, to the etra fries and jumbo coke illusion of value, to 55-packs of molson to ensure optimal black out possibilities at tail gate parties. Ironically, with fast food nation under fire and low carb diets sweeping the masses, many mega beer manufacturers are trying to sell consumers on the opposite, by brewing watery, fizzy, bland beers that suggest weight loss, in an attempt to appeal to mass laziness that has plagued our nation. Less is better? Not where beer is concerned.... Continue reading
Posted Dec 30, 2009 at Mountain Brew Club
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Club Founder Steve Keefe has got a lot of brewing experience in a very short period of time. A real estate broker by trade, Steve owns Coldwell Banker Sky Ridge Realty the largest and most successful real estate firm in the San Bernardino mountains of Southern California. Steve began homebrewing in May of 2009 and as of this writing has over 30 5 gallon batches in a 7 month time period. He has experimented with many different styles of beer, but likes most to brew Stouts, IPA's and Alt's. In December 2009 Steve and several buddies decided to start a... Continue reading
Posted Dec 30, 2009 at Mountain Brew Club
Pale Ales are classified as either English or American. The two styles are brewed to similar specifications, but the American Pale Ale has definetly set itself apart from many of the traditional and standard flavors often found in English Pale Ales. Most English Pale Ales run a medium to high hop bitterness, low to medium malt presence, some caramel, buttery and fruity flavors perhaps and no higher than 5.5% abv. American Pale Ales generally impart a higher than normal hop bitterness, flavor and aroma. Often hops can be on the coarse side even in the aroma due to the use... Continue reading
Posted Dec 30, 2009 at Mountain Brew Club
Dusseldorf Altbier- A well balanced, bitter yet malty, clean, smooth, well-attenuated, copper-colored German ale. The flavor and aroma are both full of dark bread, and often spicy or floral hop notes. The hop bitterness ranges from moderate to quite high, leaving it balanced nearly evenly in some examples and firmly bittered in others. Often when we thing of German beer, we think of "Lager" what most don't know is that long before lagers the Germans brewed Ales. Ales have been brewed in Germany for over 3000 years. Not many styles of beer can be traced back over 3000 years, however... Continue reading
Posted Dec 30, 2009 at Mountain Brew Club
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Just returned from the home of Bob and Debra Parkinson where I did Brew School II. We brewed Bob's first batch of beer a Brown Ale. Debra surprised Bob at Christmas with a B3 brew kit what a gal! Thank you both for a great evening... It was a lot of fun and Bob I can't wait to taste the Brown. Below is a picture of Bob with his new Baby... Continue reading
Posted Dec 29, 2009 at Mountain Brew Club
The inaugural meeting of the Mountain Home Brew Club is scheduled for Friday January 22, 2010 at the home of Steve and Jamie Keefe. The address is 26613 Hillcrest Dr. Lake Arrowhead, CA The flavor of the month will be English Brown Ale (for more info on Brown Ales Click Here) , Porter (for more info on Porters Click Here) and Stout (for more info on Stouts Click Here) . If you have a batch made, or a favorite commercial brand, bring some for you and to share so we can compare notes. Hamburgers and Hot Dogs with all the... Continue reading
Posted Dec 29, 2009 at Mountain Brew Club