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Timothy McAdoo
Washington, DC
Trainer in APA Style and for APA PsycINFO databases. http://www.timothymcadoo.com
Recent Activity
Hi. Good questions. Yes, the guidance about SurveyMonkey still applies. The URL is needed only the first time of a general mention. If later mentions are the same, you don't need to include the URL each time.
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Right. You can see examples at the bottom of the following post: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2013/01/alphabetizing-in-press-and-no-date-references.html
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No, count only the words you are quoting.
Toggle Commented Apr 16, 2018 on Block Quotations in APA Style at APA Style Blog
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Hi, NorKnightSSmith. Chelsea replied in the post about tables, but for other readers wondering: Follow the usual formatting guidelines for quotations (see Block Quotations in APA Style and How to Cite Direct Quotations) when they appear in a table or a figure.
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Sorry for the delay. No, when a DOI is available, we recommend including only the DOI. In that example, though, the DOI is not shown on the page (or the PDF), as far as I could tell. An author would probably use the URL because he or she wouldn't have a way to know that a DOI exists.
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"In 2015, the..." is fine. You can find an example in the paragraph that begins "Alternatively" on page 171 of the Publication Manual.
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Yes, we generally recommend spelling out dates in most cases: April 3, 2013. In a table, you might make an exception to this guideline if you have many dates to compare and/or for space considerations. Just use your judgement on whether the readers will benefit most from the shortened or spelled-out version.
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You can find examples of block quote formatting at the end of http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2013/06/block-quotations-in-apa-style.html.
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In-text citations always match the author(s) and date of the reference. And, when authors and dates match, the letters are appended to the date (see the last green box at http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2013/01/alphabetizing-in-press-and-no-date-references.html).
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Right! If you quote from Corra, Hal, Paolo, and El-Ross, include the citations in that quote.
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Good question. There's no one right answer, but if you put the citation after the last bullet, it may be unclear that the citation refers to the entire list (vs. just the last item). For that reason, I would put it as the lead in.
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That seems fine. Use the same number of decimal places as you did for other percentages in the table. So, <1.0 is correct if your other percentages are 4.5%, for example. If they are all rounded to whole numbers, then <1 would be correct.
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Great question. The Manual doesn't exactly cover that, and I think you could make an argument either way. Just be consistent, of course. However, because I think the intent of the block quote formatting is to make the long text reader friendly, I would count the bracketed text toward the word limit. That is, I would count your example as 41 words and format as a block quote.
Toggle Commented Jan 24, 2018 on Block Quotations in APA Style at APA Style Blog
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When references have the same author (or authors) and the same year, the letters a, b, c, etc., are added to the year. They are alphabetized by title (see also http://on.apa.org/2gPqNOD). Crabtree, S. (2018a, January 22). Global productivity hinges on human capital development [Blog post]. Retrieved from http://news.gallup.com/opinion/gallup/225752/global-productivity-hinges-human-capital-development.aspx Crabtree, S. (2018b, January 22). Untapped human capital is the net great global resource [Blog post]. Retrieved from http://news.gallup.com/opinion/gallup/225725/untapped-human-capital-next-great-global-resource.aspx
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And, apologies for the late replies! Thanks for sticking with us! You can also send us queries at http://www.apastyle.org/contact.aspx.
Toggle Commented Jan 17, 2018 on Alphabetization in APA Style at APA Style Blog
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To your second example: "Buchwald" = "Buchwald" so you move on to comparing the initials. "A." = "A." so you move to the second initial. There, nothing precedes something so the missing second initial precedes the existing second initial "B." Buchwald, A., & Rapp, B. Buchwald, A. B., Rapp, B., & Stone, M. At any rate, as discussed in http://on.apa.org/2kItC5d, if Buchwald is the same author in both cases, you can order as though the "B." were showing: Buchwald, A., & Rapp, B. Buchwald, A. B., Rapp, B., & Stone, M. And if they are different people, you'll need to inclue the initials with the in-text citations, to help the reader know the difference, but also consider adding the first name, to clarify for the reader (see http://on.apa.org/2zcqxmN). I hope this helps!
Toggle Commented Jan 17, 2018 on Alphabetization in APA Style at APA Style Blog
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Good question. Keep in mind that you are first attempting to alphabetize the surnames. That is, the initials need not be considered unless they are needed for disambiguation. So, as a first step, you are comparing "Adams" to "Brown" to "Browning" to "December," which of course would be Adams Brown Browning December (You *could* think of the "nothing" as the end of each name; that is, there is nothing after the "n" in "Brown").) Then, you consider the initials only when you need to, as in the case of Browning, A. R. and Browning, C. B.--having decided that "Browning" = "Browning" you then compare "A." to "C." and order accordingly.
Toggle Commented Jan 17, 2018 on Alphabetization in APA Style at APA Style Blog
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To your first question: Technically, yes that is correct. However, if "Loftus, E." and "Loftus, E. F." were two different authors, you might want to include their first names (and use those to alphabetize) to make this more clear (this is a very rarely needed case; see http://on.apa.org/2zcqxmN). To your second question: in that scenario is "Loftus, E." the same author or a different author from "Loftus, E. F."? If the same, the order would be Loftus, E. F. (2003). Loftus, E., & Ketcham, K. (1994). Loftus, E. F., Miller, D. G., & Burns, H. J. (1978). Loftus, E. F., & Pickrell, J. E. (1995). If different, the order would be determined by the first names (see point above).
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Thanks, Rodney. You are correct--"Robinson, C." comes before "Robinson, V. M." (for more detail, see http://on.apa.org/2jGVdme). Also, when alphabetizing, ignore "The," "A," or "An" at the beginning of a title, so the final result is Robinson, C., & Taylor, C. (2007). Theorizing ... Robinson, V. M. (2007a). The impact of leadership... Robinson, V. M. (2007b). School Leadership... Robinson, V. M., Hohepa, M., & Lloyd, C. (2009). School Leadership... Robinson, V. M., Lloyd, C. A., & Rowe, K. J. (2008). The Impact of Leadership...
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The indentation is the same (1 tab).
Toggle Commented Jan 2, 2018 on Block Quotations in APA Style at APA Style Blog
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Good question. We do not add quotation marks or other formatting to names of theories (see examples at http://on.apa.org/2jCMqo7).
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We recommend using "e.g." when inside parentheses, so (see, e.g., Smith, 1999) is fine. I have seen that in published APA journal articles.
Toggle Commented Dec 19, 2017 on Changes Parentheses Bring at APA Style Blog
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Good question. The name of the blog is not included in the reference.
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Good question! For the reference, we leave out the volume, issue, and page range because, as you note, they are subject to change. You can find an example at http://on.apa.org/2oQTigM. For the in-text citation, treat this as you would other publications without page numbers ("How to Cite Material Without Page Numbers" in the post above).
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Hi. Apologies for the delay. Yes, you have it right.
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