This is Timothy McAdoo's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Timothy McAdoo's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Timothy McAdoo
Washington, DC
Trainer in APA Style and for APA PsycINFO databases. http://www.timothymcadoo.com
Recent Activity
Hi, Laura. The Publication Manual's guidelines are for writing a manuscript, so some formatting issues like this are not included (because when published, the manuscript is typeset in a journal's format). If you are working on a paper, thesis, or dissertation, your school's guidelines may address these questions, and school guidelines often vary from APA Style in these and other details. To address your questions, I've borrowed from Stefanie's answer to a similar question above: Table 5.15 on pages 147–148 of the Publication Manual provides an example of a table that extends over two pages. You can carry over the column headers to second and subsequent pages. Don't carry over the table number and the title ("Table 5.15. Sample Multilevel Model Table," which is at the top of the second page of Table 5.15 is a label for the purposes of the Publication Manual, not the sample table's number or title). At the bottom of the first page, you can include "(continued)" at the bottom right corner. At the top left corner of the next page, you can include "(continued)". To your last question, you can have multiple tables in a row, but again, the guidelines may be different if you are writing a paper, thesis, or dissertation, so be sure to double-check.
Toggle Commented yesterday on Table Tips at APA Style Blog
1 reply
Hi, Alex. That's an interesting case! The reference fits the general format well, so it almost works, but I'm afraid it won't help a reader find the articles. It is probably better to create a reference for each article (and the special series information can be included in brackets within those references, if applicable and useful to the reader). This is because the combined format suggested does not include page numbers, which could make it harder for a reader to find these, especially as they are spread across issues. Also, is "Stories of art therapists of color" the actual name provided in the journal (i.e., could a later reader find it by looking for that title)? Or is it a description created by the author citing these articles?
1 reply
Use United States when it functions as a noun (e.g., "In the United States, ... ") and U.S. when it is an adjective (e.g., "The U.S. Constitution...").
1 reply
Hi, tcquail. It sounds like you're combining a list with block quotes? That's fine! Just ensure that you take a consistent approach and make sure the reader can easily discern your words from the quoted words. That is, the important thing is to make clear which words are quotes and what the original sources are.
Toggle Commented Jun 26, 2015 on Lists, Part 4: Numbered Lists at APA Style Blog
1 reply
That might not completely convey the intent of the original. When citations are included in the quotation, they should be included, to provide credit where due (see also http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/12/citations-within-quotations.html).
1 reply
Hi, Olivia. It looks like my original response did not post for some reason. My apologies! I hope this answer is still in time. To both questions, yes, cite all original sources, even if the original authors or dates are unknown. It will still help the readers if they want to see the original sources, and it ensures that you are giving credit where due. This post might help you format the references: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2012/05/missing-pieces.html
Toggle Commented Jun 16, 2015 on Table Tips at APA Style Blog
1 reply
If the tables are alike, you might use a consistent font size, but if they differ in format, you can probably use smaller font on only the one that needs it smaller font to fit. However, because you note that you are writing a dissertation, you should consult your school's dissertation guidelines. School guidelines frequently address formatting questions like those you've raised and also frequently vary from APA Style guidelines.
Toggle Commented Jun 16, 2015 on Table Tips at APA Style Blog
1 reply
Good question! There are no special guidelines for this, so yes, you'll end up with some block quotes and some quotes within paragraphs. However, you might choose to vary slightly from the usual style, as long as this is okay with your teacher/advisor/editor.
1 reply
Hi, Davina. It sounds like you're not adapting a figure but you are using data from another source. Just as you did in the text, you should cite your source for the data in a figure caption or table note. To your last question, it sounds like you may be talking about a table rather than a figure? You can find many examples of both tables and figures in Chapter 5 of the Manual. See also our sample paper: http://bit.ly/APAStyle-sample-paper
1 reply
You can see an example of the format for the personal communication in the Provide a Reliable Path to the Source section of http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/10/what-belongs-in-the-reference-list.html
1 reply
Hi, Ellie. You can use the template from the first green box in this post.
1 reply
Hi, Priscilla. This post will help: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2014/01/intranet-intrigue.html
1 reply
Hi, Jana. Great question. Please use the terminology you and/or the individual you are writing about feel is most appropriate. This supplement to Chapter 3 of the Manual should help. See, in particular, the final paragraph: http://supp.apa.org/style/pubman-ch03.12.pdf
Toggle Commented May 11, 2015 on A Little Respect at APA Style Blog
1 reply
Yes, you can use short phrases, and they need not appear verbatim in your paper, though they often do. Do you have an example in mind?
Toggle Commented May 11, 2015 on Keywords in APA Style at APA Style Blog
1 reply
That would be "non-White." You can see an example of this use on page 75 in the Publication Manual. See also the general guideline on page 100, in Table 4.3 (use hyphens for compounds in which the base word is capitalized, e.g., "pro-Freudian").
Toggle Commented May 7, 2015 on Spelling Success in APA Style at APA Style Blog
1 reply
Hi, amenez. Sorry for the late reply. Yes, italicize the word as it was in the original.
1 reply
Hi, Michael. That's a good point! For your own written words in your paper, the Publication Manual recommends using careful syntax, rather than italics, for emphasis. When providing a direct quote, though, you do sometimes want or need to emphasize the part of the quote that is most relevant. For those cases, we recommend using italics and adding "[emphasis added]" after the italicized portion. You can find the guideline for this on p. 173, in the "Adding emphasis" section, and an example on p. 92.
Toggle Commented May 6, 2015 on You Can Quote Me on This at APA Style Blog
1 reply
Hi, Caitlin. Good question. The citation should still appear after the period. So, ...carry forward strengths and positive experiences). (Author, year, p. #)
Toggle Commented Apr 30, 2015 on Block Quotations in APA Style at APA Style Blog
1 reply
Hi, D. Great question! You don't need to include "[Report]" in the title. However, the manual notes (p. 186) that you can include nonroutine information in brackets when it "is important for identification and retrieval." (See also http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/02/the-generic-reference-using-brackets.html) In this case, I would say "report" is unlikely to significantly help the user who tries to retrieve the document.
1 reply
Hi, Jule. Exercise and Sport Psychology is a proper noun, the name of the division, so all the words remain capitalized. It's usually a little easier to tell in a reference when that's the case. To your second question, some pages include publication dates and some do not. You should find this post helpful (including the questions/answers in the comments): http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/01/the-generic-reference-when.html
1 reply
Hi, Bruno. Yes, the "P" should still be capitalized. "(a) People live and die; (b) they laugh and cry; (c) they love some and hate others." is a complete clause. Note that I changed your numbers to letters. See http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/02/lists-part-3-lowercase-letters.html and http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/02/lists-part-4-numbered-lists.html for our recommendations on when to use letters or numbers for a list.
1 reply
You can use the templates in the "Social Media Page" section of this post: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2013/10/how-to-cite-social-media-in-apa-style.html That would give you American Psychological Association. (n.d.). Home [LinkedIn page]. Retrieved April 17, 2015, from https://www.linkedin.com/company/american-psychological-association
1 reply
Hi, Olivia. Yes, I think you can cite the subchapter just as you would cite a chapter. Are each of the subchapters listed in a table of contents?
1 reply
Hi, Bruno. I agree. "People live and die; they laugh and cry; they love some and hate others." is one complete sentence. I would capitalize "People."
1 reply
Image
by Timothy McAdoo (Note: Key terms are not the same as keywords, which appear under an abstract. For more about keywords, see my previous post.) In creative writing, italics are commonly used to emphasize a particular word, simulating the emphasis... Continue reading
Posted Apr 14, 2015 at APA Style Blog