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TomGriffin
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As many people expected, the election campaign has brought rigorous scrutiny of Jeremy Corbyn's past statements on Ireland, as well as those of his shadow chancellor, John McDonnell. Both are London MPs with close links to the Irish community in the city, particularly significant in Corbyn's constituency of Islington North. Continue reading
Posted 19 hours ago at The Green Ribbon
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Antigone (Greek: Ἀντιγόνη) is a tragedy by the Athenian playwright Sophocles, probably composed around 441 BCE. It is therefore the earliest of the so-called 'Theban Plays' in which Sophocles draws on the cycle of myth centred on the story of Oedipus. Continue reading
Posted 3 days ago at Tom's Learning Notes
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Early Greek Philosophy by John Burnet, first published in 1982, is a survey of Presocratic Greek thinkers. Individuals and schools covered include Thales and the Milesians, Heraclitus, Parmenides and the Eleatics, the Pythagoreans, Anaxagoras, Empedocles and Leucippus. Continue reading
Posted 7 days ago at Tom's Learning Notes
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Oedipus at Colonus (Greek: Οἰδίπους ἐπὶ Κολωνῷ, Oidipous epi Kolōnō, Latin: Oedipus Coloneus) is a tragedy by Sophocles, written shortly before his death in 406/405 BCE. It was produced at Athens by his grandson Sophocles the Younger in 401 BC. Continue reading
Posted May 15, 2017 at Tom's Learning Notes
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Oedipus the King (Greek: Οἰδίπους Τύραννος Oidipous Tyrannos, Latin: Oedipus Rex) is a tragedy by Sophocles. Although it is said to have come second in the dramatic competition in Athens at its original production, sometime after 430 BC, it is now widely regarded as Sophocles' masterpiece. Continue reading
Posted May 11, 2017 at Tom's Learning Notes
The Tragic Drama of the Greeks (1896) by the Oxford classicist Arthur Elam Haigh is a comprehensive study of the evolution of the tragic form, covering its origins in the hymns to Dionysus, known as dithyrambs, the activities of the major tragedians of the 5th Century BCE, and later Hellenistic developments at Alexandria and Rome. Continue reading
Posted May 10, 2017 at Tom's Learning Notes
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The Oresteia (Ancient Greek: Ὀρέστεια) is series of plays by Aeschylus which won the dramatic competition in Athens at their original production in 458 BC. Together, the component plays; the Agamemnon, The Libation Bearers, and The Eumenides; constitute the only surviving trilogy from Classical Attic Tragedy. Continue reading
Posted May 7, 2017 at Tom's Learning Notes
The Eumenides sometimes known as The Furies, is the final play of the Oresteia, a sequence by Aeschylus, original produced at Athens in 458 BC, when it won that year's dramatic competition. Along with its precursors, Agamemnon and The Libation Bearers, it forms the only trilogy from classical Attic tragedy to survive in full, although an accompanying satyr-play, the Proteus is lost. Continue reading
Posted May 6, 2017 at Tom's Learning Notes
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The Libation Bearers, or Choephoroi, is the second play in the Oresteia, a sequence by Aeschylus, which won the dramatic competition at Athens in its original production of 458 BC. Together with its precursor Agamemnon, and the succeeding Eumenides, it forms the only surviving trilogy from Attic tragedy. Continue reading
Posted May 6, 2017 at Tom's Learning Notes
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The Agamemnon (Ancient Greek: Ἀγαμέμνων) is a tragedy by Aeschylus, the first play of the Oresteia, a sequence which won the dramatic competition at Athens in its original production of 458 BC. Together with its sequels, The Libation Bearers (Choephoroi) and the Eumenides, it forms the only trilogy from classical Attic drama to survive intact. Continue reading
Posted May 6, 2017 at Tom's Learning Notes
The Suppliant Maidens or The Suppliants (Greek: Ἱκέτιδες, Hiketides; Latin Supplices) is an ancient Greek tragedy by Aeschylus, the first part of a trilogy along with the lost tragedies Aegyptii and Danaides, and the satyr play Amymone. Continue reading
Posted May 5, 2017 at Tom's Learning Notes
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Seven Against Thebes (Greek: Ἑπτὰ ἐπὶ Θήβας, Hepta epi Thēbas; Latin: Septem contra Thebas) is a tragedy by Aeschylus, originally produced in 467 BC as the conclusion of a trilogy including the lost plays Laius and Oedipus. Continue reading
Posted May 3, 2017 at Tom's Learning Notes
Prometheus Bound (Greek: Προμηθεὺς Δεσμώτης, Promētheus Desmōtēs) is an ancient Greek tragedy attributed to Aeschylus. Some modern scholars have suggested it was completed by another hand after Aeschlyus' death in 456 BC due to stylistic differences with his other plays. No record of the play's original production survives. It is the was part of a trilogy with Prometheus Fire-carrier (Prometheus pyrphoros) and Prometheus Unbound (Prometheus lymenos). The order of the three plays is uncertain and the other two survive only in fragments. Continue reading
Posted Apr 29, 2017 at Tom's Learning Notes
The Irish News is this morning reporting that Sinn Féin and the SDLP have held talks at Stormont in the context of a possible electoral pact. This is something that Sinn Féin have canvassed at previous elections. In 2010, SF... Continue reading
Posted Apr 20, 2017 at The Green Ribbon
The Frogs (Greek: Βάτραχοι, Latin: Ranae) is an ancient Greek comedy by Aristophanes first produced in 405 BC. It won first prize at the Lenaea, a festival of the god Dionysus, who features as the play's protagonist. Continue reading
Posted Mar 29, 2017 at Tom's Learning Notes
The Persians (Greek: Πέρσαι, Persai, Latin Persae) by Aeschylus is the oldest surviving Greek tragedy and the only one to deal with recent historical events, portraying the Persian court during Xerxes invasion of Greece, which ended with defeat at Salamis and Plataea in 480 BC. Continue reading
Posted Mar 8, 2017 at Tom's Learning Notes
The Aeneid (Latin: Aeneis) is an epic poem by Virgil written between 29 and 19 BCE, during the early years of Augustus' rule of Rome. Continue reading
Posted Feb 26, 2017 at Tom's Learning Notes
The Works and Days (Greek: Ἔργα καὶ Ἡμέραι, Erga kai Hēmerai) is a poem in 828 hexametres by Hesiod, who may have lived around 700 BC. It is addressed to the poet's brother Perses, urging him to reconcile their quarrel, and invoking a number of myths to illustrate the need to act justly. Continue reading
Posted Feb 13, 2017 at Tom's Learning Notes
Thanks Eduardo, sadly it seems not to be available on the Internet Archive, either. I guess I will have to remove it. I've also made a note of your numbers page, very useful for me!
Toggle Commented Feb 5, 2017 on Languages at Tom's Learning Notes
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The Letters (Latin: Epistulae) of Pliny the Younger (61-c.113 CE) stand alongside those of Cicero as one of the most intimate records left to us by any individual from the ancient world, although the fact that Pliny published them during his lifetime should give us pause about how candid a picture they really present. Continue reading
Posted Jan 28, 2017 at Tom's Learning Notes
The Philippics (Latin: Philippicae) are a series of speeches by Cicero delivered by Cicero in 44-43 BCE attacking Mark Anthony. Their name reflects the fact that they were modelled on speeches of the great Athenian orator Demosthenes against King Philip of Macedon in the 4th Century BCE. Continue reading
Posted Jan 23, 2017 at Tom's Learning Notes
The History of Rome (German: Römische Geschichte) by Theodor Mommsen is one of the most important works of nineteenth century classical scholarship. Continue reading
Posted Jan 19, 2017 at Tom's Learning Notes
The Moralia (Greek: Ἠθικά Ethika) by Plutarch of Chaeronea is a collection of writings by Plutarch, loosely bound by the subject of morals in the sense of mores or customs, and encompassing all of Plutarch's extant works apart from the Parallel Lives. Continue reading
Posted Dec 26, 2016 at Tom's Learning Notes
The Letters to Quintus (Latin: Epistulae ad Quintum Fratrem) is a collection of letters from the Roman writer and statesman Marcus Tullius Cicero to his brother Quintus, written mainly between 59 and 54 BCE. Continue reading
Posted Dec 23, 2016 at Tom's Learning Notes
The Letters to Friends (Latin: Epistulae ad Familiares) is a collection of letters from the Roman writer and statesman Marcus Tullius Cicero to various friends and relations, published by Cicero's secretary Tiro. Continue reading
Posted Dec 23, 2016 at Tom's Learning Notes