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Timothy McAdoo
Washington, DC
Trainer in APA Style and for APA PsycINFO databases. http://www.timothymcadoo.com
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Hi, Chimene. Is this a map or presentation you created using that site? If so, like other figures you might create and use in a paper, you would include it as a figure (with acknowledgement in the caption if you've used data from other sources).
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Hi, Andrew. Thanks for writing. Per the Manual, quotation marks are used "to set off the title of an article or chapter in a periodical or book when the title is mentioned in text" (p. 91). See also examples on page 200 (Example 9, where the title is used in the citation because there is no author) and page 201 (second bullet under Example 12). This blog post also has examples: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2012/03/how-to-capitalize-and-format-reference-titles-in-apa-style.html.
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Good question. When words are used as linguistic examples, they should be italicized. For example, "He clarified the distinction between farther and further." Thus, in your case, you would have To illustrate this, if the question was "At what time does your shop close?" shopkeepers often started their answer with at as well (e.g. “At five o’clock”). It is not required, but you might consider adding "the word" to be sure this is clear: To illustrate this, if the question was "At what time does your shop close?" shopkeepers often started their answer with the word at as well (e.g. “At five o’clock”).
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Hi, Loes. For instructions to participants, we recommend using quotation marks, so I would recommend using them in this case as well. You can capitalize the first letter. For example, Participant A read the sentence "A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away." Can you provide an example for your last point?
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This post will help: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2013/08/lets-talk-about-research-participants.html
Toggle Commented May 1, 2016 on How to Format an Epigraph at APA Style Blog
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See the section in this post title "Citing the Teacher’s PowerPoint File or Other Materials." If the MOOC materials are accessible to anyone, they can be cited. This should help: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/11/how-to-cite-something-you-found-on-a-website-in-apa-style.html
Toggle Commented Apr 26, 2016 on How to Cite a Class in APA Style at APA Style Blog
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Hi, kcoe. Apologies for the later reply. In case this is still helpful for you or other readers: Yes, you were correct in your understanding. For more detail, see http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2011/10/how-to-determine-whether-a-periodical-is-paginated-by-issue.html. To your last question, no, the pagination style is not related to the rigor in any way.
Toggle Commented Apr 22, 2016 on Table Tips at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Judy. I'm sorry we missed your question. In case this is still helpful, for future reference, put the author name and date first and then include the tables. See examples at http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2013/11/how-to-cite-part-of-a-work.html.
Toggle Commented Apr 22, 2016 on Table Tips at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Todd. If submitting a manuscript for possible publication, yes. However, if this is a class assignment, thesis, or dissertation, consult with your teacher, advisor, or school's dissertation guidelines. Teachers and schools often have precise guidelines for whether that can be done and, if so, where the pagination should be.
Toggle Commented Apr 22, 2016 on Table Tips at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Jennifer. Yes, that looks great. The only thing to change is to make "Ed." "Eds." because there are two editors. That is, Bickley, L. S. (2013). Interviewing and the health history. In L. S. Bickley & P. G. Szilagyi (Eds.), Bates’ guide to physical examination and history taking (11th ed., pp. 55–100). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
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Good question. It does look like the author is "WiGLE." The title will depend on which page you cite. The title for the URL https://wigle.net/stats#geostats, for example, is "Statistics." But, the title for the URL https://wigle.net/stats#androidstats is "WiGLE WiFi Stumbler Handset Stats (Since 10/2010)." So, for those two cases, the references would be WiGLE. (2016). Statistics [Data set]. Retrieved from https://wigle.net/stats#geostats or WiGLE. (2016). WiGLE WiFi Stumbler Handset Stats (Since 10/2010) [Data set]. Retrieved from https://wigle.net/stats#androidstats
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Hi, Cindy. I'm glad you found this post helpful. AP Style recently announced a change from "Internet" to "internet" (see https://twitter.com/apstylebook/status/716279065888563200). But, APA Style continues to recommend uppercase "Internet" as it appears in the APA Dictionary of Psychology and in Webster's. We do value and consider recommendations for changes to future editions. Thank you!
Toggle Commented Apr 20, 2016 on Spelling Success in APA Style at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Marcus. First, thanks! And, yes, you have the order and the formatting correct. The only thing to note is that the S in "APA Style" should be capitalized.
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Denise, If each CDC reference has a date of 2015, you should add suffixes a, b, c, etc., after the year. Thus, the references would be "Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2015a)." "Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2015b)." And, the in-text citation might be "...According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2015a, 2015b)" or "...was found (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2015a, 2015b)." (Note also that the question of whether and how to abbreviate to "CDC" in the citation is covered at http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2011/09/group-authors.html and http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2015/10/an-abbreviations-faq.html#Q3.)
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Hi, Marcus, Thank you. And, great question! The long (original) URL would have also worked here, but the short version is just as good in this case. Because Google created both the long and the short version of the URL, we don't have the same issue as when a third party has created the short version (i.e., the possibility that the short version may stop working at some point). That is, in this case, if Google URLs stop working, that would be just as true for the original as for the short version.
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Hi, Kevin. Good question! Yes, although they often appear at the end of the sentence, citations can appear midsentence, too. You can see a few examples in the first few pages of Sample Paper 1, available here: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2015/09/best-of-the-apa-style-blog-2015-edition.html.
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This post is a follow-up to an earlier post about how to cite a blog post.
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by Timothy McAdoo We’ve covered how to cite an entire blog and how to cite a specific blog post. So, what about when you want to cite a comment on a blog? The elements of the reference are as follows:... Continue reading
Posted Apr 7, 2016 at APA Style Blog
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by Timothy McAdoo Dear APA Style Experts, I’m a computer science major, and my favorite blog is called Gödel’s Lost Letter and P=NP, written by two esteemed computer science experts. Can I cite a post from that blog? I’m also... Continue reading
Posted Apr 5, 2016 at APA Style Blog
Hi, ElizabethC. Cite each separately. See also http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2014/11/how-to-cite-multiple-pages-from-the-same-website.html.
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Hi, Debra. You can create a reference to the journal's homepage or "About" page: see http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2011/09/group-authors.html.
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Hi, Laran. Good points. This is a somewhat older post and doesn't reflect the reference examples in the APA Style Guide to Electronic References. The examples above are still correct, for the cases they show. That is, you want to cite the version that you actually used, because sometimes the context matters. For various reasons, the version of a song releases on a cassette can sometimes vary from the same song on the vinyl release, for example. But, as you note, the examples in this post are not accounting for cases of streaming music. In the template for a single song retrieved from an online source (from the APA Style Guide to Electronic References), the medium of recording still follows the title in brackets [mp3 file] and then the publisher information is replaced with "Retrieved from http://xxxxx"
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You don't have to create a reference for citations within a quotation (see http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/12/citations-within-quotations.html). And, to enclose a quotation within a quotation, use single quotation marks (see http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2011/08/punctuating-around-quotation-marks.html). So, your first solution looks fine, except don't add a space between the single quotation mark and the double and put the period inside the quotation: they call 'half-modern.'" In your last case, you might consider using italics, which is our usual format for talking about linguistic example (see http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2015/04/using-italics-for-technical-or-key-terms.html). This works here because you aren't quoting a particular sentence where the term was used but merely talking about the fact that it is a term: "...what they defined as half modern." I hope that helps!
Toggle Commented Mar 29, 2016 on How to Cite Direct Quotations at APA Style Blog
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Just insert them with all the rest in one list of references.
Toggle Commented Mar 16, 2016 on How to Format an Epigraph at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Edwin. Would the "From" or "Adapted from" examples at http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2016/01/navigating-copyright-part-4.html fit your situation?
Toggle Commented Mar 16, 2016 on There's an Art to It at APA Style Blog
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