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urthshu
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"While your readers know the difference, I fear a lot of people will start to look at all black churches as hotbeds of leftist fury and hatred of "blue-eyed devils." oh, don't be fearing that at all. its pretty much a fact right now. let me clue you in: a lot of whites honestly subscribe to the idea of wiping out racism. we believed you. simple as that. and now we see this stuff. whatever man. i'm beyond disgusted. and this: "Clinton can't win on her message so she chooses the old dirty politics path." this is bs. obama chose the church, its an issue, he owns it. there's a point where folks have got to stop blaming someone else for what they've got themselves into and the time is now.
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That sounds like a Christian-biased reading of Judaism before the diaspora. I'd have to agree, at least judging from what I'd been referring to, but wholly understandable nonetheless. When the second Temple fell, the past [for the 'Jewish-Christians'] was simply no more. In consequence, ours became an entirely forwards-looking faith. In the 'Christian-biased reading' above, this unconscious amnesia is still present: Maybe its a good thing, maybe God's will. Fact is, we don't know and cannot access any other way of looking at it. We do know, however, that these early Christians didn't survive the fall of the Temple and their works were destroyed. We're all the poorer for that. Thats what is sad. Instead of a mutually-respectful continuity growing amidst a shared religious culture, we broke apart, sometimes meeting as friends but too often as enemies.
Toggle Commented Aug 14, 2005 on Temple Mount blogburst at ShrinkWrapped
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I've been reading these articles, including yours, and been very impressed by them. I'm learning a lot. One 'lamentation' is conspicuous by its absence, although I can entirely understand why. I'm a Christian and our NT came about during the destruction of the 2nd Temple. That, in itself, is not a cause for sadness. What is, however, is this: When the Temple was destroyed, that severed the link for the so-called 'Jewish-Christians', exemplified by the party of James, who saw the message of Christ as the call of Torah for all nations and not as a new religion, as Paul promoted it. The lament, then, is for a lost tradition among the Christians, and one that is one of history's & humanity's great losses, the beginning of our estrangement. This, naturally, is something that would be controversial for Jews to mourn, but Christians ought to remember.
Toggle Commented Aug 14, 2005 on Temple Mount blogburst at ShrinkWrapped
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Good post, and one I'll come back to, to think over more. For the first part re:university PC domination, however, a tangential, disquieting observation: These reactions and the way they subvert free inquiry or - more importantly - the expression of that free inquiry...we've seen these before, other times, other places. Germany's archeological expeditions to prove Aryan origins and supremacy was of this species. The outrageous claims of Islamic professors ['Adam was 12 feet tall', 'monkeys stone adulterous females', etc.] It isn't that spurious claims are made. That happens all the time. The problem is the claims cannot be challenged.
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FWIW, I think Papes [&/or Armed Liberal] is incorrect in stating the root cause is strategic. AQ does not have a political agenda with an acceptable solution. There is no independence to be granted, no state to form, no action that will satisfy their ultimate goals other than adoption of their entire culture. Any "policy solutions" are stop gap measures - just time for them to gather strength as far as they are concerned. It would be more apropriate to say that it starts with being or becoming a revolutionary. Terrorism is a tactic in a war, used by the weak against the strong. Revolutionaries, said most simply and best by Sergei Nechayev in "Catechism of a Revolutionary" are "doomed men." They care only for their cause. People, equipment, relationships, money, are nothing more than means to and end. The mistake that people make in the issue of AQ and associated groups is that they impart a political (ie policy) cause and solution where none exists. This is reasonable. It is rational. It is entirely within the western realm of experience and tradition. And I do think that a peculiar cult aspect to their religious beliefs plays a significant role in turning out suicide bombers. I was struck by the interrogation techniques used in Gitmo, not because of any comparisons to 'torture', but because they were so very close to a compressed form of deprogramming therapy. And I was astounded by the outcry, thinking "Torture? These were men for whom suicide was venerated. What possible harm could this cause?" One needs to compare the baseline state versus 'sucessfully treated' inmates, I would guess. From a purely clinical aspect, they'd need to take away their Korans, of course, but that will never be done.
Toggle Commented Jul 16, 2005 on Blind Spots at ShrinkWrapped
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