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TomGriffin
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The Aeneid (Latin: Aeneis) is an epic poem by Virgil written between 29 and 19 BCE, during the early years of Augustus' rule of Rome. Continue reading
Posted 4 hours ago at Tom's Learning Notes
The Works and Days (Greek: Ἔργα καὶ Ἡμέραι, Erga kai Hēmerai) is a poem in 828 hexametres by Hesiod, who may have lived around 700 BC. It is addressed to the poet's brother Perses, urging him to reconcile their quarrel, and invoking a number of myths to illustrate the need to act justly. Continue reading
Posted Feb 13, 2017 at Tom's Learning Notes
Thanks Eduardo, sadly it seems not to be available on the Internet Archive, either. I guess I will have to remove it. I've also made a note of your numbers page, very useful for me!
Toggle Commented Feb 5, 2017 on Languages at Tom's Learning Notes
1 reply
The Letters (Latin: Epistulae) of Pliny the Younger (61-c.113 CE) stand alongside those of Cicero as one of the most intimate records left to us by any individual from the ancient world, although the fact that Pliny published them during his lifetime should give us pause about how candid a picture they really present. Continue reading
Posted Jan 28, 2017 at Tom's Learning Notes
The Philippics (Latin: Philippicae) are a series of speeches by Cicero delivered by Cicero in 44-43 BCE attacking Mark Anthony. Their name reflects the fact that they were modelled on speeches of the great Athenian orator Demosthenes against King Philip of Macedon in the 4th Century BCE. Continue reading
Posted Jan 23, 2017 at Tom's Learning Notes
The History of Rome (German: Römische Geschichte) by Theodor Mommsen is one of the most important works of nineteenth century classical scholarship. Continue reading
Posted Jan 19, 2017 at Tom's Learning Notes
The Moralia (Greek: Ἠθικά Ethika) by Plutarch of Chaeronea is a collection of writings by Plutarch, loosely bound by the subject of morals in the sense of mores or customs, and encompassing all of Plutarch's extant works apart from the Parallel Lives. Continue reading
Posted Dec 26, 2016 at Tom's Learning Notes
The Letters to Quintus (Latin: Epistulae ad Quintum Fratrem) is a collection of letters from the Roman writer and statesman Marcus Tullius Cicero to his brother Quintus, written mainly between 59 and 54 BCE. Continue reading
Posted Dec 23, 2016 at Tom's Learning Notes
The Letters to Friends (Latin: Epistulae ad Familiares) is a collection of letters from the Roman writer and statesman Marcus Tullius Cicero to various friends and relations, published by Cicero's secretary Tiro. Continue reading
Posted Dec 23, 2016 at Tom's Learning Notes
The Letters to Brutus (Latin: Epistulae ad Brutum) is a collection of letters from the Roman statesman and writer Marcus Tullius Cicero to Marcus Junius Brutus, the assassin of Julius Caesar. Continue reading
Posted Dec 23, 2016 at Tom's Learning Notes
The Letters to Atticus (Latin: Epistulae ad Atticum) is a collection of correspondence between Cicero and his close friend Atticus, covering the period between 68 and 43 BCE. Continue reading
Posted Dec 23, 2016 at Tom's Learning Notes
On Duties or On Obligations (Latin: De Officiis) is Cicero's last work on ethics, addressed to his son Marcus, who was studying philosophy in Athens at the time of its completion in 44 BCE. Continue reading
Posted Dec 23, 2016 at Tom's Learning Notes
The Theogony (Greek: Θεογονία, Theogonía), a poem by Hesiod, is the earliest and most important systematic account of Greek mythology. Continue reading
Posted Dec 20, 2016 at Tom's Learning Notes
On Friendship (Latin: Laelius de Amicitia) is a dialogue by Cicero, which argues that true friendship is founded on virtue. Continue reading
Posted Dec 19, 2016 at Tom's Learning Notes
On Old Age (Latin De Senectute or Cato Maior de Senectute) is a dialogue by Cicero, written about 44 BC, and set a century earlier. Continue reading
Posted Dec 18, 2016 at Tom's Learning Notes
On Fate (Latin: De Fato) is a partly extant work by Cicero, written in 44 BC, in which he discusses fate and freedom of the will with his friend Aulus Hirtius. Continue reading
Posted Dec 17, 2016 at Tom's Learning Notes
On Divination (Latin: De Divinatione) is a dialogue by Cicero published in 44 BC, shortly after the death of Caesar. Continue reading
Posted Dec 17, 2016 at Tom's Learning Notes
On the Nature of the Gods (Latin: De Natura Deorum) is a dialogue by Cicero which examines theology from the point of view of various philosophical schools. Continue reading
Posted Dec 16, 2016 at Tom's Learning Notes
The Isagoge or Introduction by Porphyry is a commentary on Aristotle's Categories, which became a key logical text of the Middle Ages, being translated into Arabic via Syriac, and into Latin by Boethius. Continue reading
Posted Dec 15, 2016 at Tom's Learning Notes
The Tusculan Disputations (Latin: Tusculanae Disputationes or Tusculanae Quaestiones), written in 44BC, is a philosophical treatise in which Cicero defends Stoic views on happiness. Continue reading
Posted Dec 14, 2016 at Tom's Learning Notes
On the Ends of Good and Evil or On Moral Ends (Latin: De finibus bonorum et malorum), composed by Cicero in 45 BC, presents the ethical teachings of the major philosophical schools of the time in the form of dialogues recounted by Cicero to his friend Brutus. Continue reading
Posted Dec 13, 2016 at Tom's Learning Notes
The Natural History (Latin: Naturalis Historia) by Pliny the Elder, was dedicated to the Emperor Titus in 77 CE, and published posthumously, following Pliny's death while observing the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 CE. Continue reading
Posted Dec 11, 2016 at Tom's Learning Notes
The Institutes of Oratory (Latin: Institutio Oratoria) is a treatise by Quintilian on the education of an orator. Continue reading
Posted Dec 9, 2016 at Tom's Learning Notes
Orator, not to be confused with On the Orator, is a treatise by Cicero, setting out the qualities required by the ideal orator, along with a plan for his education. Cicero singles out Demosthenes as the greatest of Greek models, because of his mastery of the plain, the grand and the middle styles. Continue reading
Posted Dec 9, 2016 at Tom's Learning Notes
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The Atlas of Ancient Geography by Dr Samuel Butler was published in 1851, so no doubt it is obsolete for serious academic purposes, but I have yet to find a classical text, or classical scholar, that it couldn't illuminate. Continue reading
Posted Dec 8, 2016 at Tom's Learning Notes