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SVourvoulias
Pennsylvania
Latina editor, writer, blogger, mom and wife
Recent Activity
I think it is valuable for readers. I chanced upon it, then sought out many of award winners to read.
I've had other fair trade coffees and mostly been pretty happy with the flavor. My email is svourvoulias (at) yahoo (dot) com.
Actually, Beth, in a quirky sort of coincidence, Philly Moms posted this ON my birthday! I had completely forgotten about the 20th birthday party (with all the attendant drama - which I created, if memory serves). I had even forgotten the cake. Whose idea was it to get us a cake from that place? Not exactly Cake Boss. ;-) I can't believe I was ever that young, can you? Love and Happy Birthday back to you.
Toggle Commented Jun 16, 2010 on Let’s dance at Philly Moms
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Undoubtedly you are right, Elizabeth. I derive a certain amount of enjoyment, however, from examining the difference between our intellectual and emotional understanding of things (I am, as I'm sure you've noted from reading both my blogs, self-reflective to the point of insufferability). Our appearance (especially our aging appearance) is one aspect in which that disconnect manifests most acutely.
Toggle Commented Jun 15, 2010 on Let’s dance at Philly Moms
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So, my car was in the shop for a month while the mechanic replaced a fuel pump and assorted parts that seem unusually hard to secure given that the car is foreign. And old. I got it back about a... Continue reading
Posted Jun 15, 2010 at Philly Moms
Love this. Often love the music you post. Often love your posts altogether.
Toggle Commented Jun 11, 2010 on Thursday's Tune at Myth & Moor
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My daughter plots weather patterns. No, she doesn't want to grow up to be a meteorologist. It's part of her honors science class, and, throughout this past first year of high school for her, the class has prompted some very... Continue reading
Posted Jun 7, 2010 at Philly Moms
There's no feel-good solution for this quandary. We took care of my grandmother at home when she could no longer care for herself (Many Latinas, like my mother, are phobic about the idea of nursing homes). And while that was great in terms of keeping my grandmother in the familial hub, it definitely took a toll on the family - especially my brothers and I who gave up our afterschool activities and weekends (even in college) to be caregivers. And the truth is, no matter the amount of time you spend with the incapacitated parent or grandparent - or the ideal situation - we all end up feeling as if we should have done more, and better. Some suggestions from articles we've run about helping elders settle into this sort of situation: You can help make the room feel homier by decorating it or refreshing the decor: freshly cut flowers, sea shells, items that remind her of her childhood or interests from way back (since those long-term memories seem to be retained longer) provided the institutional policy permits it . Bring photo albums to leaf through together; a portable DVD player with movies she liked to watch together; favorite books, even plush stuffed animals seem to make a difference to the residents. Staying for a meal with her may make it feel less institutional for her (again, depending on the policy). A labeled notebook with a pen attached so that her visitors can write her notes is a nice thing for those with short-term memory loss. Recruit others (friends, neighbors, family members) to visit also on alternate days. Hang in there.
Toggle Commented Jun 3, 2010 on The Final Move at Philly Moms
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Hmmm. I think there's a strong geeky streak in quilters.... ;-)
Toggle Commented Jun 2, 2010 on Let that geek flag fly at Philly Moms
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Undoubtedly true, Elizabeth. It's rarely possible to trace only one cause for an alarming effect. But it seems to me many people attribute the problem mostly to a highly sexualized society - magazines, movies, music, etc. - without fully examining the way language (something parents are much more in control of than the images entertainment media "sells" to our children) both reflects and affects our children. Unfortunately, parents too engage in language that objectifies (referring to other adults as an isolated anatomical part, for example) without thinking about what exactly that teaches their kids.
Toggle Commented Jun 1, 2010 on Whose 'body' are you? at Philly Moms
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So let me just say, upfront, that until fairly recently I didn’t know I was a geek. It took reading Junot Diaz’s profane but moving Pulitzer-prize-winning novel, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, to understand that I am. I... Continue reading
Posted Jun 1, 2010 at Philly Moms
Thanks, Melissa, that's great. Apparently, the term is more frequently used by boys in reference to the girls they've slept with, than by the girls. But either way, not good.
Toggle Commented May 31, 2010 on Whose 'body' are you? at Philly Moms
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I love language and enjoy keeping track of the weird, convoluted ways living languages evolve. This exasperates my teenage daughter since I'm forever asking her to define terms I've only heard come out of her mouth, or her friends'. "Meh"... Continue reading
Posted May 31, 2010 at Philly Moms
Beth! Love the nicknames. Love that you found me through my blogs. Email forthcoming. :-)
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It's interesting, isn't it, how we're all assumed to be either Mexican or Puerto Rican (more commonly the assumption here in the Northeast, although that is changing a bit now).
Toggle Commented Apr 7, 2010 on How do I count? at Philly Moms
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My daughter loves your comment best. (I wonder why?) ;-)
Toggle Commented Apr 7, 2010 on How do I count? at Philly Moms
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I do wonder how it will be for my daughter later in life and how exactly she will see and/or experience her Latina side, Elizabeth. For now, though, she cannot -- given my focus on advocating for immigrants and the negative feelings about Latinos the immigration debate has brought to light -- set it aside and pretend it isn't part of who she is, or even make it less than it is. This is a kid, after all, who was called an "illegal" by a classmate who wanted to insult her, and a kid who made her teacher change a sentence her class was to diagram because it referred to undocumented immigrants as "illegal aliens." (A very weird sentence to be diagramming, let me just say.) She, like a lot of children of first gen immigrants, cannot speak Spanish (but knows full well to doubt the way I pronounce words I'm not really familiar with, since I always pronounce them as if they were Spanish). She isn't surrounded by Spanish all the time (as my husband doesn't speak it) but is when we get together with the rest of my family; she helps me make Guatemalan tamales, and the only Masses she's been to that she can remember have been celebrated in Spanish and filled with members of the fairly varied Hispanic community of the Philadelphia-area. Sure, she'd probably prefer to be English or Japanese or even Canadian (more about that in a later blog post) but she doesn't have a single doubt about who she really is -- even as a teenager. As far as the use of the word Anglo -- the friends I was refering to (and, in my experience, the ones who most object to my identifying as a Latina) have all been Americans who identify as having Anglo-Saxon ancestry rooted in the British Isles -- so, not Polish Americans, Irish Americans, Italian Americans or my Ashkenazi or Sephardic Jewish friends. Ergo, Anglos. :-)
Toggle Commented Apr 7, 2010 on How do I count? at Philly Moms
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Mar 15, 2010