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Timothy McAdoo
Washington, DC
Trainer in APA Style and for APA PsycINFO databases. http://www.timothymcadoo.com
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Hi, Rose. Thanks for these comments. You're certainly correct that "considerable space saved and cumbersome repetition avoided" is a judgment call. But, as an example, let's say you used the phrase "self-actualized individual" four times in a paper (twice in the first paragraph, once again on page 20, and a final time on page 30). Introducing an abbreviated version (SAI) and using it that just three times is something you could do, but it doesn't necessarily save space or avoid cumbersome repetition. And, when the readers get to page 20, they may have to go back to page 1 to refresh their memories about what SAI stands for. On the other hand, if your manuscript is about that topic, and "self-actualized individual" appears multiple times per page, throughout all 30 pages, using "SAI" probably helps the reader. Even so, it's a judgment call, and one author/reviewer/editor may make a different call than the next. That's just one example, but I hope it helps. You might also find this post useful: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2009/08/the-flexibility-of-apa-style.html
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Hi, JohnA. Interesting point. Webster's does indicate that it is "short for typographical (error)," but it does not mark the word as slang (as it does for other entries). That said, the example above is meant to show just one possible wording. "Typographical error," "spelling mistake," or other words would be fine.
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by Timothy McAdoo If there’s a typo in a quotation, you use [sic] to show the reader that the error is in the original source and that you’re faithfully quoting it just as it appeared. But, what if there’s a... Continue reading
Posted Jun 15, 2017 at APA Style Blog
Good question. We can't provide specific legal or copyright advice. But, in general, to publish an image (rather than just discussing it), you should include a copyright statement. If you have permission in writing, include the copyright statement with a published photo. Part 4 of our series on copyright has examples. When you don't have the permission, you may not be able to publish the works. See also Part 2 and Part 3 of that series.
Toggle Commented Jun 8, 2017 on There's an Art to It at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Charlotte. Because DOIs are presented as hyperlinks, we have the same recommendations as noted in that post (http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2015/04/should-links-be-live-in-apa-style.html). That is, either way is fine; just consider your audience needs.
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Hi, Loreerojas. Report titles are italicized. You can find example in Section 7.03, beginning on page 205 and at http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2014/02/how-to-cite-an-annual-report-in-apa-style.html
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Good question! Dikert should be before Di Tolino. We alphabetize letter by letter and ignore spaces. See also http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/05/alphabetization-in-apa-style.html An example of this is also at the very bottom of p. 181 in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.
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Hi, Michelle. See the post on bulleted lists: the list should either include full sentences or have punctuation if it is a list within a sentence.
Toggle Commented Apr 20, 2017 on Lists, Part 6: Overview at APA Style Blog
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Good question. If you have two, separate them with a semicolon. And, use the order found on the copyright page. For example, New York, NY: Publisher1; Washington, DC: Publisher2.
Toggle Commented Apr 20, 2017 on The Generic Reference: Where at APA Style Blog
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We would recommend your second case.
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Thanks for writing in. "No date" references precede those by the same author(s) with dates. For more, see http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2013/01/alphabetizing-in-press-and-no-date-references.html (Item 2 on the list).
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You don't need to write "as quoted in" or "as cited in." Something like this would be fine: "Schulte said that "..." (Johnson, 2016, para. 17)." That's because the quote is still from that primary document, not a secondary source.
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Alphabetize by the spelled-out names. So, for your example, Williams, J. [Jennifer]. (2011, April). Williams, J. [Joan]. (2010). This is the case in the example at the end of the blog post, too. "Danny" before "Dylan." I hope that helps! Tim
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Hi, Kate. Good question! If the text continues after the list (i.e., it is the same paragraph), do not indent. Only indent for the next paragraph.
Toggle Commented Mar 30, 2017 on Lists, Part 5: Bulleted Lists at APA Style Blog
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Yes, that works. A list should be treated just like a block quote if it is 40 or more words.
Toggle Commented Mar 30, 2017 on Block Quotations in APA Style at APA Style Blog
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Thanks! This post has examples of the references and the in-text citations: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2016/04/how-to-cite-a-blog-post-in-apa-style.html
Toggle Commented Mar 29, 2017 on Changes Parentheses Bring at APA Style Blog
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by Timothy McAdoo Although the title of a journal article or book chapter is not usually italicized, sometimes words within the title may be italicized. These include book or movie titles, letters or words as linguistic examples, statistics, scientific names... Continue reading
Posted Mar 29, 2017 at APA Style Blog
Books and journals may include DOIs. APA Journals, for example, have print versions, but each article in the print version includes a DOI in the header information, so an interested reader can find (and/or cite) the online version. Government reports typically do not include DOIs, but it's still a possibility (see, e.g., http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/doi_explain.html).
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If you read a printed version of a journal article, it may still include a DOI (typically in the header information; see http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2009/12/how-to-find-a-doi.html and skip to about 2:58 in the video to see an example), in which case you should include it. The same could be true for a book or book chapter, a data set, or other items that can exist both online and in print. If you don't find a DOI to include in your reference, though, it's okay. The information you provide in your reference will likely be enough for an interested reader to search and find it.
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Thanks, Amy. Because the "doi:" format is still an option, we are not recommending any change to the wording. But, thank you for this feedback.
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Hi, Lisa. Good point. Exactly right. The format to use for a DOI in a reference should be one of the three shown in the post (e.g., https://doi.org/10.1016/j.colegn.2015.09.002), without the proxy information. This ensures that anyone clicking the DOI can be taken to the best place for their access to the full text.
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Good question. That is an interesting case. Sometimes there will be an option to view all as one document, even when the default is split over multiple pages. In that case, that would likely be the better version to cite. Because your example is really one source (i.e., one article), even though it is split over the 10 pages, I think you can include just one reference (that would use the URL of page 1). This would be an exception to the general guideline, though, as I don't think most articles are formatted that way. But, let us know if you see other publications doing the same!
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Hi, Megan. I am happy to help, but I double-checked the fourth and fifth editions of the Publication Manual, and test names and acronyms were not italicized (or underlined) in those either. What were the original guidelines you were following?
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Hi, John. Good question. Any links, including DOI links, can be live links (see http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2015/04/should-links-be-live-in-apa-style.html and http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2011/12/should-hyperlinks-be-used-in-apa-style.html for more details).
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by Timothy McAdoo Do you know Crossref? Crossref is an organization “working to make content easy to find, link, cite, and assess” (Crossref, 2016). One of their services is to register digital object identifiers (DOIs), and we follow their guidelines... Continue reading
Posted Mar 1, 2017 at APA Style Blog
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