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Timothy McAdoo
Washington, DC
Trainer in APA Style and for APA PsycINFO databases. http://www.timothymcadoo.com
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The following post should help, particularly the "Original or Unattributed Material" section: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2012/09/how-to-cite-course-packs.html
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If you are quoting from the table, you can simply enclose the part you are using in quotation marks and cite as usual (see also How to Cite Part of a Work). However, it sounds like you might be reproducing or adapting the complete table. In that case, you format as a table, make style changes as needed, and then credit the adapted source. Reproducing in this manner may require permission from the copyright holder. You can find more information about that on p. 38 of the Publication Manual. And, you can see examples in Chapter 5 (see, e.g., the table note on p. 142).
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on Table Tips at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Dana. Generally, colons can be followed by incomplete clauses, as in "Companies: must take into account..." An em dash, rather than a hyphen, can also be used in the same way. However, it sounds like your teacher or editor could have different expectations for the bulleted list. You'll need to ask him or her to really be sure.
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on Computer Editing Tip: En Dashes at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Lauri. Thanks for bringing that to our attention! The title should not be italicized. We've updated the example above. Another post that your students might find useful has additional examples: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/11/how-to-cite-something-you-found-on-a-website-in-apa-style.html.
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Hi. Good question. You can follow the template of citing a Wikipedia page (see http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2009/10/how-to-cite-wikipedia-in-apa-style.html), because this is a wiki page that is subject to change.
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Hi, Becki. Yes, if your quote has 40 or more words, use the block quotation format. However, ask your teacher or writing instructor about other ways you might approach this. You might find similar lists of symptoms in multiple sources, for example, and then summarize and cite them all.
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You may be able to adapt the examples on pp. 206-207. Note, though, that references should point the reader to a retrievable source document. (see http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/10/what-belongs-in-the-reference-list.html)
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Hi, Satyagraha. 1) Yes, reproduce the title just as the organization presents it. Note "Seventh" in Example 37. 2) Lowercase is correct when not used in the meeting name. Note lowercase "meeting" in Example 36.
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Hi, Trudy-Ann. If the grant was published online, this post will have everything you need to know: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/11/how-to-cite-something-you-found-on-a-website-in-apa-style.html
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The retrieval date is rarely needed. We recommend including it it only if the content of the page may change. This is a general guideline and requires the author to use his or her judgment based on the type of webpage and the source document. The page in that example was a news story. Some news sites update their stories without creating new pages, so this may have been why the date was included. But, the story appears to be gone now, so it is difficult to say. Thank you for bringing this to our attention. These posts will also be useful and include relevant examples: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/01/the-generic-reference-who.html and http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2012/05/missing-pieces.html.
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Hi, Ava. That date (2014) is the copyright date for the entire website, but it does not necessarily indicate that the content on that particular page was published in 2014. Sometimes articles on a large website do include publication dates, and those can be used in the reference.
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Generally speaking, all links lead to web pages. Text in brackets is needed only when a more precise description applies and will help the reader. You can find more details at http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/02/the-generic-reference-using-brackets.html.
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Hi, Karen. Good question! There is no need to include the article number.
Toggle Commented Oct 15, 2014 on A Stylish Guide to Holiday Viewing at APA Style Blog
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You don’t have to include the citations. (If you were to quote the sentence directly, you would need to include the citations; see http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/12/citations-within-quotations.html).">http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/12/citations-within-quotations.html). However, you certainly can, if you feel they are important to note. (Just one example of why you might feel they are important: “Citing the works of Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung, and others, Smith (2014) determined that…”)
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For anyone wondering, the general guideline that Yolanda is asking about is described in more detail here: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2011/06/capitalization-after-colons.html.
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Hi, Yolanda. Capitalize only the first word after the colon.
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Hi, Sylvia. That is all fine.
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Exactly. Block quotations are a little different. This post has everything one might need to know: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2013/06/block-quotations-in-apa-style.html (It sounds like you've read that post already, but I'm posting it here for future readers.)
Toggle Commented Sep 24, 2014 on How to Cite Direct Quotations at APA Style Blog
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Yes, you've got it. You can find an example just like that on p. 173 in the Manual, too.
Toggle Commented Sep 24, 2014 on How to Cite Direct Quotations at APA Style Blog
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You can treat quotes from participants just as you would other quotes, using block format for those of 40 words or more. The Manual does not indicate any special formatting or other guidelines specifically for quoting participants. (You might also find this post useful: Let’s Talk About Research Participants.) If in APA Style, the block quotation should not be in italics.
Toggle Commented Sep 24, 2014 on Block Quotations in APA Style at APA Style Blog
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Use just one period: However, Levine (2004) noted that “in developed countries, exercise-related activity thermogenesis is negligible or zero. NEAT, even in avid exercisers, is the predominant component of activity thermogenesis” (p. 2). You can find an example here: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2011/08/punctuating-around-quotation-marks.html. See the third example in the second table.
Toggle Commented Sep 24, 2014 on How to Cite Direct Quotations at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Vi. Although none of the examples in the Manual show that, the Manual also does not indicate any restriction. As shown in the example above, the original source can still be clearly cited.
Toggle Commented Sep 22, 2014 on How to Cite Direct Quotations at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Sara. You can include details about the host and guest speaker in the text when you cite it, if those details are important to note. For example: John Stoker observed that "quoted text here" (Sherwood, 2013).
Toggle Commented Sep 12, 2014 on How to Cite a Podcast at APA Style Blog
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Great question! It sounds like that would be essentially a new test, albeit based on an existing tests. In that sense, it's just like any other test. That is, even within the same language, tests are often built on each other this way and evolve over time with adaptations by the same or new authors. If you are trying to cite the adapted version, you'll just create a reference for that test (see also Cite What You See, Cite What You Use). If it is important for your readers to understand the history of the test, you can include any additional information about it in the text.
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Satyagraha, Great question. We recommend using the name as given in the original research - this increases the odds that a later reader will be able to find the work based on your reference. As for how you would format it: That exact example is not in the Manual, so use your best judgment. The Manual does advise, "check with the author for the preferred form or consult the author's previous publication for the commonly used form."
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