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The_ararar
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On the gate allocation issue: in my country there are more train lines than places to stop the train, but the track is still always the same, only rarely changed if there are serious delays, in which case it's automatically announced through the PA system, in addition to showing on the screens as usual. In Italy instead, they have dynamic allocation, because the trains are always delayed and there are wild service fluctuations (although when there are no disruptions at all they always end up on the same tracks, so the baseline is static), which is what smithcorptweet says is what will happen in this bus terminal as well (due to the situation of the city and not a chronical lack of maintenance, investment and culture of punctuality). The system is oppressive because you have to run up and downstrairs if they suddenly change the assigned track. Having a semi-dynamic system (as long as the waiting areas or "terminals" are indicated beforehand) in a one-floor station fixes all these complaints, since you can calmly walk to the general area and wait there. One question I have: it seems like all these bus terminals shown on humantransit don't allow access to wheelchair users or aren't in general as comfortable to use as stops where the platform is at the same level of the vehicle floor. Why are there never kassel kerbs or similar devices?
Toggle Commented Dec 1, 2015 on Christchurch: A New Transit Hub at Human Transit
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the transition will surely be very slow and initially a driver will still be required and these will just be safety features. Although due to prices I'm not really sure on how long it will take to transition completely, considering that most cars on the road are low-end. So regardless of what happens, there will be decades to observe the effects (certain localities with lots of money and new cars will surely transition almost completely before most other places, thus providing statistics about everything) and adapt the legislation to avoid the negative effects of the massive induced demand of the cheap taxi-like service (regardless of whether it's your car or the transit agency's) that these cars will offer. Mobility pricing through congestion charges will surely spread to medium-sized cities as well.
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@Jarret We are still vastly better off than any other decade in the past despite of living in the car dystopia. So while it's not the optimal outcome, and we should avoid such things in the future, this is not a disaster, and I don't expect self-driving cars to cause one either. It's a missed opportunity. Also while states might have problems introducing mobility pricing and there is widespread opposition to any such proposal, I've actually seen some progress over the years in my car-dominated corner of Europe, and it has accelerated as the traffic got worse.
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@P thanks for making me discover where the melody of this cringe-inducing supermarket ad comes from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CteVUnp3a2Y (paraphrasis of the speech: he wants to thank the staff for the tips about what to cook for dinner the night before) @David Bickford I think that John's argument solves this issue: maybe Jarret is talking about city centres that are already dense enough to have rapid transit on their own and too big to provide everything at walkable distance at the same time. I don't know the city in question but looking at a satellite map it looks like the station is so far out that there's an suburby-looking neighbourhood of houses with gardens between it and the city centre. So I don't think it's optimal. But it seems to me that Jarrett is suggesting to ignore the issue of the station being too far out as a political salami slice tactic. You start by getting the high speed rail and its funding approved, and then promote a costly rapid transit link across the city later, otherwise the whole thing won't get done at all.
Toggle Commented Nov 22, 2015 on How Important is "Downtown"? at Human Transit
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If high-distance transit gets in the city center, you have eliminated the last mile problem for its users, without buses, thanks to the walkability. This increases its usefulness. This applies very much to small euro cities which only have buses with lowish frequency to offer to people as a last-mile transportation mean. Jarret has a point when it comes to bigger euro cities though: where the main train station for long distance trains is is kinda irrelevant because most people except tourists will have take the underground anyway to reach their final destination, even if they work in the retail centre, due to how big it is (and the ground floors are all occupied by shops for kilometers). Taking the example of Milan, the station is not in the city center but right outside its borders. Even the old one was so, although closer. There are 2 buts: 1. it's well-linked to the center with in-station underground links 2. the high-rise office buildings where built AFTER the rail was built, and they were built where the city underground rail passes and where the two biggest stations are, not in the city centers. So it may not be applicable to the US.
Toggle Commented Nov 22, 2015 on How Important is "Downtown"? at Human Transit
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Nov 21, 2015