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Tantor
Washington, DC
Former USAF F-4E WSO turned computer geek in dC.
Interests: History, military, aviation, writing, photography, shooting, conservative politics.
Recent Activity
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Art Lacey was a crazy sumbitch. You have to understand that from the beginning or this story will make no sense, not that it will anyway. Still, it's something you should know. Art was celebrating his birthday in 1947, had knocked back a few, and, from out of nowhere, proclaimed he was going to slap a B-17 bomber on top of his gas station. A friend of his told him he was crazy, which, of course, was true but made no never mind and was all the provocation Art needed to prove him wrong. Continue reading
Posted Oct 13, 2015 at BlackFive
The changes in the Earth's climate are neatly explained by eccentricities in the Earth's orbit around the sun and sunspots. The human contribution to climate change is trivial. The computer models for anthropogenic global warming (AGW) don't work. Based on past data and known climate, 95% of them predict a warmer climate than actually happened. If you can't predict the past, your predictions of the future have no value, The scientific method requires you to produce falsifiable propositions for your thesis, ie tests that would prove it wrong. The global warming doomsday cultists claim warmer weather proves AGW, but so does cooler weather as well as temperate weather. If everything proves your thesis, then you are not a scientist, but a cultist engaging in cargo cult science.
Toggle Commented Jun 3, 2014 on Funding both sides of the war at BlackFive
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Bergdahl looks like a stupid asshole from a family of stupid assholes. That said, he's our stupid asshole whom we are obligated to rescue, if only to maintain the principle of leaving no one behind. Bergdahl looks like a lost soul who didn't know what the hell he was doing. He also seemed to be an oppositional character who was against whatever the status quo was. Reading the circumstances of his departure from his post, it seems like he had a head full of false assumptions about himself and the Taliban when he went traipsing off into the woods. From the terrified look on his face in the first propaganda videos, it looks like the Taliban disabused him of any compassionate feeling he foolishly assumed they would have for him, the idiot. There are knuckleheads like this in every war. There were about twenty-some GIs who defected to the North Koreans in the Korean War only to get a harsh education about their foolishness. Bergdahl will probably be court-martialed soon, followed by an author or two writing up his story in all its idiocy. Bergdahl probably isn't done screwing up his life yet. He's a stupid guy who will probably come to a stupid end.
Toggle Commented Jun 2, 2014 on Big problems with Bergdahl deal at BlackFive
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I just finished reading "Voices of the Pacific: Untold Stories from the Marine Heroes of World War II," by Adam Makos and Marcus Brotherton and what a fabulous read it was. The authors tracked down Marine veterans of the Pacific war, ie Guadalcanal, Peleliu, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa, and recorded them telling their tale. It's all oral history, their stories in their own words. It's like ten years of sitting on the front porch on Saturday nights and listening to your Grandpa tell his story of the great war he fought. The Journey of the Hero of the Pacific War started with the Pearl Harbor attack for most of these guys. They ran down to their local recruiting centers the day after the attack along with the best of the rest of the young men in their towns. Most of the vets featured in this book wound up in the Marines because the lines for the other military services were too long. It's impossible to convey on a clean white page the fear and horror and violence of combat with a suicidally determined foe in these cramped little islands. The stoic manner in which these veterans share their stories tends to downplay their experience. Yeah, I got shot, they say. This guy lost his arm. That guy, shot in the head. This other guy, vaporized in his fox hole by a direct hit. They tell it like they're mechanics working on difficult cars. Their universe of battle is entirely alien from our nice, fat, comfortable, safe civilian lives. The printed page is a slender reed through which only a tiny portion can be delivered of the experience of combat. You have to sit back now and then and strain your imagination to the limit to understand what they went through. Most of these vets had little trouble rejoining the civilian world after the war. Some got help for their wounds from the VA, but when that dried up, they figured out their own solutions and pressed on. Not many suffered from PTSD that they can recall. Some guys had nightmares, but they didn't remember what they were and only knew because their wives told them. Their therapy was living their lives, getting a job, getting married, buying a home, raising kids. They didn't look back, didn't talk about the war, they just got on with their lives. Yet, when they reached their later years and went to Marine reunions, they opened up about their war experiences with their friends who had been there. After some years of that, they began to worry that their memories would die with them. This book preserves those memories for future generations. It's the last chance to do so. In ten years, the Marines who stormed the beaches in the Pacific will all be gone. There will be nobody left in living memory who went bayonet to bayonet with the Japanese. Way back when, in a different life, when I was flying those fancy fighter jets for the Air Force, I touched down on some of those contested islands in the Pacific. At Clark Air Base in the Philippines, where I was stationed, the last few hundred Japanese holed up in caves on Lilly Hill, next to the commisary, and fought it out to the death. Now and then, the monsoon rains would wash a grenade down hill into the playground of the elementary school behind it. The descendants of the Japanese troops who fought there would return periodically to the top of the hill to honor their ancestors. They'd put up thin foot high stakes, like big popsicle sticks, covered with bold Japanese writing, to commemorate their dead. They would drink a toast to them on that hill. The sake containers, made of wax paper like milk cartons, would be littered about the memorial stakes. On Guam, there is a national park built around a Japanese bunker dug into a coral head. Japanese tourists swarm Guam and visit the battlefields where their family fought. There is no memorial to US troops who fought and died there. The Japanese even voyage to Midway to commemorate their dead. There is a stone memorial to our troops there, in front of an old bunker, dirty and overgrown with weeds. Somewhere along the line, America forgot its heroes. Once upon a time, our heroes were our neighbors who fought and bled for America against implacable enemies on bleak coral islands. Now America's heroes are supposed to be the homeless, unwed mothers, and racial grievance mongers. How did we fall so far? These stories are something of an antidote to all that nonsense. You have a duty to hear these vets out, absorb their stories, and pass them on. They saw their duty to America and gave it everything they had without regret. What a welcome contrast to the current crop of kids who think America owes them everything. As duty goes, this is enjoyable duty. It's a hard book to put down. When you are done, you might pass it on to a young future Marine. Continue reading
Posted Dec 28, 2013 at BlackFive
What an excellent idea! If we ban guns, they'll become as scarce as heroin and cocaine and marijuana!
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From the American Digest: My name, "Gerard Van der Leun," is an unusual one. So unusual, I've never met anyone else with the same name. I know about one other man with my name, but we've never met. I've seen his name in an unusual place. This is the story of how that happened. It was an August Sunday in New York City in 1975. I'd decided to bicycle from my apartment on East 86th and York to Battery Park at the southern tip of the island. I'd nothing else to do and, since I hadn't been to the park since moving to the city in 1974, it seemed like a destination that would be interesting. Just how interesting, I had no way of knowing when I left. August Sundays in New York can be the best times for the city. The psychotherapists are all on vacation -- as are their clients and most of the other professional classes. The city seems almost deserted, the traffic light and, as you move down into Wall Street and the surrounding areas, it becomes virtually non-existent. On a bicycle you own the streets that form the bottom of the narrow canyons of buildings where, even at mid-day, it is still cool with shade. Then you emerge from the streets into the bright open space at Battery Park. Tourists are lining up for Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty. A few people are coming and going from the Staten Island Ferry terminal. There are some scattered clots of people on the lawns of Battery Park. Everything is lazy and unhurried. I'd coasted most of the way down to the Battery that day since, even though it appears to be flat, there is a very slight north to south slope in Manhattan. I arrived only a bit hungry and thirsty and got one of the dubious Sabaretts hot dogs and a chilled coke from the only vendor working the park. The twin towers loomed over everything, thought of, if they were thought of at all, as an irritation in that they blocked off so much of the sky. It was 1975 and, Vietnam not withstanding, America was just about at the midway point between two world wars. Of course, we didn't know that at the time. The only war we knew of was the Second World War and the background humm of the Cold War. It was a summer Sunday and we were in the midst of what now can be seen as "The Long Peace." In front of the lawns at Battery Park was a monument that caught my attention. It was formed of an immense stone eagle and two parallel rows of granite monoliths about 20 feet wide, 20 feet tall and 3 feet thick. From a distance you could see that they had words carved into them from top to bottom. There was also a lot of shade between them so I took my hot dog and my coke and wheeled my bike over, sitting down at random among the monoliths. I remember that the stone was cool against my back as I sat there looking at the stone across from me on that warm afternoon. As I looked up it dawned on me that the words cut into the stones were all names. Just names. The names of soldiers, sailors and airmen who had met their death in the north Atlantic in WWII. I was to learn later that there were 4,601 names. All lost in the frigid waters, all without any marker for their graves -- except those in the hearts of those they left behind, and their names carved into these stones that rose up around me. I read across several rows, moving right to left, then down a row, and then right to left. I got to the end of the sixth row and went back to the beginning of the seventh row. At the beginning of the seventh row, I read the name: "Gerard Van der Leun." My name. Cut into the stone amongst a tally of the dead. If you have an unusual name, there's nothing that prepares you for seeing it in a list of the dead on a summer Sunday afternoon in Battery Park in 1975. I don't really remember the feeling except to know that, for many long moments, I became chilled. When that passed, I knew why my name was in the stone. I'd always known why, but I'd never known about the stone or the names cut into it. "Gerard Van der Leun" was, of course, not me. He was someone else entirely. Someone who had been born, lived, and died before I was even conceived. Gerard Van der Leun was my father's middle brother. He was what my family had given to stop Fascism, Totalitarianism and Genocide in the Second World War. He was one of their three sons. He was dead before he was 22 years old. His body never recovered, the exact time and place of his death over the Atlantic, unknown. Read it all at "The Name in the Stone." via Ace of Spades Continue reading
Posted Nov 13, 2013 at BlackFive
We have no national interest in striking Syria. None. All of the players are bad and should lose. Asad is a murdering dictator. The insurgents are Islamist scum who we should never want to win and acquire Syria's stockpiles of chemical weapons and manpads. The Syrian people celebrated the Sep 11 attacks and sent thousands of jihadis to Iraq to kill our boys. There are no sympathetic characters here. I can't think of a brief bombing campaign that had any effect on any enemy anywhere. LBJ's ten day Linebacker II campaign is a case in point. LBJ thought he could bomb the commies to the negotiation table but they just stalled him out. The way bombing works is that its effects are cumulative. The longer you do it, the more you bring your opponent to collapse. If you bomb in penny packets, it gives the bad guys time to gather themselves together. It's like boxing with somebody one round every week. You will prolong the fight to no effect. Airpower is powerful but its effects are fleeting. By contrast, troops on the ground are relatively weak but persistent. They are complementary. Airpower works best when followed up by ground troops to secure the target area and hold it. Bearing that in mind, a brief air campaign against Syria will be ineffective without a ground campaign. And we don't want troops in Syria. Macchiavelli said do no enemy a slight harm. Same goes for bombing. A feckless and desultory bombing does not seriously harm an enemy while doing much to motivate him against you. In bombing, there is no substitute for victory. Assad is in an existential fight. If he loses, the insurgents will annihilate his Alawite people and hang his beheaded and mutilated body from a light pole. Consequently, he's going to throw everything he's got at the insurgents. If he had nukes, he'd use them. Bombing Assad does not change any of that, but entrenches him. Worse yet, when this mini-bombing campaign fails, Obama will be embarassed into escalating this war. And off we go. Obama does not know what he's doing. He's in over his head. Maybe he thinks intimidating Assad is like intimidating bankers back in Chicago into making bad loans to deadbeats for social justice. He's dragging America, kicking and screaming, into an ill-considered war with an impractical goal. He thinks he can control the violence, stop and start a war at will. Obama has learned nothing from history and is doomed to repeat it, taking us with him.
Toggle Commented Aug 30, 2013 on Syria, A Simple Question at BlackFive
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I, myself, am torn on the issue of laying Tamerlan Tsarnaev's remains to rest, whether to simply feed him to the hogs or burn it on a pile of Korans. Which of these? Which?
Toggle Commented May 7, 2013 on What the hell is wrong with you?! at BlackFive
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It is interesting that nobody in the media speculated that the bombers might be Occupy Wall Street anarchists, considering the last five guys convicted for terror bomb plots have been OWSers and very white guys. You'd think that would make Sirota happy, them being white.
Toggle Commented Apr 24, 2013 on Hoping it was Right Wing Whitey at BlackFive
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Having the first two females fail the Marine Infantry Officer Course is proof, to the politically correct, that the course is biased against women. It is inevitable that some excruciating liberal female congresswoman or senator will demand that the course get rid of its bias so that women pass it. So, standards will be lowered to push women through and the politicians will be there at their graduation to say what wonderful progress this is. And then those female infantry officers will fail in combat and get themselves and their troops killed. I see this happenning as if it already happenned. The Left is so predictable. I take no joy in my prediction.
Toggle Commented Oct 18, 2012 on Do I Have To Say I Told Them So? at BlackFive
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The politically correct version of the September 11 attacks holds that the Muslim world rejected such violence as un-Islamic and condemned the attacks. This is not true. The Muslim world celebrated the attacks. I took a trip to Egypt a few years ago to do the usual tourist lap around the pyramids and up the Nile. Our guide was a Coptic Christian. During a quiet moment in Cairo, I asked him what the Egyptian reaction was to Sep 11. He said they celebrated. They marvelled at the cleverness of the attackers and considered it quite a victory. After a month, the government decided that such public celebrations of American deaths were not in its best interests and prohibited them. That stopped them cold, though they continued behind closed doors. Here are some anecdotes of those celebrations, anecdotes that never seemed to have been picked up by the liberal media. In Germany, Muslims celebrated with rockets: But tolerance of Muslim immigrants began to change in the aftermath of Sept. 11, 2001. Parallel to the declarations of "unconditional solidarity" with Americans by the German majority, rallies of another sort were taking place in Neukölln and Kreuzberg. Bottle rockets were set off from building courtyards, a poor man's fireworks: two rockets here, three rockets there. Altogether, hundreds of rockets were shooting skyward in celebration, just as most Berliners were searching for words to express their horror. For many German residents in Neukölln and Kreuzberg, Vogelsang recalls, that was the first time they stopped to wonder who their neighbors really were. "In Germany, Muslims grow apart"; Peter Schneider; New York Times; December 4, 2005 Elisabetta Burba of the Wall St Journal documents the reaction in Beirut: Whooping It Up In Beirut, even Christians celebrated the atrocity. BY ELISABETTA BURBA Wall Street Journal; Saturday, September 22, 2001 12:01 a.m. EDT BEIRUT--Where were you on Sept. 11, when terrorists changed the world? I was at the National Museum here, enjoying the wonders of the ancient Phoenicians with my husband. This tour of past splendor only magnified the shock I received later when I heard the news and saw the reactions all around me. Walking downtown, I realized that the offspring of this great civilization were celebrating a terrorist outrage. And I am not talking about destitute people. Those who were cheering belonged to the elite of the Paris of Middle East: professionals wearing double-breasted suits, charming blond ladies, pretty teenagers in tailored jeans. Trying to find our bearings, my husband and I went into an American-style cafe in the Hamra district, near Rue Verdun, rated as one of the most expensive shopping streets in the world. Here the cognitive dissonance was immediate, and direct. The café's sophisticated clientele was celebrating, laughing, cheering and making jokes, as waiters served hamburgers and Diet Pepsi. Nobody looked shocked, or moved. They were excited, very excited. An hour later, at a little market near the U.S. Embassy, on the outskirts of Beirut, a thrilled shop assistant showed us, using his hands, how the plane had crashed into the twin towers. He, too, was laughing. Once back at the house where we were staying, we started scanning the international channels. Soon came reports of Palestinians celebrating. The BBC reporter in Jerusalem said it was only a tiny minority. Astonished, we asked some moderate Arabs if that was the case. "Nonsense," said one, speaking for many. "Ninety percent of the Arab world believes that Americans got what they deserved." ... In the seven days we spent in Lebanon, we saw one young Arab woman with teary eyes. "The stories of the victims touched me," she said, and I began to regain my trust in humanity. Then she added: "But in a way I am also glad, because for once the Americans are experiencing what we in the Middle East go through every single day." Back in Italy, I received a phone call from my friend Gilberto Bazoli, a journalist in Cremona. He told me he witnessed the same reactions among Muslims in the local mosque of that small Lombard city. "They were all on Osama bin Laden's side," he said. "One of them told me that they were not even worthy to kiss his toes." "An eyewitness to Arab 9/11 celebrations in Beirut," Elisabetta Burba, Wall Street Journal, September 22, 2001 12:01 a.m. EDT The reaction in the Egyptian newspapers: "In all honesty, and without beating around the bush: I am happy about [what happened to] America; I am happy about the great number of American dead. Let them accuse me of whatever they want. It doesn't matter and it does not lessen the happiness and excitement that overwhelm me. No one can make me take back what I say, no matter what their claims and explanations. All the innocent citizens who were killed are victims of America's barbarism and terror, ranging over half a century… Count up the number killed by American weapons in the world and compare it to the number of those killed in the US; you will find that the number of [American dead] is much less than one percent [of the latter]. I have a right to rejoice; I have a right to be filled with happiness; the Americans are finally tasting the bitterness of death." Ahmad Murad, Al-Arabi (Egypt), September 16, 2001 "[Those moments of] exquisite, incandescent hell were the most beautiful and precious moments of my life. The towers, the walls, [symbols] of the [American] regime, were a modern, terrifying monster infiltrated by a brave and stinging hornet… This mythological monster was terrible in its pain, in its screams, and in its fall, that resembled Hell. All the media… broadcast these images for us over and over. The generations of the past, and, with Allah's help, the generations to come, will envy us for having witnessed them." Muhammad Mustagab, Al-Usbu' (Egypt), September 17, 2001 (Describing his reaction to watching the skyjacked jets crashing into the World Trade Center) "In the eyes of Muslims, the US... Continue reading
Posted Sep 10, 2012 at BlackFive
The best thing to have done would probably be to have a service historian get oral histories on video along with the accounts of everyone involved now, when the facts are fresh, then throw it in the vault for twenty years. But then, this may be impossible in America, where everyone talks. All the top secret briefings I got as a fighter aircrew back in the 1980s, I have since seen in magazines and on cable TV, even the stuff that should never be told. The only stuff that stayed secret was the boring stuff. That said, I read the book, "No Easy Day," last week and it's pretty good. A nice, clean, fast read. I saw the author on Sixty Minutes last night. While I learned more detail, I don't know that I discovered much in the way of secret tactics. Perhaps the only thing was the use of infrared chemlites to clear rooms, but the Pakistanis surely found those after the SEALs left. The existence of a covert fueling station a short hop from Abbotabad was news to me, but something you could have guessed. Everything else in the story you could have guessed. I was surprised that the author said they rehearsed the mission a hundred times. I was also surprised that he described Bin Laden's women as so combative. You'd think after seeing men shot down in front of them, they would be more cowed. Maybe they know Americans don't shoot women down, like their own people do. Perhaps it was naive of me, but I was taken aback a bit by the fog of war miscommunication that even in this small, intensely rehearsed action by experienced professionals, the news of the downed helicopter didn't get out to the whole team. I wish we had captured Bin Laden alive, though I don't fault the SEALs for that. It would have been very interesting to thoroughly interrogate him and find out exactly who was involved. The Saudis played a role in supporting the attacks, perhaps the Pakistanis, too. Failing that, some enterprising journalist should go interview the Bin Laden women. They probably have a lot to say. We only know a portion of the Sep 11 story. Most of it remains hidden like the body of an iceberg, with many of the perpetrators unidentified and walking free.
Toggle Commented Sep 10, 2012 on Who is the Better Man? at BlackFive
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"The Sphere" was sculpted by Fritiz Koenig to symbolize world peace through world trade. For thirty years, it sat in the plaza between the towers of the World Trade Center until that terrible day when Muslim jihadis knocked them down for Islam, killing 2,977 innocent victims in all. "The Sphere" was dug out of the rubble and placed, battered and bruised, in Battery Park, within view of Freedom Tower, the new One World Trade Center now under construction. The bronze plaque which explains the significance of "The Sphere" says, "It was damaged during the tragic events of Sep 11, 2001 ...." It does explain that people lost their lives in "terrorist attacks," but is perfectly vague about who these terrorists might be. Nearby, the National September 11 Memorial & Museum is fiercely honest that Islamists were the terrorists, but the further you travel from Ground Zero, the more that fierce dedication to truth dissipates. New York postcards which urge people to never forget September 11 don't mention who did it. Bit by bit, the terrorist narrative of Sep 11 is being sanitized to become a narrative of tragedy, as if no malicious human agency was involved. More and more, Islam becomes invisible and Muslims disappear from the Sep 11 story and it is treated more like some natural catastrophe, as if a tsunami struck the World Trade Center and washed "The Sphere" down Broadway to Battery Park. The politically correct whitewashing is more striking every anniversary of Sep 11 when new documentaries of the day omit, more and more, any mention of Islam, Muslims, or jihadis. The liberal media now produces entire histories of the event that never mention the words "Muslim" nor "Islam." Imagine if the media omitted mention of Japan or Japanese in documentaries of the Pearl Harbor attack. Imagine if they whitewashed the reasons for the attack and treated it as if it were some natural catastrophe for which nobody were to blame. That would be quite a dishonest rendering of history, wouldn't it? I propose a remedy to keep the blame firmly fixed on the perpetrators. Fill your glass with the adult beverage of your choice as you watch documentaries about Sep 11 this week. Every time a segment plays out to the commercial break without mentioning Islam or Muslims, bottoms up! I can assure you that playing the Muslim Drinking Game for a few hours should leave you seriously plastered. Pace yourself. Continue reading
Posted Sep 9, 2012 at BlackFive
Obama has a long and established history of accepting adulation for work he never did. He was president of the law review who rarely showed up in its office (I'm working from home, he told the editor) and never wrote an article. He won the Nobel peace prize for, for, for, I guess for breathing. Now, his cronies would have you think he was fast roping down from the stealth chopper on Bin Laden's compound to put one in his head. "Follow me!" cried Obama, leading the SEALs up the staircase. And all of this, all of it, he feels he is entitled to it.
Toggle Commented Aug 20, 2012 on Obama Led the Raid to Get Usama? at BlackFive
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My guess is that there will always be some manned flying platforms just because every weapon in war never seems to be completely abandoned. The spear is one of the oldest weapons, yet we still slap a bayonet on an assault rifle to make it into a spear. Marines have been used on and off since Caesar assaulted Britain, always considered to become obsolete by new technology, yet reborn anew. In aviation, they're bringing back dirigibles as recycle platforms. Satellites have still not made the U-2 obsolete. I suspect that a drone fighter will be about as effective as a robot boxer. It wii suffer fro lag time in response, a critical vulnerability. Also, it's operators are looking at the drone's world through a straw, ie the video monitors.
Toggle Commented Jul 15, 2012 on We own the skies or who owns the skies? at BlackFive
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LBJ hung his pilots out as skeet. On one target, LBJs staff dictated that the B-52s all fly the identical route to the target in single file. The North Vietnamese figured it out after the first few jets and turned off their radar, simply aiming at the same spot where they knew the next B-52 would be. They lost so many jets from these stupid tactics dictated by that power mad micromanaging idiot, LBJ, that there was a near mutiny by the aircrews upon their return.
Toggle Commented Jul 15, 2012 on We own the skies or who owns the skies? at BlackFive
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I suspect there have been no gun kills because the missiles killed them first. You can fire a radar missile from ten miles away. You can fire a heater from a mile to half a mile, which is very close in an air to air fight. But you need to close to within a third of a mile to get a gun kill. By the time you get close enough to use your guns, the radar or heater missiles have killed the bandit. The gun to a fighter jet is something like the bayonet to the infantry. Nobody orders a bayonet charge anymore but it sure is good to have it around when all else fails and the combat gets close. A gun kill is up close and personal for a fighter. You need to close to about 2000 feet, which is scary close. It's like tailgating a car weaving in traffic on the freeway at 100 mph.
Toggle Commented Jul 15, 2012 on We own the skies or who owns the skies? at BlackFive
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There hasn't been a war yet that hasn't seen air-to air missiles fail. That's one reason why fighters have guns. Guns don't fail.
Toggle Commented Jul 15, 2012 on We own the skies or who owns the skies? at BlackFive
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Well, I would not deny that Clark Air Base was a hive of prostitution. It was. However, Chalmers Johnson waxes hyperbolic in his claims. At its peak, Clark hosted 15,000 residents, of whom many were dependents. While I've seen some guys do double, even triple, duty patronizing the bargirls, I doubt 10,000 men could support the 55,000 prostitutes Johnson claims lived in Angeles city. Also, back then Angeles only had about 60,000 residents, of whom the majority were not prostitutes. Nor do I believe that 10,000 men could support the 2,182 bars Johnson says were registered "rest and recreation" centers. As I recall, the flight surgeon briefed us that there were about 200 bars along the perimeter fence or walking distance from the gate. Of course, this is not due to a military prostitution culture but due to the boiling hormones of twentysomethings, a phenomenon known the world around, except to Chalmers Johnson. Young men like their sex and so do the young women. If the women charged only ten bucks for a night (1983 prices), then I assure you they found eager customers. One bargirl told me she did about twenty men a month. I distinctly remember flocks of streetwalkers in Oahu propositioning the Japanese tourists, none of whom were in the US military. Vegas is full of prostitutes, too. When Las Vegas has a big event, women come from all over the region to make some extra cash as part-time prostitutes for the weekend. Anywhere you combine red-blooded men, women, and cash, there will be some hanky panky happenning. The military is just the tail on the dog of this thing.
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This is all part of Obama's Metrosexual Management Style of Leading From Behind: Delegate responsibility while retaining authority.
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I doubt that Israel will make an air attack on the Iranian nuke sites. They just don't have a long enough punch to do it. While Israel has a good number of fighter bombers, they don't have the tankers to get them to Iran. They only have about six tankers. They don't have tankers because their enemies live next door. An Israeli fighter hardly has its wheels in the well before they're flying over enemy territory. They hardly even need external tanks to get to the bad guys. There are about 300 nuke sites in Iran that need to be serviced. That means it can't be done in just a raid, like the Israelis did on single nuke sites in Iraq or Syria. It requires an air campaign that takes weeks. Israel just can't deliver that many bombs that far for that long. The only air force that can pull this off is the USAF and we aren't going to do it for a lot of reasons. The fact that an Israeli air attack is being talked about tells me the Israelis aren't serious about it. The Israelis have excellent operational security. All of their big operations are launched in surprise. One likely scenario is an Israeli spoiling attack on a small but critical subset of the nuke sites, perhaps half a dozen. If the Israelis can put a guided bunker buster into the centrifuge center where the Iranians are making the atom bomb fuel, then they can kick the atomic can down the road for a few years. All of this examination of Israel's inability to serious strike Iran also underlines the emptiness of Iran's perception of Israel as a threat. Israel poses no threat to Iran, except to its Muslim religious bigotry.
Toggle Commented Apr 23, 2012 on Will Israel attack Iranian nuke sites? at BlackFive
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Obviously this guy was an amateur. You don't throw smoke bombs in Nazi get togethers, but stink bombs. Or maybe you throw a couple skunks inside and padlock the door. Or maybe you drive by the local synagogues, gather up volunteers, and deposit them in the parking lot so the Nazis come out into a crowd of Jews with baseball bats. If you are not violently inclined, you take some coffee cans, fill them with dry ice, write Zyklon B on the side, and drop them through the roof onto Hitler's birthday cake.
Toggle Commented Apr 19, 2012 on Ask An Infantryman - Hitler's Birthday at BlackFive
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Some say this is a big scandal but I say it isn't big enough. If the investigation wants to find Secret Service agents and military members who consorted with prostitutes, should they really stop there? How about checking ALL the people in Obama's giant posse? Let's see if there are some State Dept or White House types checking out the local talent. Do you really think just the SS and military hit the whore houses? I'll betcha a hundred bucks somebody from the White House press office was doing the Macarena with Jolanda.
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Dontcha just hate it when you're in a gunship orbiting a bunch of jihadis planting an IED and just when you're about to hose them down, they blow themselves up? Maybe the last guy standing should get a T-shirt saying, "MY PALS WENT TO JIHAD AND ALL I GOT WAS THIS MANGLED AK-47". Continue reading
Posted Apr 7, 2012 at BlackFive
American Airlines begs to differ with Bill Ayers and says so quite sweetly in this commercial, "Putting Them First": http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x6iAMiJUu5g
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