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Timothy McAdoo
Washington, DC
Trainer in APA Style and for APA PsycINFO databases. http://www.timothymcadoo.com
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Each fall the APA Style Blog Team puts together a “best of” feature, and this year we continue the tradition with an updated set of posts from the APA Style Blog and our parent site, apastyle.org. We hope it will... Continue reading
Posted yesterday at APA Style Blog
Hi, Mike. We don't have an "official" reference form but because you have a working web page, you can follow that template (see http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/11/how-to-cite-something-you-found-on-a-website-in-apa-style.html), and your bracketed information does seem helpful for the reader. Note, though, that the name of the page you've linked appears to be "Up and running with Excel 2010" not "How to use Excel 2010."
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Hi, Kristen. Good question. Use lowercase letters. You can see an example on p. 173 of the Publication Manual. You might also find these two posts useful: You Can Quote Me on This and Block Quotations in APA Style.
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Hi, Laxsh. This means that different indices should appear in separate lines or columns, when possible, within the table. For example, rather than having a mean, SD, F, and p value all in one cell, the statistics should be in separate columns. You can see this in tables in our sample papers, including the sample published article, available at http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/best-of-blog/
Toggle Commented Aug 18, 2015 on Table Tips at APA Style Blog
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This is not stated as a "requirement" in the Manual but when numbers are aligned on the decimal points, they are usually easier to read. See, for example, the table on p. 146.
Toggle Commented Aug 17, 2015 on Table Tips at APA Style Blog
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The Manual does not specify, but you can see example tables beginning on p. 129. The type of content drives the decision on how to format the cell. You can also see an example table in this sample paper: http://www.apastyle.org/manual/related/sample-experiment-paper-1.pdf
Toggle Commented Aug 17, 2015 on Table Tips at APA Style Blog
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Generally speaking, notes go at the end of the table. You could also follow the format of Table 5.3 if you choose.
Toggle Commented Aug 17, 2015 on Table Tips at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Jennifer. This post on how and when to use "et al." will help: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2011/11/the-proper-use-of-et-al-in-apa-style.html
Toggle Commented Aug 13, 2015 on How to Cite Direct Quotations at APA Style Blog
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Hi. Good questions! Yes, italicize foreign words not common in English (i.e., not found as main entries in Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary). See http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/09/dear-professor.html#comment-6a01157041f4e3970b0133f5020940970b for examples. To your second question: That might depend on your school's dissertation guidelines. The Manual does not give guidelines for dissertations.
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The reference need not include "[Website]" after the title (see examples above and also at http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/11/how-to-cite-something-you-found-on-a-website-in-apa-style.html). The abbreviation (OWH) should also be used in the text only, not the reference (see more at http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2011/09/group-authors.html). For the in-text citation: Yes, you can use the paragraph number(s). See http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2013/11/how-to-cite-part-of-a-work.html.
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Hi, Jule. I'm sorry I missed this comment earlier. No, the order would be n.d.-a, n.d.-b, n.d.-c, etc. I'm not sure I understand the scenario you have in mind. Can you give more detail?
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You are correct that "In" is part of the format (it is comparable to the "In" in a chapter in an edited book reference: see http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2011/02/books-and-book-chapters-what-to-cite.html). Also, you don't have to include "fr." on that line. The URL in your reference will indicate it (e.g., https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychology)
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by Timothy McAdoo I was recently asked how to cite the directions created with Google Maps. Because Google Maps is not addressed specifically in the reference examples in the Publication Manual, it’s time to stitch together a Frankenreference. For this... Continue reading
Posted Aug 4, 2015 at APA Style Blog
Great question! I would not recommend changing those, as anything within the quotation marks should be an exact replica of the original. This is roughly comparable to the idea that you would not change British spelling (e.g., "colour") in a quote. However, you might consider paraphrasing the selection (while still including the full citation to the original authors), in which case you could leave out the numbering or change to (a), (b), (c) because you are using your own words.
Toggle Commented Jul 24, 2015 on Lists, Part 3: Lowercase Letters at APA Style Blog
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Hi, JP. You should not include the initials. Initials are needed only when your reference list includes publications by two or more primary authors with the same surname (see http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2014/01/when-to-use-author-initials-for-text-citations.html).
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Apologies for the slow reply. But, yes, you have it right!
Toggle Commented Jul 13, 2015 on How to Cite a Class in APA Style at APA Style Blog
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Yes, that's not a problem.
Toggle Commented Jul 9, 2015 on Lists, Part 4: Numbered Lists at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Laura. The Publication Manual's guidelines are for writing a manuscript, so some formatting issues like this are not included (because when published, the manuscript is typeset in a journal's format). If you are working on a paper, thesis, or dissertation, your school's guidelines may address these questions, and school guidelines often vary from APA Style in these and other details. To address your questions, I've borrowed from Stefanie's answer to a similar question above: Table 5.15 on pages 147–148 of the Publication Manual provides an example of a table that extends over two pages. You can carry over the column headers to second and subsequent pages. Don't carry over the table number and the title ("Table 5.15. Sample Multilevel Model Table," which is at the top of the second page of Table 5.15 is a label for the purposes of the Publication Manual, not the sample table's number or title). At the bottom of the first page, you can include "(continued)" at the bottom right corner. At the top left corner of the next page, you can include "(continued)". To your last question, you can have multiple tables in a row, but again, the guidelines may be different if you are writing a paper, thesis, or dissertation, so be sure to double-check.
Toggle Commented Jul 7, 2015 on Table Tips at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Alex. That's an interesting case! The reference fits the general format well, so it almost works, but I'm afraid it won't help a reader find the articles. It is probably better to create a reference for each article (and the special series information can be included in brackets within those references, if applicable and useful to the reader). This is because the combined format suggested does not include page numbers, which could make it harder for a reader to find these, especially as they are spread across issues. Also, is "Stories of art therapists of color" the actual name provided in the journal (i.e., could a later reader find it by looking for that title)? Or is it a description created by the author citing these articles?
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Use United States when it functions as a noun (e.g., "In the United States, ... ") and U.S. when it is an adjective (e.g., "The U.S. Constitution...").
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Hi, tcquail. It sounds like you're combining a list with block quotes? That's fine! Just ensure that you take a consistent approach and make sure the reader can easily discern your words from the quoted words. That is, the important thing is to make clear which words are quotes and what the original sources are.
Toggle Commented Jun 26, 2015 on Lists, Part 4: Numbered Lists at APA Style Blog
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That might not completely convey the intent of the original. When citations are included in the quotation, they should be included, to provide credit where due (see also http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/12/citations-within-quotations.html).
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Hi, Olivia. It looks like my original response did not post for some reason. My apologies! I hope this answer is still in time. To both questions, yes, cite all original sources, even if the original authors or dates are unknown. It will still help the readers if they want to see the original sources, and it ensures that you are giving credit where due. This post might help you format the references: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2012/05/missing-pieces.html
Toggle Commented Jun 16, 2015 on Table Tips at APA Style Blog
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If the tables are alike, you might use a consistent font size, but if they differ in format, you can probably use smaller font on only the one that needs it smaller font to fit. However, because you note that you are writing a dissertation, you should consult your school's dissertation guidelines. School guidelines frequently address formatting questions like those you've raised and also frequently vary from APA Style guidelines.
Toggle Commented Jun 16, 2015 on Table Tips at APA Style Blog
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Good question! There are no special guidelines for this, so yes, you'll end up with some block quotes and some quotes within paragraphs. However, you might choose to vary slightly from the usual style, as long as this is okay with your teacher/advisor/editor.
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