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Timothy McAdoo
Washington, DC
Trainer in APA Style and for APA PsycINFO databases. http://www.timothymcadoo.com
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Hi, John. That certainly applies! Just follow the guidelines as noted above. That is, include the Stephanus numbers in parentheses.
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by Timothy McAdoo Sometimes one's research relies on a very narrow thread of the World Wide Web. What do I mean? We are sometimes asked how to cite multiple web pages from the same website. “Can’t I just cite the... Continue reading
Posted 3 days ago at APA Style Blog
You are on the right track! The template to follow can be found at http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2009/08/formatting-apa-references-with-more-than-seven-authors.html. To use your example, you would have Hamilton, M. B., Kessler, J., Grant, J., Devor, G., Martin, J., Stoller, A. M., . . . American Psychological Association.
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on Group Authors at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Felipe. Good question. The title of the journal should be shown in the original language. You can find an example at http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2012/12/citing-translated-works-in-apa-style.html.
Toggle Commented 6 days ago on Apples to תפוּחים at APA Style Blog
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Okay, thanks for the clarification. Here's a post that explains what to do when two references have the same author(s) and date: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2011/10/reference-twins.html
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Hi, Donna. In that case, you have different authors? If so, the in-text citations will be distinct. Please feel free to provide the exact examples you have in mind, so we can help you better. Thanks!
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Yes, that's fine.
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Hi, Kim. Great question! You can find the template for that on p. 212 of the Manual: Example 60, "Unpublished raw data from study, untitled work."
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Hi, Jennifer. You may find this page from our site helpful: http://www.apastyle.org/learn/faqs/when-include-retrieval-date.aspx http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2011/09/group-authors.html and http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/11/how-to-cite-something-you-found-on-a-website-in-apa-style.html may be helpful, too. If you still have questions, write us at http://www.apastyle.org/contact.aspx and include the specific page you have in mind. Thanks!
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Pages 39 and 127 indicate that tables should be labeled with the Appendix letter and numbers (e.g., Table A1). All tables and figures within an appendix should be cited within that appendix at least once. In your main text, the appendix should be mentioned, though nothing prevents you from also referring specifically to a particular table.
Toggle Commented Nov 10, 2014 on Table Tips at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Kelly. I replied to your question at http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2013/08/lets-talk-about-research-participants.html
Toggle Commented Nov 4, 2014 on Block Quotations in APA Style at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Kelly. You are on the right track! By using AT - 1, AT - 2, etc., you are “referring to participants by identifiers other than their names,” as suggested in the first bullet in the Strategies for the Discussion of Research Participant Data section above. Because (a) you are not citing a retrievable document (i.e., there is no matching reference in your reference list) and (b) to maintain confidentiality, you also are not using the personal communication method, you can simply refer to the participants by the designations you’ve suggested. Now, exactly how you word that is up to you. For example, any of these (and more) would work: One participant noted that he “was always tired” (Participant AT - 1). One participant (AT - 1) noted that he “was always tired.” Participant AT - 1 noted that he “was always tired.” Participants made many observations. One noted that he “was always tired” (AT - 1). Participants made many observations. One (AT - 1) noted that he “was always tired.” AT - 1 also suggested that “he was more stressed than usual.” I’ll stress that these are only examples; there are many other ways you might word this.
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Good question. It does depend on the wording of the paragraph, but if you include just one citation at the end of the paragraph, you run the risk that the reader won’t know how many of the ideas in the previous sentences you are attributing to the cited author. The Manual does not give rules about how many times citations should appear. The writer’s goal should be to delineate which are his or her original ideas and which are those of other scholars. For more, see pages 15–16 and pages 170–173 of the Manual. You may also find the examples in this post useful: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2013/04/when-to-include-the-year-in-citations-appearing-more-than-once-in-a-paragraph.html.
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Hi, Anna. Yes, those dashes are fine.
Toggle Commented Nov 3, 2014 on Computer Editing Tip: Em Dashes at APA Style Blog
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The following post should help, particularly the "Original or Unattributed Material" section: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2012/09/how-to-cite-course-packs.html
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If you are quoting from the table, you can simply enclose the part you are using in quotation marks and cite as usual (see also How to Cite Part of a Work). However, it sounds like you might be reproducing or adapting the complete table. In that case, you format as a table, make style changes as needed, and then credit the adapted source. Reproducing in this manner may require permission from the copyright holder. You can find more information about that on p. 38 of the Publication Manual. And, you can see examples in Chapter 5 (see, e.g., the table note on p. 142).
Toggle Commented Oct 27, 2014 on Table Tips at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Dana. Generally, colons can be followed by incomplete clauses, as in "Companies: must take into account..." An em dash, rather than a hyphen, can also be used in the same way. However, it sounds like your teacher or editor could have different expectations for the bulleted list. You'll need to ask him or her to really be sure.
Toggle Commented Oct 27, 2014 on Computer Editing Tip: En Dashes at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Lauri. Thanks for bringing that to our attention! The title should not be italicized. We've updated the example above. Another post that your students might find useful has additional examples: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/11/how-to-cite-something-you-found-on-a-website-in-apa-style.html.
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Hi. Good question. You can follow the template of citing a Wikipedia page (see http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2009/10/how-to-cite-wikipedia-in-apa-style.html), because this is a wiki page that is subject to change.
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Hi, Becki. Yes, if your quote has 40 or more words, use the block quotation format. However, ask your teacher or writing instructor about other ways you might approach this. You might find similar lists of symptoms in multiple sources, for example, and then summarize and cite them all.
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You may be able to adapt the examples on pp. 206-207. Note, though, that references should point the reader to a retrievable source document. (see http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/10/what-belongs-in-the-reference-list.html)
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Hi, Satyagraha. 1) Yes, reproduce the title just as the organization presents it. Note "Seventh" in Example 37. 2) Lowercase is correct when not used in the meeting name. Note lowercase "meeting" in Example 36.
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Hi, Trudy-Ann. If the grant was published online, this post will have everything you need to know: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/11/how-to-cite-something-you-found-on-a-website-in-apa-style.html
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The retrieval date is rarely needed. We recommend including it it only if the content of the page may change. This is a general guideline and requires the author to use his or her judgment based on the type of webpage and the source document. The page in that example was a news story. Some news sites update their stories without creating new pages, so this may have been why the date was included. But, the story appears to be gone now, so it is difficult to say. Thank you for bringing this to our attention. These posts will also be useful and include relevant examples: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/01/the-generic-reference-who.html and http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2012/05/missing-pieces.html.
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Hi, Ava. That date (2014) is the copyright date for the entire website, but it does not necessarily indicate that the content on that particular page was published in 2014. Sometimes articles on a large website do include publication dates, and those can be used in the reference.
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