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somewhere in space
Hearts of Space radio and online music service producer
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In 35 years of Hearts of Space, there've only been a handful of occasions when we devoted an entire program to a single album or composition. This week we do it with a superb collaboration between Iranian singer MAHSA VAHDAT and Norway's 50 voice SKRUK CHOIR, under the direction of PER ODDVAR HILDRE, with music and arrangements by the great Norwegian pianist TORD GUSTAVSEN from the album I VINENS SPEIL—In the Mirror of Wine. It's a journey across time, space, and culture, a moving encounter between traditional Persian songs, Norwegian church music, and jazz. A program called EAST MEETS NORTH, on this transmission of Hearts of Space. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted 2 days ago at hearts of space | news
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From the prehistoric days of musical instruments, we have the flute, the rattle, and the drum; later, primitive trumpets and reeds; and from ancient Mesopotamia more than 4,000 years ago, early members of the chordophone family of plucked strings — lyres, zithers, harps, and lutes. Stringed instruments have come a long way since then. In Europe, bowed strings were refined into the violin family we know today, while lutes evolved into the guitar. Music for strings developed along with the instruments, and Western classical music is rich with variations. Among stringed instruments, perhaps the most versatile is the cello: a virtual solo string orchestra. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, contemplative music for strings with a focus on the cello, on a program called TIMELESS STRINGS. Featured cellists are JAMIE SIEBER, DAVID DARLING, JONATHAN HUGH, and MARTIN TILLMAN. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Oct 5, 2018 at hearts of space | news
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Descending into the autumn soundscape, we return to the slower, darker, burnished electro-acoustic sounds of the season: cello, piano, electronic keyboards. It's a time for descending progressions, dark drones and minor key harmonies, as the music echoes the shorter days and declining light after the fall equinox. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, an ambient journey for early autumn, on a program called FALLING DARK 4. Music is by TIM STORY & HANS-JOACHIM ROEDELIUS, JEFF GREINKE, HAROLD BUDD, HERION, JEFF PEARCE, RICHARD BONE, and from Finland, JANNE HANHISUANTO. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Sep 28, 2018 at hearts of space | news
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One of the core experiences of ambient and electronic spacemusic is the feeling of weightless floating. These subtle sounds seem to dematerialize us, expand our personal space, and slow our sense of time. It's kind of magical — and for many of us, highly pleasurable, even addictive. Since the introduction of mass-produced electronic instruments in the 1970s, anyone can create floating textures, but even if you're just a listener, the experience is widely enjoyed and often described in therapeutic terms as relaxing, healing, and transformative. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, another anti-gravity journey on electronic waves, on a program called FLOATING WORLDS 2. Music is by PAUL AVGERINOS, ERIK WØLLO, HOWARD GIVENS & CRAIG PADILLA, PHILLIP WILKERSON, and MAX CORBACHO. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Sep 22, 2018 at hearts of space | news
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What's in a groove? In music the term usually describes a repeating rhythm pattern that creates a cycle of movement and a sense of propulsion. The word has been used in jazz since the 1930's, but grooves have been key to dance music around the world for centuries, and are an element of many popular genres. Swiss musician DON LI has taken the concept farther, working with what he calls "curved rhythms" and subtle changes in phrasing that create changing perceptions of time and space. His work is often described as "reductive" or "minimal." On this transmission of Hearts of Space, we explore minimal rhythms and ambient patterns, on a program called MINIMAL GROOVE. Music by DON LI, TWILIGHT ARCHIVE, ALEX HAAS & BILL LASWELL, NELSON FOLTZ & TOM LYNN, SATORI, and MIDORI TAKADA. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Sep 15, 2018 at hearts of space | news
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IRV TEIBEL was an innovator and entrepreneur who created the ENVIRONMENTS series of ambient sound recordings in the 1970s. He perfected the concept of functional therapeutic background sound, once comparing his recordings to "a bar of soap." Teibel realized that nature sounds had a soothing, calming, restorative quality, so he concentrated on ocean waves, flowing streams, birds, insects, wind and rain. Listening to nature sounds takes us back to pre-industrial, pre-electronic media times, where we spent hours every day immersed in natural sound environments. In fact, it's fair to say that our stereoscopic hearing system itself evolved to guide, position, and protect us in the natural environment. With characteristic bravado, Teibel called his one-man record label SYNTONIC RESEARCH. His obsessive persistence, technical talent, genius for branding and marketing, and over-the-top, buzzword-filled copywriting led to the first commercially successful series of ambient sound recordings. The debut release in 1969 was an ocean recording, which he branded "The Psychologically Ultimate Seashore." Against all odds, it was a hit—picked up by a major label and sold millions, which gave him the freedom to expand his idea into a series. Teibel wasn't a purist; when he couldn't get a real ocean recording that fit his concept, he turned to a scientist friend at Bell Labs and created it electronically on an early IBM mainframe. Until recently, his work was an almost forgotten artifact of the 1970s. But according to a profile by CARA GIAIMO at atlasobscura.com, Teibel was the transition between the 1960s era of Muzak, "mood music" and cheesy sound effects records, and the 1980s era of New Age atmospherics, Ambient music and Brian Eno. And, not coincidentally, Hearts of Space. The original ENVIRONMENTS LPs and later CDs were out of print for years, but recently they appeared on the full-catalog streaming services... Continue reading
Posted Sep 8, 2018 at hearts of space | news
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GLIDING IN in on sleek electronic waves, marking time with a subtle four-note sequence, drifting across ethereal atmospheres, and riding off on the solar wind. Yes, spacefans, we've arrived at that timely combination of chilled electronics and the season we call... SUMMERTRONICA. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, ambient electronics to cool your summer, on a program called SUMMERTRONICA 7. Music is by ASCENDANT, ROBERT RICH, BLUETECH, LEMONGRASS, and STEVE BRAND. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Aug 31, 2018 at hearts of space | news
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The Zulu harmonies of LADYSMITH BLACK MAMBAZO from South Africa have a special place in the history of contemporary music. Established in the 1960s, their fame in their homeland attracted the attention of American pop singer/songwriter PAUL SIMON, who went to South Africa to record with them in 1986. The resulting album GRACELAND sold 16 million copies, and arguably kicked off the 'world music' trend in the United States. Of course, there's a lot more to African music. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, we immerse ourselves in the buoyant rhythms, earthy sounds and charming melodies that make African music such a delight, with songs by LADYSMITH BLACK MOMBAZO, HABIB KOITE & BAMADA, WILL RIDENOUR & BETSY BEVAN, SAMITE, KEVIN NATHANIEL, DAVID GILDEN, AYUB OGADA, and DANIEL BERKMAN. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Aug 24, 2018 at hearts of space | news
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After two centuries of novels and a century of films, the endless desert spaces of the American southwest have taken on a mythic identity. The desert has become a metaphor for expansion, infinite opportunity, and the wild frontier — the scene of rough justice and adventure, and a place for self-discovery and reinvention. For Ambient musicians, the desert has long been a prime source of inspiration, a visual and spatial touchstone, a realm of vast vistas and profound silences. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, another journey in the sun-dried spaces of the American Southwest, on a program called DESERT REFLECTIONS. Music is by STEVE ROACH, DAN POUND, D LOOP, BRIAN PARNHAM, and RUDY ADRIAN. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Aug 17, 2018 at hearts of space | news
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Only a few places can claim a native music with worldwide popularity, but the province of Andalusia in southern Spain is one. With roots going back to medieval times, in the late 18th century a rare fusion of Moorish, Christian, Sephardic Jewish and Gypsy cultures gave birth to the fiery rhythms and dark harmonies of flamenco. This is the culture that gave us the Spanish guitar — a descendant of the Arabic lute called the oud. For sheer cultural impact, it's a record that's hard to beat. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, contemporary Spanish fusions and the soulful music of Andalusia, on a program called IN A SPANISH MOOD. Music is by B-TRIBE, JOHANNES LINSTEAD, BOB ZOPP, JEFF DWARSHUIS, GINO D'AURI, the AL-ANDALUS ENSEMBLE, ADAM HURST, ANDRE FERIANTE, MILOŠ, and BENEDETTI & SVOBODA. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Aug 11, 2018 at hearts of space | news
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One of the most successful innovations of the early days of popular electronic music was the "sequencer" — an easy way to make repeating electronic patterns. Beginning in the 1940s as a crude electro-mechanical device, it was refined in the 1960s by DON BUCHLA as part of his modular analog synthesizer. The sequencer was so musically useful that it was quickly adopted by ROBERT MOOG and soon became a standard feature of analog synthesizers. Moog's legendary instruments were snapped up in the 1970s by cutting edge European musicians. In Berlin the artist behind (the music you're hearing), a young drummer named KLAUS SCHULZE, was a founding member of several early electronic bands before going solo. The rest is electronic music history. The hypnotic rhythms that Klaus Schulze, Tangerine Dream and others created with their sequencers were so influential that the "Berlin School" style lives on today and enjoys periodic revivals. It's addictive, enjoyable music: for some, a descendant of Baroque counterpoint; for others, an infinite playground of music for virtual flight across electronic soundscapes; and for listeners, an appealing rhythmic music...without drums. On this transmission of Hearts of Space...flying and floating on electronic rhythms, on a program called SUMMERFLIGHT. Music is by KLAUS SCHULZE, ASCENDANT, DITHMAR, CHRONOTOPE PROJECT, NATURAL FREQUENCIES, PETE NAMLOOK & DR. ATMO, ISHQ, and ALPHA WAVE MOVEMENT. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Aug 4, 2018 at hearts of space | news
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The history of Jamaican Dub music is rich and fascinating. Dub grew out of reggae in the 1960s, and evolved well beyond its popular parent. It was a studio craft where producers created instrumental remixes of reggae tracks by removing the vocals, adding echo, reverb and delay, and dubbing in new ambient sounds. Essentially, dub was an early form of popular electronic music. If you think all this had something to do with cannabis, you'd be understating the case. In a 1982 essay, LUKE EHRLICH said: "With dub, Jamaican music spaced out completely. If reggae is Africa in the New World, then dub must be Africa on the moon; it's the psychedelic music I expected to hear in the 1960s...and didn't. The bass and drums conjure up a dark, vast musical portrait of outer space, with sounds suspended like glowing planets or the fragments of instruments careening by, leaving trails like comets and meteors." Dub was a natural link to later electronic genres like techno, ambient, trip hop and electronic dance music. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, the trancey beats of Jamaican Dub and its electronic descendants, on a program from guest producer DAVID J. EGAN called DEEP DUB. Music is by JAH WOBBLE & MARCONI UNION, ORKUS, FINGERS IN THE NOISE, ECHO GRID, PURL & DEFLEKTION, LOSCIL, and MOTIONFIELD. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jul 28, 2018 at hearts of space | news
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Believe it or not, the combination of ambient nature sounds and electronic music was actually an innovation in the 1970s. And you may be surprised that the idea had a history in European classical music, especially in England and France. In England, it was the so-called "pastoral" composers like ARNOLD BAX and RALPH VAUGHAN WILLIAMS, who created orchestral images of nature. In France, it was the Impressionists, from CLAUDE DEBUSSY to OLIVIER MESSIAEN. They didn't have recordings, so they created new instruments and playing techniques to imitate natural sounds like wind and birdsongs. By the mid-20th century, we could record the sounds of nature, edit them and play them back at will. In the 1950s, avant-garde composers like JOHN CAGE were promoting an awareness of ambient sound as equal to music. Music...was how you listened. Incorporating nature sounds into music was the next step; beside, film soundtracks had been doing it for years. The psychology is foundational: humans evolved listening to natural sounds, and they send a message we respond to instinctively. For example, birdsong on a gentle summer morning is delightful and calming. Blend in some subtle synthesizers, season with gourmet reverberation and you have what two young Canadians named MYCHAEL DANNA and TIM CLÉMENT called "environmental electronic music." It's an idea that was embraced by New Age musicians and in time became a bit of a cliché. But it led to an electronic genre of extended tone-color journeys in virtual space, which is still alive and well. On this transmission of Hearts of Space...the fluid, airy sound of summer spacemusic, on a program called SUMMERTONES 3. Music is by MEG BOWLES, DANNA & CLÉMENT, CHRONOTOPE PROJECT, ALTUS, and STELLIA. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jul 20, 2018 at hearts of space | news
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Over the last 35 years we've broadcast some 31 programs inspired by the evocative, intensely moving music of North Africa and the Middle East. And almost every time, I've added a disclaimer that these programs have nothing to do with the contentious politics of the region. After all, these are some of the oldest cultures on earth, with complex, artistically evolved musical traditions. But in one sense, politics has made a difference. The political ferment has led to a diaspora of hundreds of the region's best musicians, who now live and work in France, Germany, Great Britain, the Netherlands, Canada, and the U.S. From the relative safety and stability of western cities, nostalgia for their homelands has produced what poet HAKIM BEY memorably called "romantic transcultural exile music of the Middle East." These creative fusions of Arabic, North African, Persian and electronic music stand as living examples of cultural tolerance and communication. I'm Stephen Hill and on this transmission of Hearts of Space, we return to the superheated spaces of the Middle East and North Africa, on a program called DESERT SOUL 2. Music is by MICHEL BANABILA & MEHMET POLAT, RHO UTASATO, YUVAL RON ENSEMBLE, MAHSA VAHDAT, PETE NAMLOOK & BURHAN OÇAL, ALEX KHASKIN, DHAFER YOUSSEF, ANOUAR BRAHEM, MERCAN DEDE, and OMAR FARUK TEKBILEK. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jul 13, 2018 at hearts of space | news
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Of all the psycho-physical sensations produced by ambient music, perhaps the most widely enjoyed is the feeling of weightless floating. Of course, there are other ways to achieve this sought-after state: scuba diving, for example, is an exercise in "neutral buoyancy," where the diver floats suspended in the water column, weightless and serene. And scientist JOHN LILLY and others famously promoted "floatation tanks" filled with body-temperature salt water for floating psychonauts. At the extreme sports end of the weightlessness experience, we have roller coasters, tethered drops like bungee jumping, high pressure air columns, and diving planes with padded interiors. But let's face it spacefans — music is safer and more accessible than all the others. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, we take an anti-gravity journey in the ambient soundscape called FLOATING WAVES. Music is by THOUGHT GUILD, CARL SAGAN's GHOST, JONN SERRIE, COYOTE OLDMAN, STU JENKS, and CONSTANCE DEMBY. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jul 6, 2018 at hearts of space | news
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It's not all that often that a new strain of popular electronic music arrives in the culture fully formed, but it happened in 1988 in the wake of STEVE ROACH's ground-breaking album DREAMTIME RETURN. Like Stravinsky 75 years earlier with The Rite of Spring, Roach realized that electronic music needed a dose of primitive energy and physicality — and he found it in the trance-inducing music of the aboriginal tribes of Australia. The new genre was called "Techno-Tribal" and it combined electronic atmospheres with primitive rattles, drums, rocks, and the aboriginal didgeridoo. If our current political tribalism is an index of popularity, tribal music should be all the rage. But most electronic artists are urban, and have been influenced by Electronic Dance Music. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, electronic atmospheres meet trance percussion, on a program called TRIBAL AMBIENT. Music is by STEVE ROACH, BYRON METCALF & JENNIFER GRAIS, INLAKESH, FRORE & SHANE MORRIS, JOHN VORUS, D LOOP and KEVIN BRAHENY [FORTUNE]. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jun 30, 2018 at hearts of space | news
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Since the earliest days of popular electronic music, artists have created sonic images of cosmic space. Where traditional instruments failed, synthesizers seemed right at home in the endless vacuum of the interstellar void. Exploring this vast environment led to a kind of traveling music of slowly changing rhythmic loops — originally made on hardware "sequencers," later on dedicated "loopers," and now with software. Invented in Berlin in the 1970s by German artists like KLAUS SCHULZE and TANGERINE DREAM, the "Berlin school" style was widely influential and still has descendants today. Extending the metaphor of cosmic travel...once you arrived at your destination, it was time to power down the propulsive rhythms and experience the awesome cosmic panorama. This led to a slower, quieter, beatless electronic music for floating in space — static and contemplative, the progenitor of Chill. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, electronic meditations on space and motion, on a program called COSMIC TRAVELER 2. Music is by STEVE ROACH, BROEKHUIS KELLER & SCHÖNWÄLDER, MICHAEL BRÜCKNER, JACK HERTZ, RICHARD BONE, CHRISTOPHER WILLITS & RYUICHI SAKAMOTO, and SVERRE KNUT JOHANSEN. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jun 22, 2018 at hearts of space | news
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Slow and gentle, the harmonic drone and the ancient bansuri flute invite us to another journey in the contemplative music of India. Half a world and centuries away from European practice, Indian classical music developed in its own unique way. It focused on melody and rhythm rather than harmony, evolved a sophisticated framework for improvisation in live performance called raga, and a set of rhythm rules called tala. The goal of raga is to create mood, atmosphere and feeling for the listener. And though Indian music once sounded impossibly strange and exotic to European ears, as a result of the tireless touring of Indian virtuosi like RAVI SHANKAR and ALI AKBAR KHAN, it was embraced in the 20th century by Western avant garde and experimental musicians, and later by others exploring the new frontiers of electronic music. Building on the sounds, instruments and strategies of Indian raga, they created new hybrids of Eastern and Western music which are still being explored today. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, a journey in the creative world of Indian fusion, on a program called BEYOND THE RAGASPHERE. Music is by JOHN WUBBENHORST, AL GROMER KHAN, ALAM KHAN, MARK DEUTSCH, HANS CHRISTIAN, CRAIG PRUESS & ANURADHA PAUDWAL, and ALIO DIE. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jun 16, 2018 at hearts of space | news
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The trance rhythms of the Middle East, Asia and Africa are steady, continuous, and slowly changing. Rather than driving you forward like the ubiquitous military march beats of western rock, they patiently insinuate themselves on your nervous system, steady the breath, slow the pulse, and ultimately...transform your awareness. Psychologists call it "entrainment" or "dissociation." The rest of us call it enchantment, rapture, ecstasy, or euphoria. It's all part of the wide world of trance. Trance rhythms have been used by priests and shamans in non-western cultures for centuries. More recently they've been rediscovered by western musicians seeking an alternative to conventional beats, used by so-called "minimalist" classical composers, and adopted by experimental musicians around the world for their psychoactive power and popular appeal. Trance is also a major genre of Electronic Dance Music, with mind-altering beats heard on dance floors around the world. On this transmission of Hearts of Space...we're going to insinuate ourselves on your nervous system — in a good way — with soft summer trance music, on a program called INNER RHYTHMS. Music is by JAMES HOOD, BYRON METCALF, LOREN NERELL, DREAM JUNGLE, and DON LI. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jun 8, 2018 at hearts of space | news
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In the fair days of late spring, electronic winds blow warm and steady, while sequencers spin creative rhythms, propelling us into the active days and balmy nights of summer. DJs prepare their sets for the summer festivals, while ambient composers create expansive soundscapes for virtual travel. Attention Spacefans: it's party time. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, an hour of technotronic rhythms and ambient atmospheres, on a program called HYPERTRONIC. Music is by S1GNS OF L1FE, MARC HARTMAN, MEES DIERDORP, MARTIN NONSTATIC, ASC, CRYSTAL MOON, LEMONGRASS, ISHQ, and ALPHA WAVE MOVEMENT. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Jun 2, 2018 at hearts of space | news
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Back in 1975, a Northern California steel string guitarist named WILL ACKERMAN began playing and selling cassettes of his music around the Stanford University campus. It was so popular it led to the founding of Windham Hill Records in 1976 — the first big success of the music trend that came to be called New Age Music in the 1980s. Instrumental, acoustic, and generally low key, Windham Hill literally became the poster child for a grab-bag genre that became ever more unfocussed as it grew—a category for anything that wasn't jazz or folk, rock or pop. But it served a need for quiet, relaxing, meditative instrumental music that continues today. In time the New Age Music category became so diverse as to be almost meaningless. Home studios, inexpensive publishing on cassette and later CD, meant that anyone could release their music, and the genre's reputation deteriorated to the point that serious producers of atmospheric music called theirs Ambient, Electronic, or just about anything else. Yet — in the last few years, the New Age genre has seen a critical reconsideration, with carefully curated compilations of historical material, while both veterans and descendants of the genre are creating new music that merits serious attention. A good example is the group FLOW, which includes none other than steel string guitarist WILL ACKERMAN, in a kind of New Age "supergroup." On this transmission of Hearts of Space, we ride the vernal breezes into the gentle sound of the season, on a program called FLOWING INTO SPRING 4. Music is by FLOW, PETER KATER, JIM GABRIEL, MICHAEL WHALEN, MIACHAEL BRANT DeMARIA, CHRIS HAUGEN, TOM MOORE & SHERRY FINZER, and MAJESTICA. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted May 25, 2018 at hearts of space | news
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What's the biggest thing on earth? It's the World Ocean — the total salt water of all the named oceans: Pacific, Atlantic, Indian, Southern, Arctic. The world ocean is the largest part of the hydrosphere— the system of water, atmosphere and time that gives rise to the water cycle, weather and climate. Over 70% of earth is covered by the oceans, with an average depth of over 12,000 feet. That...is a lot of water. So though we're not an all-ocean planet, we're definitely a water planet. Everything about the ocean is almost incomprehensibly vast, deep and powerful. Little wonder then, that it's a major inspiration, theme and metaphor for Ambient musicians. On this transmission of Hearts of Space...we journey across oceans of electronic sound, on a program called OCEANIC REALMS. Music is by MEG BOWLES, MOODSWINGS, DAN POUND, MAX CORBACHO, STEVE ROACH, IGNEOUS FLAME, and PATRICK O'HEARN. [ view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted May 18, 2018 at hearts of space | news
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CONFESSION...it's simple in theory: to tell the truth. In practice? It's more complicated. Confession plays a critical role in the justice system, in religion, in therapeutic and personal relationships. And at a time when the very idea of objective facts and truth is being challenged, confession is more important than ever. A true confession is a revelation — a release of hidden knowledge. And it's often accompanied by powerful, even cathartic, emotions. No wonder confessional songs and music are found in some of the oldest cultures on earth. On this transmission of Hearts of Space...the quiet sound of emotional truth, on a program called CONFESSIONS. Music is by ADAM HURST, ELINA DUNI, MIRABAI CEIBA, SAVINA YANNATOU, BADI ASSAD, JOSÉ LUIS MONTÓN, ESTÁS TONNÉ, ANDRÉ GERAISSATI, and AMBERFERN. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted May 11, 2018 at hearts of space | news
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One of the most seductive musical combinations is the soft cry of a wind instrument — in this case, a soprano saxophone — floating high and free above a cushion of electronic sound. It's a combination that brings out the best of its parts: the melodic, emotional expression of the horn; the spacious sonic architecture of an ambient electronic soundfield. Winds with electronics are relatively new, but the sound of a primitive flute or horn resonating in acoustic space goes back to the cave homes of our earliest ancestors. It's a formative sound experience in the evolution of the ambient sensibility, revived in the 1960s by clarinetist TONY SCOTT in MUSIC FOR ZEN MEDITATION, and by flutist PAUL HORN in his classic recording INSIDE THE TAJ MAHAL. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, we explore the happy combination of acoustic winds and ambient electronics, on a program called FLOATING WINDS. Music is by KEVIN BRAHENY FORTUNE, MATT BORGHI & MICHAEL TEAGER, KLAUS SCHULZE (with TOBIAS BECKER), and KIT WATKINS. [ view program page ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted May 5, 2018 at hearts of space | news
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SPRING: it arrives in the Northern Hemisphere in fits and starts. It takes several months before we're all on the spring page. In the meantime, we can take a hint from our pagan ancestors, who went in for big parties around the vernal equinox to let the gods know they were ready for spring. In those days, drummers got everyone moving around the communal bonfires. These days, hand drummers tap out mesmerizing rhythms on new melodic percussion instruments like the PanArt Hang and the Halo handpans. On this transmission of Hearts of Space...we follow the sound of the Hang, on an ethno-tronic journey for spring called TRANCE PLANET 2. Music is by JAMES HOOD, HANG IN BALANCE, HANG MASSIVE, LAURA INSERRA & DARREN GIBBS, CHRISTOPHER OF THE WOLVES, and PETER GARLAND. view playlist ] [ view Flickr image gallery ] [ play 30 second MP3 promo ] Continue reading
Posted Apr 27, 2018 at hearts of space | news