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Timothy McAdoo
Washington, DC
Trainer in APA Style and for APA PsycINFO databases. http://www.timothymcadoo.com
Recent Activity
Hi, Clint. Your reference should be for the source you read (see Cite What You See, Cite What You Use and How to Cite Something You Found on a Website in APA Style). In the context of your text, however, you should indicate who said the quote. For example: "According to ____, " ... " (Smith, 2014, p. 3)."
Toggle Commented Apr 9, 2014 on How to Cite Direct Quotations at APA Style Blog
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Hi. It's best to follow your instructor's guidelines, as he or she will be grading you! The idea is to ensure that every concept or idea you're paraphrasing is properly attributed. With that said, wen writing a paragraph, you can alternate between citing an author parenthetically and using the author’s name in the running text. The people who replied above have good rewrites of the example paragraph that properly cite the author multiple times without feeling redundant. You might also find this post helpful: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2013/04/when-to-include-the-year-in-citations-appearing-more-than-once-in-a-paragraph.html
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Hi, Sarah. You're right: If the version you're using doesn't have edition information, don't include any in the reference.
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by Timothy McAdoo Happy April Fools' Day, everyone! No, sorry, we haven't developed a format for citing a smartwatch. No matter how many we see on your collective wrists in the coming years, we're unlikely to need a new reference... Continue reading
Posted Apr 1, 2014 at APA Style Blog
Hi, Kathy. Thank you, that is a great question. The first two sentences in the second paragraph in the Seriation section (3.04) on p. 63 of the Manual describe two possibilities. Sometimes an author will present a series of numbered paragraphs, as shown on p. 57 of the Manual. The example above matches the second case; see also the example that carries over to p. 64 of the Manual.
Toggle Commented Mar 25, 2014 on Lists, Part 4: Numbered Lists at APA Style Blog
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That's an interesting question. If the data are from two different sources, you'll need to clarify which is which. But how to do that is up to you and depends on what you want to emphasize and your personal preference. Citing each bullet is one approach, though it might be more reader-friendly to separate the data into two lists (one for each source), with one citation at the end of each list. Or, if most of the data are from one source, you might make just one list (with one citation) and then incorporate the remaining points into a sentence (with the appropriate citation) before or after the list. There are likely other ways you might make this distinction as well. Just be sure that the reader can clearly see the proper source for everything you're citing.
Toggle Commented Mar 19, 2014 on Lists, Part 5: Bulleted Lists at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Jule. Thanks for writing. Yes, that's a good use of the em dash. (You can see a similar example in the first sentence of the third paragraph in the post above.)
Toggle Commented Mar 12, 2014 on Computer Editing Tip: Em Dashes at APA Style Blog
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Hi, Dave. Good question! If it's useful to quote a partial or complete sentence to give context to the word, you will need to include the page number. However, if you simply refer to the idea that another author coined or used the word, whether you need to include the page number will depend on what you write. For example, you could write something like the following: Smith (2014) coined the word redshirting to mean ... Note that words used linguistic examples are italicized in APA Style. In that case, you're not quoting any particular phrase or text of the original, so the page number would not be required. Note that you could decide to include the page number for where Smith first defined the word, to give the reader the most information, and that would be okay too.
Toggle Commented Mar 10, 2014 on You Can Quote Me on This at APA Style Blog
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Happy National Grammar Day from the APA Style team! For more, see http://nationalgrammarday.com/ (or #GrammarDay on Twitter)! Continue reading
Posted Mar 4, 2014 at APA Style Blog
Hi again, Mayumi! It's difficult to give an answer to this one without more details about your exact case. Please feel free to send us your example and how you plan to paraphrase: http://www.apastyle.org/contact.aspx
Toggle Commented Feb 21, 2014 on Citations Within Quotations at APA Style Blog
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Hi. Great question. Because you used multiple books, cite each one in separate references.
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by Timothy McAdoo A reference to a psychological test (also called a measure, scale, survey, quiz, or instrument) follows the usual who-when-what-where format. References Here’s an example of a test you might have retrieved directly from a website: Purring, A.... Continue reading
Posted Feb 20, 2014 at APA Style Blog
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by Timothy McAdoo Annual reports are usually easy to find on a company's website. The APA Style Guide to Electronic References says to "format references to technical and research reports and other gray literature as you would a book retrieved... Continue reading
Posted Feb 7, 2014 at APA Style Blog
Hi, Tracey. I know Jeff answered your question by email already, but I thought I would post her reply here, in case other readers were wondering. She wrote, "Covers actually have their own style of page numbers. The front cover is C1, the inside front is C2, the inside back is C3, and the back cover is C4."
Toggle Commented Jan 29, 2014 on How to Cite Direct Quotations at APA Style Blog
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The choice is yours. However, the semicolon would not be correct unless the phrase following it is an independent clause (for more, see http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2013/03/punctuation-junction-commas-and-semicolons.html).
Toggle Commented Jan 29, 2014 on Lists, Part 6: Overview at APA Style Blog
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HariyantoP, Yes, please. Jeff answered your question here.
Toggle Commented Jan 29, 2014 on How to Cite Wikipedia in APA Style at APA Style Blog
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That’s something of a judgment call. Generally speaking, these kinds of documents have group authors (e.g., IBM), but as you note, the individual authors are credited on the first numbered page of the document and again on page 25, under “About the author.” Given that, I would list them as the authors. You might also find this post helpful for creating the reference: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/11/how-to-cite-something-you-found-on-a-website-in-apa-style.html
Toggle Commented Jan 29, 2014 on Group Authors at APA Style Blog
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This post will help: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/11/how-to-cite-something-you-found-on-a-website-in-apa-style.html
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Hi, Cheryl, Good questions. The retrieval date is not needed. You should include "(Producer)" after the name only if you know that he was the producer. ("Host") would be fine if that is as much as you can verify.
Toggle Commented Dec 27, 2013 on How to Cite a Podcast at APA Style Blog
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by Timothy McAdoo Whether you’re a "numbers person" or not, if you’re a psychology student or an early-career psychologist, you may find yourself doing some data mining. Psychologists are increasingly encouraged to provide their data online for other researchers to... Continue reading
Posted Dec 5, 2013 at APA Style Blog
Two group authors should be treated as you would two individuals in the reference (i.e., include both). The group author names should not be shortened in the text citation. However, if they are used repeatedly, you might introduce an abbreviation, as in the example above. You might also find this post helpful: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2009/08/the-flexibility-of-apa-style.html
Toggle Commented Dec 3, 2013 on Group Authors at APA Style Blog
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Because “Midwest Coalition for Human Rights” appears at the top of the title page and again at the top of the first page in the body of the document, I would use that organization as the author in your reference.
Toggle Commented Dec 2, 2013 on Group Authors at APA Style Blog
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Jessbank, You don't need to include the printing information. This is quite common, and the date of your reference is sufficient information for the reader. Your example should be Lindeman, E. (1989). The meaning of adult education. Norman, OK: Harvest House. See also this post about citing the book or the book chapter.
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Great question! See "The Double-Date Problem" section of this post and possibly this post as well.
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