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Timothy McAdoo
Washington, DC
Trainer in APA Style and for APA PsycINFO databases. http://www.timothymcadoo.com
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Thanks. Right, what you are relating is a personal communication. And, if "reason Z" refers to an article, book, or other source, it would make sense to include "as cited in."
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Happy to help. Can you give an example?
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Thanks, Jack. We posted about the new DOI guidelines here: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2017/03/doi-display-guidelines-update-march-2017.html
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Hi, Kathleena, You can find this on page 182 of the Publication Manual (third bullet under "Order of several works by the same first author"): Arrange the works alphabetically by the surnames of the second authors. So, for your example, Volkert, V. M., Piazza, C. C., & Ray-Price, R. (2016). ... Volkert, V. M., & Vaz, P. C. (2010). ... You can find a similar example in this sample APA Style paper (see the "Carstensen" references that begin on p. 17 of that paper).
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Hi, Bill. Exactly right! Research builds upon earlier research. There are multiple approaches you can take to this, depending on how many sources you mean and the particulars of your writing, the topic, and your audience. Generally, one should cite the source or sources you are able to find and read. If you are able to find several that make the same point, you can choose the sources that are most relevant to the point you are making and/or that support the idea most directly or clearly. If you can find a clear originator for the idea, it may be best to quote or paraphrase that source, but some ideas may be too general for that approach to work. Or, if a particular quotation is worth including, you might include (and cite) it, but then also acknowledge that many others have come to the same conclusion by writing something like "... found by many researchers (e.g., Lin, 1999; Tapp, 2010; Zimbardo, 2017)." Or, you might just paraphrase the idea yourself and include several relevant citations.
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ISeetal, Good questions! Named activities (e.g., the Periodic table activity), proper nouns (e.g., she had a doll called the Bobo Doll), and categories (e.g., placed in the category engagement) need not be italicized.
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Hi, wendy. Great question. Yes, you can omit the callout to an endnote.
Toggle Commented Jul 5, 2017 on How to Cite Direct Quotations at APA Style Blog
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Page 172 of the Publication Manual specifies that “Except as noted here and in sections 6.07 and 6.08, the quotation must follow the wording, spelling, and interior punctuation of the original source, even if the source is incorrect.” You can insert words with brackets (see page 173 of the manual for an example). However, the manual recommends doing so when the quotation needs “an addition or explanation” needed to provide your reader with context. We recommend using [sic] to note errors.
Toggle Commented Jul 5, 2017 on You Can Quote Me on This at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Geoff. Good question! "human-service-related position" is correct. Or, if you prefer to avoid the hyphens, you could change to "a position related to human service" or something similar.
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Hi, Rose. Thanks for these comments. You're certainly correct that "considerable space saved and cumbersome repetition avoided" is a judgment call. But, as an example, let's say you used the phrase "self-actualized individual" four times in a paper (twice in the first paragraph, once again on page 20, and a final time on page 30). Introducing an abbreviated version (SAI) and using it that just three times is something you could do, but it doesn't necessarily save space or avoid cumbersome repetition. And, when the readers get to page 20, they may have to go back to page 1 to refresh their memories about what SAI stands for. On the other hand, if your manuscript is about that topic, and "self-actualized individual" appears multiple times per page, throughout all 30 pages, using "SAI" probably helps the reader. Even so, it's a judgment call, and one author/reviewer/editor may make a different call than the next. That's just one example, but I hope it helps. You might also find this post useful: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2009/08/the-flexibility-of-apa-style.html
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Hi, JohnA. Interesting point. Webster's does indicate that it is "short for typographical (error)," but it does not mark the word as slang (as it does for other entries). That said, the example above is meant to show just one possible wording. "Typographical error," "spelling mistake," or other words would be fine.
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by Timothy McAdoo If there’s a typo in a quotation, you use [sic] to show the reader that the error is in the original source and that you’re faithfully quoting it just as it appeared. But, what if there’s a... Continue reading
Posted Jun 15, 2017 at APA Style Blog
Good question. We can't provide specific legal or copyright advice. But, in general, to publish an image (rather than just discussing it), you should include a copyright statement. If you have permission in writing, include the copyright statement with a published photo. Part 4 of our series on copyright has examples. When you don't have the permission, you may not be able to publish the works. See also Part 2 and Part 3 of that series.
Toggle Commented Jun 8, 2017 on There's an Art to It at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Charlotte. Because DOIs are presented as hyperlinks, we have the same recommendations as noted in that post (http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2015/04/should-links-be-live-in-apa-style.html). That is, either way is fine; just consider your audience needs.
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Hi, Loreerojas. Report titles are italicized. You can find example in Section 7.03, beginning on page 205 and at http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2014/02/how-to-cite-an-annual-report-in-apa-style.html
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Good question! Dikert should be before Di Tolino. We alphabetize letter by letter and ignore spaces. See also http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/05/alphabetization-in-apa-style.html An example of this is also at the very bottom of p. 181 in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.
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Hi, Michelle. See the post on bulleted lists: the list should either include full sentences or have punctuation if it is a list within a sentence.
Toggle Commented Apr 20, 2017 on Lists, Part 6: Overview at APA Style Blog
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Good question. If you have two, separate them with a semicolon. And, use the order found on the copyright page. For example, New York, NY: Publisher1; Washington, DC: Publisher2.
Toggle Commented Apr 20, 2017 on The Generic Reference: Where at APA Style Blog
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We would recommend your second case.
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Thanks for writing in. "No date" references precede those by the same author(s) with dates. For more, see http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2013/01/alphabetizing-in-press-and-no-date-references.html (Item 2 on the list).
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You don't need to write "as quoted in" or "as cited in." Something like this would be fine: "Schulte said that "..." (Johnson, 2016, para. 17)." That's because the quote is still from that primary document, not a secondary source.
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Alphabetize by the spelled-out names. So, for your example, Williams, J. [Jennifer]. (2011, April). Williams, J. [Joan]. (2010). This is the case in the example at the end of the blog post, too. "Danny" before "Dylan." I hope that helps! Tim
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Hi, Kate. Good question! If the text continues after the list (i.e., it is the same paragraph), do not indent. Only indent for the next paragraph.
Toggle Commented Mar 30, 2017 on Lists, Part 5: Bulleted Lists at APA Style Blog
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Yes, that works. A list should be treated just like a block quote if it is 40 or more words.
Toggle Commented Mar 30, 2017 on Block Quotations in APA Style at APA Style Blog
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Thanks! This post has examples of the references and the in-text citations: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2016/04/how-to-cite-a-blog-post-in-apa-style.html
Toggle Commented Mar 29, 2017 on Changes Parentheses Bring at APA Style Blog
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