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Timothy McAdoo
Washington, DC
Trainer in APA Style and for APA PsycINFO databases. http://www.timothymcadoo.com
Recent Activity
Hi, Tracey. If you're citing just one article, the reference will not include information about the special issue or special section. Only in those rare cases where you are citing the entire issue or entire section will you need the extra information. I hope that helps!
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Again, there's no "right" or "wrong" way here, but your solution seems very clear to me.
Toggle Commented Jul 16, 2014 on Lists, Part 3: Lowercase Letters at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Cricket. There is no "rule," but I would not recommend that. Generally, if you refer to Group A, you will have defined that more clearly in the text. For example "Group A consisted of..."
Toggle Commented Jul 16, 2014 on Lists, Part 3: Lowercase Letters at APA Style Blog
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Thanks, Rebecca. As you note, the Manual shows both examples. Have you asked your professor to look at the case on p. 93? You might also be interested in this post.
Toggle Commented Jul 14, 2014 on Lists, Part 3: Lowercase Letters at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Igor. This is not addressed specifically in the Manual. You might consider using the format shown above, but replacing "Suppl. 2" with the supplement's name. Does the supplement you have in mind have multiple articles? Or is it all written by the same author(s)? If the latter, you might use the format shown in Example 15 on p. 201 of the Manual. We'll be able to provide a better answer if you send us the exact details. You can write us at the contact email found here: http://www.apastyle.org/contact.aspx
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Hi, Ilya. Everything you need to know is answered in this post.
Toggle Commented Jul 14, 2014 on Block Quotations in APA Style at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Rebecca. You are quite correct that the Manual gives both examples. Noting the quantity before the list is not required for APA Style. However, teachers often have their own guidelines that vary from APA Style.
Toggle Commented Jul 14, 2014 on Lists, Part 3: Lowercase Letters at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Kevin. If the original material included double quotes, use them. See Example 1 in this PDF.
Toggle Commented Jul 2, 2014 on Block Quotations in APA Style at APA Style Blog
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In APA Style, lists should be double-spaced. However, sometimes teacher guidelines and/or university guidelines vary from APA Style, so consider discussing with your teacher or advisor.
Toggle Commented Jun 16, 2014 on Lists, Part 5: Bulleted Lists at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Kyle. Good question. No: Even though the test name includes the author's name, you don't have to include a year citation every time.
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Hi, Jorge. We abbreviate as "Suppl." (see p. 180), so the reference would be Vahey, D. C., Aiken, L. H., Sloane, D. M., Clarke, S. P., & Vargas, D. (2004). Nurse burnout and patient satisfaction. Medical Care, 42(Suppl. 2), II57—II66. doi:10.1097/01.mlr.0000109126.50398.5a
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Hi, Brandee. You are exactly right. You can see similar cases in the templates at the top of p. 203 in the Manual.
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Hi, Jim. Good question. If I understand you correctly -- yes, you can change the layout and visual formatting, as long as you don't alter the words used.
Toggle Commented May 27, 2014 on Block Quotations in APA Style at APA Style Blog
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The translated title should appear in brackets []. You can find an example at the top of p. 205 of the Manual (the bullet underneath that example applies to your reference).
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Exactly. Glad to help. ;)
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Hi, Lan. Great question about citing "common knowledge." In your example, you've learned new information from a variety of sources, so you can cite them as your sources (i.e., even though there may be many, many great sources on this topic, you've used specific sources that can be cited. The reader can, if he or she wishes, look at those sources to find or verify information). To your first question, we don't have a rule for how often to include citations. It's important that you clarify where you are paraphrasing, so a reader will not mistake someone's words or ideas for your own. How you do that is up to you, but you can see the examples above and also in When to Include the Year in Citations Appearing More Than Once in a Paragraph .
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Hi, TravettJ. If you are quoting a list, and it is more than 40 words, you can treat it like a block quote. The post Block Quotations in APA Style has examples you can follow.
Toggle Commented May 21, 2014 on Lists, Part 4: Numbered Lists at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Jorge. In APA Style, the English translation of the article title should be provided in brackets. You can find an example in the first green box in this post. Your requirements may be different, depending on your audience or publisher's guidelines. Also, "[Special issue]." should appear after the article title not the issue number. (See the second example in the first green box above.)
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Hi. Yes, keep the citations. This post will help: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/12/citations-within-quotations.html
Toggle Commented May 8, 2014 on How to Cite Direct Quotations at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Michael. Great question. Yes, keep the quotes.
Toggle Commented May 8, 2014 on Block Quotations in APA Style at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Kathy. The reference format to follow depends on the type of publication, not the author. That is, create a reference to your own published work just as you would if someone else was the author. Just as with other works, the document you are referencing should be a retrievable source for the reader. See also http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2011/04/can-you-cite-personal-life-experience.html and http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/10/what-belongs-in-the-reference-list.html
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Good question! Similar examples appear in my post about using brackets. You should be able to follow the general format shown there.
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Hi, jama. Can you provide more detail? If you have the author name(s), the years, the test names, and the URLs where you retrieved them, you have everything you need to follow the first example above.
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Hi, Clint. Your reference should be for the source you read (see Cite What You See, Cite What You Use and How to Cite Something You Found on a Website in APA Style). In the context of your text, however, you should indicate who said the quote. For example: "According to ____, " ... " (Smith, 2014, p. 3)."
Toggle Commented Apr 9, 2014 on How to Cite Direct Quotations at APA Style Blog
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Hi. It's best to follow your instructor's guidelines, as he or she will be grading you! The idea is to ensure that every concept or idea you're paraphrasing is properly attributed. With that said, wen writing a paragraph, you can alternate between citing an author parenthetically and using the author’s name in the running text. The people who replied above have good rewrites of the example paragraph that properly cite the author multiple times without feeling redundant. You might also find this post helpful: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2013/04/when-to-include-the-year-in-citations-appearing-more-than-once-in-a-paragraph.html
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