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Cactus Wren
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Can I reuse the salt? Perhaps pour it into a container and freeze it for the next slab of salmon?
Toggle Commented Jul 30, 2014 on How To Cook a Perfect Piece of Salmon at Ruth Reichl
Is this by Susan Perl, who drew the ads for Health-Tex in the 1960s?
Toggle Commented Aug 6, 2013 on 1967 doll illustrations at Found in Mom's Basement
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I think that Lewis's formulation, specifically, is largely focused on emotional manipulation: it is based on the equally false dilemma that if every word attributed to Jesus is not to be accepted as True and Right and Good, then every word attributed to Jesus must be rejected as False and Wrong and Evil. Lewis doesn't say merely "a madman" or "a mentally ill person", he says "the man who thinks he is a poached egg". He doesn't say "If Jesus wasn't telling the truth, he was lying"; he says if Jesus wasn't telling the truth, he must have been "the Devil of Hell". This is poison for the well -- and, I believe, intentional and deliberate poison. There's more to it even than "How can you accuse me of worshiping a liar or a lunatic?" -- I perceive a strong note of "What kind of horrible person are you, to say that 'love thy neighbor' is no more valid than 'I am a poached egg', or that 'Let the one without sin cast the first stone' is a statement from the Devil of Hell?"
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You might be interested in doing some of the research Philip Howard apparently couldn't be bothered to do. For one thing, Mother Teresa's order most assuredly DID have "that kind of $$$$" to pay for installation of an elevator: she simply refused to allow the disabled the "luxury" of making their own way to the upper floors, rather than being carried. The City of New York OFFERED TO PAY FOR THE ELEVATOR -- and "Mother" refused. Her order's ostentatious humility ("Look at us, we're so humble we carry disabled people up and down the stairs! See how humble we are!") was more important to her than allowing disabled persons some measure of independence. http://www.nytimes.com/1990/09/17/nyregion/metro-matters-fight-city-hall-nope-not-even-mother-teresa.html?pagewanted=2
Toggle Commented Sep 2, 2011 on Book Review at Wild Clutter
"Pack light" -- this is news? Hint: talk to experienced travelers. You will never hear one say, "Every year I pack heavier."
William Lane Craig: "I think that a good start at this problem is to enunciate our ethical theory that underlies our moral judgements. According to the version of divine command ethics which I’ve defended, our moral duties are constituted by the commands of a holy and loving God. Since God doesn’t issue commands to Himself, He has no moral duties to fulfill. He is certainly not subject to the same moral obligations and prohibitions that we are. For example, I have no right to take an innocent life. For me to do so would be murder. But God has no such prohibition. He can give and take life as He chooses. We all recognize this when we accuse some authority who presumes to take life as “playing God.” Human authorities arrogate to themselves rights which belong only to God. God is under no obligation whatsoever to extend my life for another second. If He wanted to strike me dead right now, that’s His prerogative. "What that implies is that God has the right to take the lives of the Canaanites when He sees fit. How long they live and when they die is up to Him." Shorter William Lane Craig: "God is bigger than we are and can beat us up. Therefore, it is right that we worship Him and praise His Holy Name and give Him our lunch money and accept that sometimes He will take our lunch money and beat us up anyway just because He wants to."
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Now I'm all hungry.
Toggle Commented Jan 14, 2011 on Ad Hoc Soup at Greta Christina's Blog
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Yeah, because God knows the world would fly out of its orbit and go crashing into the sun if there were a SINGLE market segment that the Walton family didn't have a slice of.
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Is it my imagination, or does the upper pic feature a dress made out of an old green chenille bedspread?
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Nice Merry Widow.
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It amuses me to observe that this ad and the one immediately preceding it both advertise products which are EXACTLY THE SAME COLOR.
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Great one. The currently popular iteration of "everything has a cause" is called the Kalam Cosmological Argument, and it's usually rendered as, "Everything that begins to exist has a cause. The universe began to exist. Therefore, the universe has a cause." See, they've very tidily eliminated the "but where did God come from?" question even before it can be asked. God didn't begin to exist, the argument runs, so he didn't need a cause. It must be handy to have an argument that comes with its special pleading already preinstalled.
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Stick to Filling Foods. (But if whole grains are FF, and milk is FF, how come cheese popcorn *isn't*?)
Toggle Commented Feb 23, 2010 on Candy ads from the 1950s at Found in Mom's Basement
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I had the Suzy Homemaker oven when I was too young for it, and only ever got to bake with it once. Later when I was the right age, I pleaded with Mother for an Easy-Bake and she said I didn't need one because I'd *already had the Suzy Homemaker*. Oh well, even if I'd had it I'd only ever have gotten to bake with it once. (That's how my mother's mind worked: if you'd done something once, you didn't need to do it again.)
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Only one Point for that whole package? Oh ... right. Ration points, not Weight Watchers Points. (I do tend to forget, here in Leftpondia, how long rationing went on in the UK.)
Toggle Commented Feb 22, 2010 on Candy ads from the 1950s at Found in Mom's Basement
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English Leather always reminds me of that scene in _The Wonder Years_ where Kevin douses himself in his father's aftershave; later that evening Winnie leans towards him, inhales, and tells him, "You smell like a saddle."
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What struck me was not the outdated word "Negro" itself, but the use of the singular-noun-as-collective: the entire African American population referred to collectively as "the Negro".
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In one of Shirley Jackson's stories, set in 1956 or '57, a group of Japanese tourists visit her family in their home. One of the visitors asks her what her blouse cost: she admits (keeping her voice down, so her husband won't hear) that it was a very steep eleven dollars, adding significantly, "It's nylon." And there's a scene in one of "Uncle Arthur's Bedtime Stories" (remember those?) in which the little girl complains that she'll have to wear her old cotton party dress when all the other girls will be wearing new dresses of silk and even nylon.
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I'm not sure how to describe my kid brother's diet: "picky" is one description, but so is "had the culinary tastes of a seven-year-old child". He quite literally lived on pizza, cheeseburgers, macaroni and cheese, Pop-Tarts, Cap'n Crunch, peanut butter sandwiches, fried-egg sandwiches, and popcorn chicken. I have no memory of him ever eating a piece of fruit except for a sliced orange. My brother died of congestive heart failure at the age of thirty-seven.
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Notice the near-complete lack of merchandising tie-ins. Except for a couple of items on the Corgi page there are *no* products connected with a movie or TV show. (Wow, kids actually had to make up their own games!)
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Leaving aside the challenging issue of chocolate Jell-O, can you imagine any modern company advertising its product by claiming it "required very little digestive effort"?
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1960s television color was the opposite of "natural", as anyone knows who's old enough to remember trying to adjust the color balance to get the skin tones just the right shade of luminescent orange with just a *hint* of neon green.
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THANK YOU. I have had so much trouble convincing people that there really was such an entity as Growing Up Skipper!
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A cigarette "clears the palate"? Most of the smokers I know are to one degree or another anosmic, although many of them don't realize it. Certainly anybody who smoked this much during one meal wouldn't be able to tell the coffee from chicken soup or a mug of the dishwater the roasting pan soaked in.
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Indeed: actually the idea of eating it in front of the TV was an afterthought. It was called a "TV dinner" because the idea of a whole multi-course meal in an easy-to-heat tray was as new and exciting as TV! The original box even looked like a TV set. (The second menu, after turkey, was banana-flavored chicken. Not intentionally: the boxes were printed with a bright yellow dye that leached a strong and objectionable banana flavor into the food.
Toggle Commented Nov 29, 2009 on Happy Thanksgiving at Found in Mom's Basement
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