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Timothy McAdoo
Washington, DC
Trainer in APA Style and for APA PsycINFO databases. http://www.timothymcadoo.com
Recent Activity
Thanks! This post has examples of the references and the in-text citations: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2016/04/how-to-cite-a-blog-post-in-apa-style.html
Toggle Commented yesterday on Changes Parentheses Bring at APA Style Blog
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by Timothy McAdoo Although the title of a journal article or book chapter is not usually italicized, sometimes words within the title may be italicized. These include book or movie titles, letters or words as linguistic examples, statistics, scientific names... Continue reading
Posted yesterday at APA Style Blog
Books and journals may include DOIs. APA Journals, for example, have print versions, but each article in the print version includes a DOI in the header information, so an interested reader can find (and/or cite) the online version. Government reports typically do not include DOIs, but it's still a possibility (see, e.g., http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/doi_explain.html).
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If you read a printed version of a journal article, it may still include a DOI (typically in the header information; see http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2009/12/how-to-find-a-doi.html and skip to about 2:58 in the video to see an example), in which case you should include it. The same could be true for a book or book chapter, a data set, or other items that can exist both online and in print. If you don't find a DOI to include in your reference, though, it's okay. The information you provide in your reference will likely be enough for an interested reader to search and find it.
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Thanks, Amy. Because the "doi:" format is still an option, we are not recommending any change to the wording. But, thank you for this feedback.
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Hi, Lisa. Good point. Exactly right. The format to use for a DOI in a reference should be one of the three shown in the post (e.g., https://doi.org/10.1016/j.colegn.2015.09.002), without the proxy information. This ensures that anyone clicking the DOI can be taken to the best place for their access to the full text.
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Good question. That is an interesting case. Sometimes there will be an option to view all as one document, even when the default is split over multiple pages. In that case, that would likely be the better version to cite. Because your example is really one source (i.e., one article), even though it is split over the 10 pages, I think you can include just one reference (that would use the URL of page 1). This would be an exception to the general guideline, though, as I don't think most articles are formatted that way. But, let us know if you see other publications doing the same!
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Hi, Megan. I am happy to help, but I double-checked the fourth and fifth editions of the Publication Manual, and test names and acronyms were not italicized (or underlined) in those either. What were the original guidelines you were following?
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Hi, John. Good question. Any links, including DOI links, can be live links (see http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2015/04/should-links-be-live-in-apa-style.html and http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2011/12/should-hyperlinks-be-used-in-apa-style.html for more details).
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by Timothy McAdoo Do you know Crossref? Crossref is an organization “working to make content easy to find, link, cite, and assess” (Crossref, 2016). One of their services is to register digital object identifiers (DOIs), and we follow their guidelines... Continue reading
Posted Mar 1, 2017 at APA Style Blog
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kstrongstudios, Good questions! That example begins on page 15 and continues on page 16. I will update the post above to reflect that. Thanks! The answer to your second question can be found at http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2014/11/how-to-cite-multiple-pages-from-the-same-website.html
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Damon, The APA Publication Manual does not have guidelines specifically about quoting lists. However, teachers, advisors, editors, etc. sometimes have their own custom guidelines. Your school may have dissertation guidelines, for example, that you can check. Or, consider asking your mentor for help in rewriting this case or in future work.
Toggle Commented Feb 15, 2017 on Lists, Part 5: Bulleted Lists at APA Style Blog
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by Timothy McAdoo When an animal name is part of a journal article title, it is conventional to provide the animal’s scientific name (genus and species). Genus is always capitalized and species is not. Notice that the scientific names are... Continue reading
Posted Feb 15, 2017 at APA Style Blog
Hi, Barry. We use "[Special Issue]" only if citing the entire issue. If citing an individual article, use the usual format: Kelly, B. (2016). A study on the needs of English skills. Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences, 11, 37–54.
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Hi, Djpaglia. You can format a quoted list as you would a block quote. However, to ensure that your readers can tell which items are your own and which you are quoting, you might want to split that into smaller parts. For example: The first guideline is "text text text text" (Smith, n.d., p. 115). My thoughts about this first guideline are ... The second guideline is "text text text text" (Smith, n.d., p. 115). My thoughts about the second guideline are ... That is just one possibility, and there are other ways you can handle this. Just be sure that you're citing your source and that your direct quotes are clearly attributed.
Toggle Commented Feb 14, 2017 on Lists, Part 5: Bulleted Lists at APA Style Blog
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The in-text citations only include years, so it should be (Allan, 2016a) and (Allan, 2016b). If together, that would be (Allan, 2016a, 2016b).
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It depends on the use. If you were to say, "you can see it in the balcony" you would not need to italicize or put in quotes. However, if you refer to the word itself, italicize that first use, as in "the design with a box is called a balcony."
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Good question. We recommend italicizing words when they are used as linguistic examples (see 91 of the Manual).
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Good question. Yes, that's fine. You might also find this helpful: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2013/08/lets-talk-about-research-participants.html
Toggle Commented Feb 7, 2017 on APA Style for Citing Interviews at APA Style Blog
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by Timothy McAdoo With Twitter moments, introduced last year, anyone can collect related tweets in one page. These are easy to cite because Twitter provides all the necessary information—who (Twitter username), when (date), what (title), and where (URL)! Examples Reference:... Continue reading
Posted Jan 26, 2017 at APA Style Blog
Hi. Good question. It is not necessary to do that. For most cases, the URL will give that information as well. And, you may always add additional information with an in-text citation, where you think it necessary. For example, "...," as Terrance (2017) noted on the XYZ blog.
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Hi, Judy. Good question! I think the reference as you have it is fine. The translated version is a new work, as Jeff notes above.
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by Timothy McAdoo Dear APA Style Experts: I know you can create a reference to a YouTube video, but is it possible to cite an entire YouTube channel? Thanks! —Zeynep L. Yes! A reference to a YouTube channel follows the... Continue reading
Posted Dec 19, 2016 at APA Style Blog
Hi, Ruben. Include just the source you used. Let's say your source is Smith (2016): That's the one to include in your reference list. And then your in-text citation will match: "(as cited in Smith, 2016)." You don't need to include a reference to the original source.
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You are right! The APA Style Guide to Electronic References includes an example with last name and initials. When the author of the blog post has provided his or her real name, we recommend including the surname and initials in the reference, just as you would for other authored works.
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