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Timothy McAdoo
Washington, DC
Trainer in APA Style and for APA PsycINFO databases. http://www.timothymcadoo.com
Recent Activity
Hi, Susan. Good question! Your first example is correct. We prefer to avoid back-to-back parentheses.
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Hi cmneil. This post has everything you need! http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2014/05/how-to-discuss-the-results-of-an-inventory-or-measure.html
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Good question. The Manual's guidelines are for authors writing manuscripts that they wish to submit to journals for publication. The guidelines are often adapted for other cases (e.g., class papers, dissertations, reports). The use of I or We (in papers with multiple authors) is recommended on p. 69 of the Manual. If your supervisor does not feel this is appropriate for your situation, you may need to make edits.
Toggle Commented Feb 12, 2015 on Use of First Person in APA Style at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Dollo. Yes, that's good. The items are paralle. Using "the" after each letter (e.g., "if they internalize (a) the complaints, (b) the grievances") would be parallel, too, but would be unnecessarily redundant.
Toggle Commented Feb 10, 2015 on Lists, Part 3: Lowercase Letters at APA Style Blog
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Hi, TrudzCR. Great question! Yes, cite it exactly as it originally appeared.
Toggle Commented Feb 9, 2015 on Spelling Success in APA Style at APA Style Blog
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by Timothy McAdoo Note: To learn how to cite individual tweets or posts that include hashtags, see our post on citing social media. This post is about how to talk about the hashtags themselves. The hashtag as an organizational tool... Continue reading
Posted Feb 4, 2015 at APA Style Blog
Hi, Catalina. If the survey was posted to a website, you should be able to use the examples shown in this post: How to Cite Something You Found on a Website in APA Style. The in-text citations follow the usual format: Author (year) or (Author, year).
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I think you're the first person to ask about about Yik Yak! Because individual yaks are not retrievable, but they are dated, you can adapt the personal communication method (see example in the post above). In place of the author name, you can simply describe the user, in terms of your choosing (e.g., "one user said," "an individual wrote," or "One Yak included...").
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Hi, Santhosh. No problem. I'm happy to help! The in-text citation should match the author and date you've created for your reference. That is, "In the Author (year) letter..." or "As you can see in the letter (Author, year), ..." To your second question: Unfortunately, I don't know the details about using EndNote. You may need to contact their customer support for that one.
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Thanks, Santhosh. Following the template shown at How to Cite Something You Found on a Website in APA Style, just fill in the author's name, date, title, and URL. The title of the document can probably be ascertained by looking at the link that directed you to this PDF from the ACLU website. Or, if not, you may have to create a description of the PDF's content, which will go in brackets (see Missing Pieces: How to Write an APA Style Reference Even Without All the Information ).
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Hi, AnKo. See my reply at http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2014/07/how-to-use-the-new-doi-format-in-apa-style.html#comment-6a01157041f4e3970b01bb07e32e81970d
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Hi, AnKo. You can find the reference for that edition of the DSM in this post: How to Cite the DSM in APA Style. Note that the abbreviation is not included in the reference but can be introduced in the in-text citation. Everything you need to now is in that post.
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Santhosh, Is that PDF accessible to others online? This post will probably help: How to Cite Something You Found on a Website in APA Style.
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Hi, Ains. See http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2014/02/how-to-cite-a-psychological-test-in-apa-style.html#comment-6a01157041f4e3970b01bb07e05bc0970d
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Is this a new published version of the scale? If so, you should have the who, when, what, and where information you need, as described above. If you can point to it online, we can help. Or, feel free to send us more details at http://www.apastyle.org/contact.aspx
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Hi, Jessie. Because you have a physical copy and you also doubt the Kindle's pagination, you might decide to cite and reference the physical copy in this case. But, if you had only the Kindle version, you could certainly cite the real page numbers it provides. Keep in mind our related advice: Cite what you see!
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Hi, Lauren, The guidelines in the Manual are for writers submitting manuscripts to scholarly journals. (See also http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/11/dissertation-helpers.html) Dissertations formats vary, and schools usually have their own guidelines and variations on APA Style. Please check with your dissertation advisor and/or consult your institution's guidelines.
Toggle Commented Jan 22, 2015 on Table Tips at APA Style Blog
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It's a little bit like what they say about poetry, right? "You have to understand the rules before you are allowed to break them." In this case, the Manual's guidance on p. 185 (2nd bullet) and Example 7 should be the starting points. When you get to the atypical cases, as you note, the author has to use these guidelines to inform his or her decision on whether and how to vary from the established form. You might also point students to these two older posts: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2014/02/being-apa-stylish.html and http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2009/08/the-flexibility-of-apa-style.html
Toggle Commented Jan 16, 2015 on The Generic Reference: When? at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Toby. Interesting idea, but no, it's not an approach covered by the Manual. Whether you can stray from the official headings guidelines depends on who you are writing for. If your teacher or editor requires APA Style, you'll want to discuss any deviations from the guidelines in the Manual.
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And, more examples can now be found at http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2014/11/how-to-cite-multiple-pages-from-the-same-website.html.
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You raise a good point, and it sounds like you are on the right track. You have to approach the writing with this heading structure in mind. You could attempt to write everything you need in the paragraph under "Session 2: Assessments. But, as you say, there may be cases where the content would make better sense following the subsections. It's difficult to say in the hypothetical, but if the new text would make sense only if it followed the two subsections, I might recommend adding a third subarea, say "Assessment analysis." and including the text under that heading. Or, you might add a new Level 3 heading to discusss the assessments.
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Hi, Louise. No problem! Use the year of the book. You may also find this post helpful: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2013/09/how-to-cite-an-anthology-or-collected-works.html
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Good question. "program handbook" should be in lowercase unless "Program" is part of the official program name, which is unlikely.
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Hi, Rodney. I recently wrote a post about citing software: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2015/01/how-to-cite-software-in-apa-style.html
Toggle Commented Jan 15, 2015 on How to Cite a Mobile App at APA Style Blog
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I see what you mean. Jeff recommended including the month, day, and year because The Lancet is published weekly, and the extra information will likely be helpful to the reader who wants to track down a cited article. Although I see why you might lean toward leaving it out of the reference, note this important line from p. 193 of the Manual: "When in doubt, provide more information rather than less."
Toggle Commented Jan 15, 2015 on The Generic Reference: When? at APA Style Blog
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