This is TuneCore's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following TuneCore's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
TuneCore
Recent Activity
Hey Chris, Can you send us an email from the email address on your TuneCore account to either support@tunecore.com or @tunecoresupport (our twitter account) so we look into this for you? Thank you
1 reply
@ron We view as our job to work for you and your music. Not only be the be the best in the world at what we do, but also constantly improve the system based on what is occurring in the market. To that end, not only should you have the best most reliable system in the world with the most accurate accounting and fastest live times, but the TuneCore team is your staff, we work for you. To that end we also: - store your music and art - make certain you are getting you money and accounting (and chase up anyone who is not paying - and believe me wer have to for some stores) - do a daily manual ingest of iTunes trending reports to compile and the have them go into each account - review every release going through our system to assure no one else is stealing your songs and/or recording of your song (we have a whole team whose soul job it is is to protect your copyrights) - negotiate with and set the technology and infrastructure up with new stores so you can have your music delivered to them - deal with the stores that are shutting down (it can be messy and we want to make certain you get your money) - re-deliver your songs and music to the stores you are already being distributed to as they change what they need - add new opt ins within TuneCore to accommodate the stores new features - modify/update the art creation tool (we provide free album and full CD art) - modify and update the streaming media players - modify and update the accounting system and display of your info - set up streams and information collection on the streams through the TuneCore media player - answer any questions you have via email or phone and now Twitter - make any changes to your metadata (i.e. album title, song title, artwork etc) - set up requested Artist Ping pages or any new types of things that the stores launch in the future - hire staff and create a system and process to send out weekly marketing and promotion tip sheets in an attempt to get TuneCore artists places and features - reach out to customers with the marketing opportunities and pre-clear songs for inclusion on free download albums - and a lot more for example, we recently closed a deal wit YouTube that will allow you to make money off the advertising if your recording or song is in any YouTube video We now have to build a new arrtist experience to collect and provide the information YouTube would like as well as create a FAQ and educate the artist support staff on all the nuances so we can answer all questions We also have to build tech to tie into their API so we can pull out marketing info and then build a way for that display for you within your TuneCore account Next up I am suspecting will be Apple/iTunes - the rumor mills are out there as to a possible streaming model If this happens, we then need to see what changes will be made to the accounting side - that is, we need an automated way to ingest and display the accounting and if they make any changes to the way they report we need to build or modify existing systems to allow this to happen Then there are the incremental staff hires - for example, the new Executive Vice President Of Brand & Business Development we hired (your can read more on him here - http://www.shorefire.com/index.php?a=pressrelease&o=4990) - his sole purpose at TuneCore is to get our artists deals with brands. Then there are the new technical style guides from the digital stores - some are changing how they want information sent to them which means we need to change the way things are delivered - rebuild what we already built as they changed they way they want to do business. This list goes on but thats the gist. In other words, we are a team that exists solely to work for you - I do understand we have to be a fit for you. I truly hope we can earn that right. jeff
1 reply
@lucy just to make certain you have the correct info We tried to lower prices for the first year and added the new features no more $7.98 extra a month for weekly iTunes trend reports (moving to daily shortly) no more $1.98 per month for additional TuneCore media players (get 25 for free now) no more $1.98 for al-la-carte trend reports no more charges per song or per store when initially distributing your release no additional charge for marketing and promotion Lower prices on pre-buys of 5 and up (discounts of up to 14%) On year two and forward, keep all the new things free, and change the price by a total of $2.50 a month everything else stays the same.
1 reply
@chris our job is to serve you - to that end: - store your music and art, - make certain you are getting you money and accounting (and chase up anyone who is not paying - and believe me wer have to for some stores) - do a daily manual ingest of iTunes trending reports to compile and the have them go into each account, - review every release going through our system to assure no one else is stealing your songs and/or recording of your song (we have a whole team whose soul job it is is to protect your copyrights) - negotiate with and set the technology and infrastructure up with new stores so you can have your music delivered to them - deal with the stores that are shutting down (it can be messy and we want to make certain you get your money - re-deliver your songs and music to the stores you are already being distributed to as they change what they need - add new opt ins within TuneCore to accommodate the stores new features, - modify/update the art creation tool (we provide free album and full CD art) - modify and update the streaming media players - modify and update the accounting system and display of your info - set up streams and information collection on the streams through the TuneCore media player, - answer any questions you have via email or phone and now Twitter - make any changes to your metadata (i.e. album title, song title, artwork etc), - set up requested Artist Ping pages or any new types of things that the stores launch in the future, - hire staff and create a system and process to send out weekly marketing and promotion tip sheets in an attempt to get TuneCore artists places and features, - reach out to customers with the marketing opportunities and pre-clear songs for inclusion on free download albums - and a lot more for example, we recently closed a deal wit YouTube that will allow you to make money off the advertising if your recording or song is any YouTube video We now have to build a new customer experience to collect and provide the information YouTube would like as well as create a FAQ and educate the artist support staff on all the nuances so we can answer all questions We also have to build tech to tie into their API so we can pull out marketing info and then build a way for that display for you within your TuneCore account Next up I am suspecting will be Apple/iTunes - the rumor mills are out there as to a possible streaming model If this happens, we then need to see what changes will be made to the accounting side - that is, we need an automated way to ingest and display the accounting and if they make any changes to the way they report we need to build or modify existing systems to allow this to happen Then there are the incremental staff hires - for example, the new Executive Vice President Of Brand & Business Development we hired (your can read more on him here - http://www.shorefire.com) - his sole purpose at TuneCore is to get our artists deals with brands. Then there are the new technical style guides from the digital stores - some are changing how they want information sent to them which means we need to change the way things are delivered - rebuild what we already built as they changed they way they want to do business. This list can go on and on - but that's the gist.
1 reply
@Metaform I absolutely agree with you. I wanted to assure TuneCore customers know about these changes; we updated our homepage, put the pricing on each release page, put up a blog posting and sent out multiple direct one to one emails to TuneCore customers about the changes. We thought this would be the best way to communicate the upgrades and changes. If you did not notified, we should have done better. Please make sure to contact us directly as its important to us that you have all the information you should. Jeff
1 reply
@ Chancius I hear what you are saying, and I respect it. I am in no way going to tell you that your needs, wants and opinions are wrong, they are yours, and therefore by default they are right. On my side, I just have a fundamental different philosophy - due to technology, I do not think any artist should be denied access to distribution nor do I think they should have to give up any rights or revenue from the sale of their music to get it. I understand that you disagree and believe it better for an artist to pay both an upfront fee, give up a % of what they sell and settle for a lower quality service in return for access to distribution, I just disagree. TuneCore is simply the best in the world at what it does. There is a reason why it is TuneCore customers that: - appear more often in the iTunes charts, - make more money; - sell more music; - get live faster; - get more transparent and accurate accounting - have more ways to get their money more quickly I believe artists deserve the best, we should never ever sacrifice quality. I also believe I should not take rights or any additional money from the sale of the music to be "motivated" to have TuneCore do its job of marketing and promoting artists. And as the market changes, I will build the changes necessary to continue to be the best in the world at what we do. The reason I believe what I do is based on my experiences running my label for about 20 years. I believed in every single of the 230+ releases and I artists I signed and released. I did not think for a second that any of them would not sell. But the reality is, most did not take off, my label had the same hit to miss ratio as all other indie labels. Yes, we released successes like The Pixies, Apples In Stereo, The Dears and Clem Snide, but we also released The Technical Jed, Apollo Sunshine, Kaito, Head Of Femur and many others that, sadly, despite all of our marketing efforts, very few people bought. It's this experience that shaped my philosophy - I believe in what I released. I believed in the bands, I was not banking on failure, I was striving for success. I had the unrealistic expectation that each and every release and artist I worked with and released on my label deserved to be famous and would be. I strived for it and it upset me personally when I could not achieve the goal I set out to achieve for the artist. I started TuneCore based with this deep fundamental philosophy and therefore I do not believe an artist should make decisions based on thinking they will fail. I am also very sensitive to selling snake oil - that is, TuneCore is not going to make anyone a star, only the music can do that. And the truth is as you state, there are many more artists selling less than artists selling more. But still, the idea that you go out and play a gig, sleep on a floor, eat ramen and someone sees you play and buys your music and you have to pay some other company % of the sale just seems so wrong to me. Like you are working for them. Or the same goes when you upload a video to YouTube and it takes off, or work your butt off friending people, or blogging etc. The idea that some third party gets a piece of each and every sale just is wrong to me. I am by no means suggesting TuneCore is not a business, it is. And it does charge a flat fee for a service, but I feel I can look someone in the eye honestly when I do that, not when I take a piece of what they make when their music sells. In the digital world, I just don't believe I have a right to do that. I just think that's wrong. Take the White Stripes as another example, they had a number of back catalog albums out via an indie label before they became international super stars. The idea that some third party company got to make an unlimited amount of money off the sale of the music on the old albums because V2 and the band worked their butts off is just plain wrong to me. So I changed the model, I went flat fee and you get what you pay for with no hooks left in you in the event you succeed. Sell your music not your soul. That's the model I believe in and that's why I started TuneCore. I don't believe in pre-assuming artists are going to fail, and I don't believe when you have success others should be able to claw away as much as they can because you bet wrong. I also dont believe any artist should settle for anything but the best. These are your songs, you deserve the best there is for them. I just will not approach things wishing you success, but not more than x% off the back-end. And I will not sacrifice quality, these are your song, they deserve the best there is. There is a reason TuneCore is the leader in music distribution, and I do understand that from time to time others will invest more in marketing campaigns then improvements to their system, that's just not how we work. jeff price TuneCore
1 reply
check these two links out with the info http://www.tunecore.com/guides/basics_to_know http://www.tunecore.com/guides/sixrights
Toggle Commented Apr 25, 2011 on Tips to Sell More Online: iTunes Tips at TuneCorner
1 reply
Hi Steve There was one person that stole someone else's song and got caught by the songwriter. He made up a bunch of things and posted it on some random blog about a year and half ago You can read about it here http://blog.tunecore.com/2011/02/the-new-music-thieves-stealing-from-artists.html This stuff about the FBI? Not only made up, but just completely weird. jeff
1 reply
No matter how you frame it, in this day and age, no artist should be denied access to distribution and no artist should have to give up their rights or revenue to get it. Silverman's advice is based on selling tickets to the New Music Seminar, not on the reality of the market place - as a simple example he claims music sales by unit are down when they are in fact up He implies artists are not selling music when empirically the data shows the exact opposite He states artists are not making money when empirically there are actually more artists making more money off the sale, stream and play of music now that at any point in history No, not every artist is going to sell a million units, however I take huge exception with people knowingly misrepresenting the truth to sell tickets to a "seminar". Tommy likes to make money, there is nothing wrong with that. My concern is in his quest to do so he delegitimizes and hurts artist - you can read more on that here http://blog.tunecore.com/2010/10/the-state-of-the-music-industry-and-the-delegitimization-of-artists-pt-3-how-a-skewed-perspective-de.html A recent blog response written about your point ran on hypebot - http://www.hypebot.com/hypebot/2011/04/tuncecore-ceo-jeff-price-responds-when-artists-become-the-product.html
1 reply
huh?
Toggle Commented Apr 14, 2011 on Adapting To The New Music Industry at TuneCorner
1 reply
Peter, thank you for the extreme privilege of allowing us to work for you. Never in my life would I have thought I would have had the opportunity to contribute in anyway towards your goals. It is truly an honor! Jeff
1 reply
After going after consumers, retail stores, ISPs and more, Tommy and the RIAA finally ran out of enemies, so they started attacking the artist More on that can be read here in the blog posting " How the Artist Became the Enemy of the Music Industry" - http://blog.tunecore.com/2011/01/how-the-artist-became-the-enemy-of-the-music-industry.html In a nutshell, how in the world does music sitting on Apple's hard drive stop the "good" music from selling.. The idea of "oh no, more artists are making music and therefore its harder to get discovered" makes zero sense. These same musicians existed before the internet, and these same artists created music, the difference now is its available to be discovered, shared, bought and streamed TuneCore Artists the Civil Wars was the #1 album on iTunes for over a week - no label. Was that "clutter" before it was released? Why is it "clutter" after? Is it only not "clutter" if it sells? 98% of what the labels release fail - should we call these artists clutter (I dont think so) Oh, and by the way, music sales by unit are up, not down. Revenue for artists is up, not down. Articles like the one you mention are simply not telling the truth. Don't believe me - check the Nielsen, RIAA and IFPI stats on unit sales - notice they are up every year for the past 15 years, including 2010 (increase of about 1.3% over the previous year)
1 reply
Hey Kathy, Thanks for writing. Someone on the Artist Support team will be getting back to soon, but to give you some info now about what has changed... Now, on the downloadable monthly sales reports,the month for which you are viewing monthly sales are actually the sales for that month. For example, if you see sales for November 2010, this reflects sales that took place in November 2010 (unlike the old system, where November 2010 sales showed in the report for January 2011). So the January 2011 report shows sales from January 2011, and when the February 2011 sales come out soon, they will be posted under February 2011 in your account. Sorry for the confusion! You'll be receiving more details shortly.
Toggle Commented Apr 12, 2011 on Adapting To The New Music Industry at TuneCorner
1 reply
who is the "they" you are referring to?
1 reply
"the cloud" is a type of music service that entities like Google may offer If TuneCore is in deals with these stores then yes, your music would be available in their cloud based service
1 reply
no you do not, the PROs exchange money between them
1 reply
You are factually incorrect. TuneCore was the first entity to provide distribution to any artist with no gatekeeper while allowing the artist to keep all their rights and receive 100% of the money from the sale of the music via non-exclusive agreement It changed and democratized an industry and I am damn proud of it. I encourage and support you creating you own service to better the world as opposed to posting bitter comments on blogs. (From what I can tell you simply post on blogs and nothing more.) In regards to "checking" - with all due respect, give me a break. You do seem to have an agenda, and I clearly don't know what it is, but you personal dislike of me clouds your judgement. Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but you don't get to change facts. I did want to give you a heads up that if you future blog postings continue to mis-state fact etc, we will delete them. Opinions are always welcome I do wish you success in your music career.
1 reply
curt this is an awesome flow chart - thank you for doing this. May we republish it at some point?
1 reply
As I said, there is a lot of anger out there - it really does confuse me. I am not certain of the cause but do hope that energy can be redirected towards helping their own careers as opposed to suggesting people hang themselves. In the meantime, for those that want it, the help, opportunities and information are there.
1 reply
@Cyrusjohnsmith When you have time, please troll through the blog, the site and/or download the new PDFs also, please feel free to checkout press releases - http://www.shorefire.com/clients/tunecore/
1 reply
@Cyrusjohnsmith With all due respect, this conversation should be about artists, not me. Your personal like or dislike of me has no place here. TuneCore will continue to do what it set out to do - fight for artists, provide them information, access and education. Create opportunities to pursue their goals under their own terms. And we wont do that by simply writing some comments on a blog...
1 reply
You know, I read things posted like the comment by Cyrusjohnsmith and I have to admit, I just do not understand where the anger comes from. And its not just this one person, there are a number of people out there in the world that have an inherent anger towards just about everything in the music industry, no matter what it may be. The attack it all, including the musicians. So be it, but honestly, I do wish I could figure it out. On a different note, everyone is entitled to their opinion, but they dont get to make up facts. TuneCore charges a flat rate for unlimited songs to unlimited stores. There is no incremental charge for stores - that was removed around two years ago. Actually, last week, we also added up to 25 streaming media players per account with distribution. And yes, we actually did reinvent the music industry - on January 26th, 2006 the music industry changed. For the first time in its history any artist had access to distribution, there was no more gatekeeper deciding who get let in. In addition, artists kept all their rights and received 100% of the money from the sale of their music via a non-exclusive agreement they could cancel at any time. With this final piece of the puzzle in place, the industry was democratized, all were welcome. In the last 2 1/2 years, TuneCore Artists sold over 300 million songs generating over $130 million in gross music sales and another $100 million or so in publishing income. It is the artists and the music fans that changed the world, they music just had to be let in. jeff
1 reply
Hey - we posted a PDF version (link above the current results) that should be a little easier to read. Sorry about that!
Toggle Commented Mar 4, 2011 on Music Survey Results at TuneCorner
1 reply
It's true, Rob, these are serious problems. But my impulse, always, is to fight fire with education. That is, let this be yet another example of why it's vital we help our clients (and the world) understand their rights, responsibilities and opportunities. Ounce of prevention... --Peter
1 reply
Ignorance is the real problem in this industry--has been for more than a century. People need not only to know how the business works, but their rights, how to use them, and their responsibilities, too. You're absolutely right. --Peter
1 reply