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Tim Chesterton
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Glad you liked it, Rick. You and others who enjoyed Ruth's music might also want to check out 'The Wailin' Jennies', of which she is a founding member; they've been fairly inactive for the last couple of years, but for much of the past decade they were the closest thing that Canada had to folk superstars.
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Excellent.
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Although, Leslie, in all fairness you must also report that at the Edmonton International Airport, when you look at the 'arrivals' screen, all other things (I.e.weather!) being equal, the vast majority of the 'late' flights are Westjet flights. True. I have seen it over and over again.
Toggle Commented Dec 13, 2013 on A tale of two airlines at Brutally Honest
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Rick, that section on 'love for the poor' is a real beauty. Challenging, too, of course, but the Holy Spirit really spoke to me through it. Thanks for pointing it out.
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The Pope is not a leftist, the Pope is a Christian. Sometimes that means he'll sound like a leftist, sometimes a rightest, and sometimes something completely different, since Christianity does not fit seamlessly with any human political system.
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The key quote for me: 'Catholi­cism tran­scends polit­i­cal debates, and you will not under­stand it until you forgo the habit of talk­ing about it politically.' What he says about Catholicism is, I believe, true of Christianity in general. Real Christianity does not line up 100% with the ideology of any political party, and the attempt to make it do so will only distort it.
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God's blessings on them; what a lovely Thanksgiving gift!
Toggle Commented Nov 29, 2013 on Isabella! (UPDATED) at Brutally Honest
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Happy thanksgiving Ken, and Rick, and everyone here at BH.
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'The Abolition of Man' is one of Lewis' lesser-known books, but one of his most brilliantly-argued. Also 'The Great Divorce', based around the idea that the damned might occasionally get trips to heaven to see what they're missing; return to hell is optional. Sadly, most of them can't stand heaven and end up going back to 'the grey city'.
Toggle Commented Nov 25, 2013 on C. S. Lewis and the Knockout game at Brutally Honest
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Excellent stuff. Of course, Father Barron has never hidden the fact that he is a C.S. Lewis fan!
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Hey Rick, of course you're right, the 'Make it all the way' reference was to Catholicism, and I understood that immediately. But it is, you must admit, a rather disrespectful way to talk to other Christians. It implies that if you want to be a real, complete Christian, you have to become a Roman Catholic ('all the way'), as if other forms of Christianity are simply a halfway house. Well, you know, other Christians feel that way about Rome as well. I've heard Eastern Orthodox Christians describe the Pope as 'the original Protestant'! And it ignores the fact that many of us who are not Catholic have not made that decision out of ignorance but because, as Lewis says, we believe that there are important issues on which the RC Church has parted company with the primitive Christianity of the New Testament and the first few Christian centuries. Now you and I may disagree on that issue (none of which lessens our love and respect for each other) I agree that the piece was respectful of Lewis. It was not, however, respectful enough to investigate the reasons why he chose not to become a RC. It's true that he did not spell out those reasons in his published books - on account of the fact that, as he often said, he wanted to be an apologist for mere Christianity and not for any particular denominational tradition within Christianity. But he was questioned on the issue by a number of people in private correspondence, and he gave quite clear and precise replies. Since those letters have now all been published, I think the author of this article ought to have paid Lewis the compliment of at least including them in his piece ('Lewis never himself became a Catholic, because he believed...') rather than putting it down to the prejudices of Lewis' Ulster upbringing (really? three of Lewis' closest friends were J.R.R. Tolkien, Dr. Humphrey Havard, and George Sayer - all devout Catholics. Would he have included them among his friends if he had an irrational anti-Catholic prejudice?). I blame Sheldon Vanauken! He was the first one to set out this 'Lewis was warped into anti-catholic prejudice by his Ulster Protestant upbringing' nonsense!!! :) But thanks for the link, by the way. Over the next few days (between the anniversary of his death today and the anniversary of his birth next Friday) I intend to post more pieces on Lewis.
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Lewis 'Didn't maker it all the way'??? Come on! Lewis himself explained in several letters to friends why he was not a Roman Catholic. He referred in a letter to a nun to 'the things that separate you (Roman Catholics) from us (i.e. Anglicans), and, in my opinion, from the primitive church'. He further said that he was less interested in the nun's question ('Why aren't you a Catholic?') than the question 'Why should I be?' and had been unable to discover a compelling reason to convert to Rome (and remember, he had many Catholic friends and had ample opportunity to discuss with them the claims of the Catholic church). His best biographer, George Sayer (a personal friend of Lewis and himself a Catholic) says that Lewis examined a catholic breviary but remained entirely content with the Book of Common Prayer. I believe that we should not be observing the 50th anniversary of Lewis' death by trying to press him into the service of a particular Christian tradition. He himself preferred the label 'Mere Christian'. Let's respect him enough to take him at his word.
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This Anglican likes both the Rule of St. Benedict and beer!
Toggle Commented Nov 18, 2013 on Did you know? at Brutally Honest
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The Reason for God Redeemer Church
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Are you familiar with Tim Keller, Rick? His book 'The Reason for God' is a very fine popular apologetic and he's got good notes about further reading. I especially benefitted from some of the books about Christianity and science that he recommended.
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Nice one, Rick. I particularly warmed to your last paragraph or two.
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Oh. My. Goodness.!!! From a guy who's given our family hours and hours of pleasure as we've watched the antics of Calvin and Hobbes... this is truly amazing!
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Nailed. Thanks, Rick!
Toggle Commented Oct 9, 2013 on Have your plans been disrupted? at Brutally Honest
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Thank you, Rick. And Leslie, I know that Corrie Ten Boom story well; it's very inspiring. I would have put it in my sermon too, but I've told it so many times in St. Margaret's that I think people's eyes are glazing over when they hear me start to tell it yet again!
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No apology necessary Rick. I'm amazed you've gotten by so far without comment authentication.
Toggle Commented Oct 3, 2013 on Comment authentication enabled at Brutally Honest
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Pope Francis is hard to pin down and hard to classify. But then again, so was Jesus. Funny thing, that!
Toggle Commented Oct 2, 2013 on Dueling Catholics at Brutally Honest
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And I thank God for him, too. True Christianity isn't about left or right, it's about Jesus. My guess is that both left and right will always find things to like and things to dislike about him. That's the test: will we cling to our political loyalties or to our Lord? God knows, I'm sure I often get that wrong, but Pope Francis is encouraging this Anglican to do a better job of following Jesus.
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