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Timothy McAdoo
Washington, DC
Trainer in APA Style and for APA PsycINFO databases. http://www.timothymcadoo.com
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Hi, Ruben. Include just the source you used. Let's say your source is Smith (2016): That's the one to include in your reference list. And then your in-text citation will match: "(as cited in Smith, 2016)." You don't need to include a reference to the original source.
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You are right! The APA Style Guide to Electronic References includes an example with last name and initials. When the author of the blog post has provided his or her real name, we recommend including the surname and initials in the reference, just as you would for other authored works.
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See the "How is it done?" section in the post above. Use "as cited in" as shown there. However, we recommend tracking down the original source for quotations if at all possible (see http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2013/01/alligators-and-academia.html).
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Ajlynx, Other e-readers might be a Nook or a Kobo (and probably others). To your question - we have heard other requests to change this as well. We value such feedback and will consider it when revisions are made in the future. Thanks!
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You are right: The Publication Manual originally said "[Web log post]." We changed to "[Blog post]" with the publication of the APA Style Guide to Electronic Referenes in 2012. Either would be acceptable, but we recommend "blog" over "web log."
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Hi, Ajlynx. I'm sorry you did not receive a reply on another post. I was not able to find your question elsewhere. Can you link to that post? To answer your question, we recommend including the type of e-reader for references to e-books. That advice is found in the APA Style Guide to Electronic References and also at http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2011/06/how-do-you-cite-an-e-book.html, "Reference List Entries" section (see the text above and also the text below the first green box).
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Spaces should not be included around dashes. So, for your examples: Khmer rote memory and “choral recitation”—one pedagogy attending to the individual and "What [people] sing is all a piece with their minds and hearts" (p. 340)—another recommended avenue of connection for faith communities.
Toggle Commented Nov 18, 2016 on Computer Editing Tip: Em Dashes at APA Style Blog
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Hi, ann. I see the confusion with that presentation. The same data may appear in a table in the article, which may clarify. If not, you may need to contact the author(s) for clarification.
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Hi, Ajlynx. Your quote and citation look great! In your reference, you should abbreviate the first name to "H." and remove the quotation marks from the article's title (see Example 11 on p. 200 of the Publication Manual).
Toggle Commented Nov 17, 2016 on APA Style for Citing Interviews at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Ajlynx. I agree with your assessment. There's no need to list the individuals that make up the commission.
Toggle Commented Nov 15, 2016 on Group Authors at APA Style Blog
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by Timothy McAdoo In the previous posts in this series (Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3), we discussed the general principles of hyphenation, as describe in much more detail on pages 97–100 of the Publication Manual. General Principle 1... Continue reading
Posted Nov 14, 2016 at APA Style Blog
Hi, Sally, Sorry for the late reply. Yes, treat as a secondary source when this happens. However, you could also just quote Parish and Barness and keep the citations, to clarify. See an example at http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/12/citations-within-quotations.html
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Hi, Anne. Sorry for the late reply. If you are relying on the information in each post, I would create a reference for each one. That is, if you plan to paraphrase or quote from any one of the posts, you should include a reference to that post.
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Hi, naama. Yes, you can format quotations from your interviewees as you suggest: Format 40 or more words as a block quotation. Double-space the entire quote (per p. 171 of the Manual).
Toggle Commented Oct 25, 2016 on APA Style for Citing Interviews at APA Style Blog
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Good points. Both "the present study" and "the current study" are clear and accurate. First person is also fine, so "I" or "We" often clarifies. To use your example, "In this study, we used a psychometrically sound instrument, the ABC Test, to measure stress management."
Toggle Commented Oct 19, 2016 on Use of First Person in APA Style at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Paul. For each, it looks like the author will be "California Department of Education, Assessment and Accountability Division"; the date will be n.d.; the titles will vary based on what you selected. See also http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2011/09/group-authors.html To your second question, yes, the references will indicate the schools. Your advisor may want you to be more general about the methodology (e.g., discussing that you used the California Department of Education but not giving the individual references). But, discuss your options with him or her.
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Hi, Jack. You are correct. When a book has an edition number, it should be included (see 3rd bullet on p. 203 of the Manual). Examples without the edition number (like these http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2011/02/books-and-book-chapters-what-to-cite.html) are showing books that don't have an edition number.
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If a source has six or seven authors, list them all in the reference (but see http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2011/11/the-proper-use-of-et-al-in-apa-style.html for how to cite them). If it has more than seven authors, see http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2009/08/formatting-apa-references-with-more-than-seven-authors.html for examples.
Toggle Commented Oct 11, 2016 on Et al.: When and How? at APA Style Blog
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Good question. The guideline to avoid italics does not apply to direct quotations. That is, if you were quoting from a text that includes italics, you would retain it in your quotation. Quoting the spoken word would be the same because, as you note, you are not able to change the wording.
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Hi, D. If you can't determine the year, use "n.d." for "no date." Do you have an example?
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Good question. There are many ways you could explain a word. Your example looks great. See my comments above to determine whether you would want to italicize the word trichotomized (your choice).
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This post should help: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2012/09/how-to-cite-course-packs.html
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Hi, Griffin. You should cite only the works you've relied on. You can cite the medical journal article(s) you've quoted or paraphrased. If you're trying to cite words from a source you didn't read, you can use the "as cited in" wording shown in the example above (though see the "So when are secondary sources appropriate?" section above).
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If by "long quotes" you mean quotes of 40 or more words, then yes, you could put one block quote following another, but it might not be immediately clear to a reader that the source has changed. The format in your examples also isn't quite right, as the period would come before the parenthesis if this is meant to represent a block quote. It might be more clear to introduce the scholars before the quotations, either individually or both at once. For example, "Alice Smith and Mary Williams are leading scholars in the field X. Smith (2016) noted that ... " followed by the first block quote. See also Example 4 in the PDF available at the end of the post above.
Toggle Commented Aug 29, 2016 on Block Quotations in APA Style at APA Style Blog
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SWL: Good question! You have this right. The only change I would recommend is removing the commas around the word in your first case: In Russian, the word собака /sobaka/ means "dog."
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