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vinelander
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Oh, please could you keep a portion for those shiny new chapbooks/pins combo for us poor folks who reside outside the US? I'll trade you shiny gold rock for em'!! That would be great. Ta. Thanks.
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I am not sure if it is accurate, but I am sure I could attribute it to the blue pants wearing, animated character, also known as Homer Simpson who said: "Safety dance, Safety Dance Everybody take off your pants" Good times. Best. Misheard lyric. EVER.
Toggle Commented Mar 13, 2009 on From the Vault: the safety dance at WWdN: In Exile
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There's a part of me that would like to geek-out more often. Reading the way you describe it, I can almost small the combination of pencil shavings and rubber eraser - two important tools in dungeon mapping. D&D for me is sitting in a friends' parents small apartment on the floor just after math tutoring (sidebar: my dad traded music lessons with my friends' mom for math tutoring for me - they turned out to be well respected musicians. Me, I'm a drummer - the only thing I can count on is drool! *da Dum!*) D&D rocked every Saturday afternoon as we crawled through dungeons, blasted kobolds with magic missile and tried valiantly to hack n slash with a rusty 1d6 short sword. I think you've inspired a lot of us to roll for initiative one more time. Thanks.
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I've had a couple of good experiences playing Munchkin. The first was when I was first introduced to the game. The group were all so Munchkinly that it was a riot. Well, that and the fact that we had the +1 Elixir of Goodness (read: Guinness) at our elbows didn't hurt either. It was at this table that I was schooled in Munchin play and was forever wearing Duck of Doom. The second experience was when I taught my wife and a hand-full of friends how to play. In a room full of newbies I was the master - (not really - but let's keep the fantasy going, ok?) It was there that timid play opened up in to much Munchkinnery. Friends who are so well reserved in their daily lives became the most Munchkinly of all. Munchkins is, as you rightly said Wil, a game designed for fun. Winning isn't everything...messing with your friends and family...priceless.
Toggle Commented Dec 23, 2008 on in which munchkin is played at WWdN: In Exile
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I've had a couple of good experiences playing Munchkin. The first was when I was first introduced to the game. The group were all so Munchkinly that it was a riot. Well, that and the fact that we had the +1 Elixir of Goodness (read: Guinness) at our elbows didn't hurt either. It was at this table that I was schooled in Munchin play and was forever wearing Duck of Doom. The second experience was when I taught my wife and a hand-full of friends how to play. In a room full of newbies I was the master - (not really - but let's keep the fantasy going, ok?) It was there that timid play opened up in to much Munchkinnery. Friends who are so well reserved in their daily lives became the most Munchkinly of all. Munchkins is, as you rightly said Wil, a game designed for fun. Winning isn't everything...messing with your friends and family...priceless.
Toggle Commented Dec 23, 2008 on in which munchkin is played at WWdN: In Exile
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Great to hear Wil. Now the question remains - will you be shipping to Canuckistan?
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Great to hear Wil. Now the question remains - will you be shipping to Canuckistan?
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John’s Naish’s Enough: Breaking Free from the world of More - a compelling read to take stock of excess in your life. I didn’t drink the cool-aid but it is a fascinating concept. Finished whole Ender Series of books over the summer- all of them good. Devil May Care by Sebastian Falks - a “new” James Bond novel – not as barbaric as Ian Fleming’s creation form the 1950’s but still, a good read.
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John’s Naish’s Enough: Breaking Free from the world of More - a compelling read to take stock of excess in your life. I didn’t drink the cool-aid but it is a fascinating concept. Finished whole Ender Series of books over the summer- all of them good. Devil May Care by Sebastian Falks - a “new” James Bond novel – not as barbaric as Ian Fleming’s creation form the 1950’s but still, a good read.
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Dr.Terrible is brillaint. It felt like I had heard the music before and then, checking the credits it all came together; once I saw that Joss Wheadon directed - it all made sense. Not since the famous Buffy the Vampire Slayer episode - Once Again with Feeling: A Buffy Musical has there been a brilliant blend of comedy, action and great musical numbers. This stuff is great, thanks for sharing.
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Dr.Terrible is brillaint. It felt like I had heard the music before and then, checking the credits it all came together; once I saw that Joss Wheadon directed - it all made sense. Not since the famous Buffy the Vampire Slayer episode - Once Again with Feeling: A Buffy Musical has there been a brilliant blend of comedy, action and great musical numbers. This stuff is great, thanks for sharing.
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Switching gears is difficult. As a columnist for a small but independent newspaper, there are days that pass without as much as a word on the page. Nothing works. Doing management activities in an office setting by day and then winding down to write at night - on food and wine – sounds like a dream job for many, but at times it is as if I am lifting the weight of Atlas. As hard as it sounds, creativity sometimes is forced. That’s the world of a writer. The creative process sometimes gets sacrificed for results and that’s sometimes difficult to take. I would love to have more column inches to write - to round out my exposition but I am cramped in 750 lonely words with which to squeeze each and every last drop of writing flavour. I’ve written for a collective. It is hard work. Sure it pays the bills but it can be stifling as a creative. My advice, such as it is - stick to what you love. If I could get paid enough to write full time - I’d do it in a heart beat, but you are in an enviable position - you are well known, apparently well liked and as it seems respected by your peers - writers aspire to this. Stick to writing the things that you love to write – and eventually you’ll get what you need. “Do good work and good work comes to you” - write short stories – that’s your good work. Nicholas Gardner
Toggle Commented Jul 16, 2008 on changing gears for criminal minds at WWdN: In Exile
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Switching gears is difficult. As a columnist for a small but independent newspaper, there are days that pass without as much as a word on the page. Nothing works. Doing management activities in an office setting by day and then winding down to write at night - on food and wine – sounds like a dream job for many, but at times it is as if I am lifting the weight of Atlas. As hard as it sounds, creativity sometimes is forced. That’s the world of a writer. The creative process sometimes gets sacrificed for results and that’s sometimes difficult to take. I would love to have more column inches to write - to round out my exposition but I am cramped in 750 lonely words with which to squeeze each and every last drop of writing flavour. I’ve written for a collective. It is hard work. Sure it pays the bills but it can be stifling as a creative. My advice, such as it is - stick to what you love. If I could get paid enough to write full time - I’d do it in a heart beat, but you are in an enviable position - you are well known, apparently well liked and as it seems respected by your peers - writers aspire to this. Stick to writing the things that you love to write – and eventually you’ll get what you need. “Do good work and good work comes to you” - write short stories – that’s your good work. Nicholas Gardner
Toggle Commented Jul 16, 2008 on changing gears for criminal minds at WWdN: In Exile
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Concert going isn’t like it used to be. When I was in University and part of the University Press Corps one of the biggest perks was getting the Entertainment beat for a weekend gig. I mean It was always two tickets one for the reporter and one for the photographer - but who says we couldn’t double duty? So I ended up with tickets all the time for two - which meant I could bring a date. Good times. Long story short - there was a time when concert going was for the music, not for the show. I miss that. I saw the Pixies in Toronto during their reunion tour. The crowd, mainly idiots were rude and stupid. I went with my wife who is small and spent the whole time trying to protect her from the surge of the crowd and the inconsiderates who would crash into you because they were high/drunk/stupid. Good show - crappy audience. They were mostly there to get high/drunk/stupid and not there because the music meant anything to them other than a reason to get high/drunk/stupid. Rule from this: Be like my best buddy. He has concerts coming out of his ears on DVD and that’s where he’ll stay. I mean he missed Bob Dylan recently here in town and he is a huge fan because he couldn’t deal with the “bullshit quotient” of concert going. Sad but true.
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Concert going isn’t like it used to be. When I was in University and part of the University Press Corps one of the biggest perks was getting the Entertainment beat for a weekend gig. I mean It was always two tickets one for the reporter and one for the photographer - but who says we couldn’t double duty? So I ended up with tickets all the time for two - which meant I could bring a date. Good times. Long story short - there was a time when concert going was for the music, not for the show. I miss that. I saw the Pixies in Toronto during their reunion tour. The crowd, mainly idiots were rude and stupid. I went with my wife who is small and spent the whole time trying to protect her from the surge of the crowd and the inconsiderates who would crash into you because they were high/drunk/stupid. Good show - crappy audience. They were mostly there to get high/drunk/stupid and not there because the music meant anything to them other than a reason to get high/drunk/stupid. Rule from this: Be like my best buddy. He has concerts coming out of his ears on DVD and that’s where he’ll stay. I mean he missed Bob Dylan recently here in town and he is a huge fan because he couldn’t deal with the “bullshit quotient” of concert going. Sad but true.
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Thanks for reminding us how far Dr. Gonzo pushed the literary as well as the fabric of pop culture. As a bit of a Thomson buff - I have to say well played. He will be missed. Beware...this is bat country.
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Thanks for reminding us how far Dr. Gonzo pushed the literary as well as the fabric of pop culture. As a bit of a Thomson buff - I have to say well played. He will be missed. Beware...this is bat country.
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There is a big difference between being popular and being recognized. So called A-listers (read: bankable on screen stars) as so called because they are sold to the public as such by faceless studio execs in order to legitimize the budget (read: fees) they have to pay in order to secure said A-Lister. A recognizable star is what a GQ writer said some years ago about Phillip Seymour Hoffman. The writer called hin the "hardest working MOE in the business". A MOE is an actor who makes "the most of the moment". Keith David is the video game MOE. I'll place a bet of shiny gold rocks that gamers could instantly recognize Kieth David's voice. They might not know his name but they sure know the character(s) he voices. David's voice credits are the biggest character names in video games - he *is* an A-Lister. People spend a couple of hours with a character on the big screen, but sometimes *hundreds* of hours with them in video games. Voice acting is a very legitimate art-form and as you rightly said, not everyone can do it, and very few A-listers can make the transition (only Morgan Freeman springs to mind, and his voice is lent mostly as a narrator, not a character) between the two worlds. I think voice actors are underrated and undervalued in a world where celebrity is measured in tabloid column inches. I think voice actors have to be better in their craft, because they have to be a storyteller in the oral tradition. I think you, Wil, are one of those few who can do it. Cheers.
Toggle Commented Feb 5, 2008 on regarding voice acting . . . at WWdN: In Exile
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There is a big difference between being popular and being recognized. So called A-listers (read: bankable on screen stars) as so called because they are sold to the public as such by faceless studio execs in order to legitimize the budget (read: fees) they have to pay in order to secure said A-Lister. A recognizable star is what a GQ writer said some years ago about Phillip Seymour Hoffman. The writer called hin the "hardest working MOE in the business". A MOE is an actor who makes "the most of the moment". Keith David is the video game MOE. I'll place a bet of shiny gold rocks that gamers could instantly recognize Kieth David's voice. They might not know his name but they sure know the character(s) he voices. David's voice credits are the biggest character names in video games - he *is* an A-Lister. People spend a couple of hours with a character on the big screen, but sometimes *hundreds* of hours with them in video games. Voice acting is a very legitimate art-form and as you rightly said, not everyone can do it, and very few A-listers can make the transition (only Morgan Freeman springs to mind, and his voice is lent mostly as a narrator, not a character) between the two worlds. I think voice actors are underrated and undervalued in a world where celebrity is measured in tabloid column inches. I think voice actors have to be better in their craft, because they have to be a storyteller in the oral tradition. I think you, Wil, are one of those few who can do it. Cheers.
Toggle Commented Feb 5, 2008 on regarding voice acting . . . at WWdN: In Exile
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Wheaton I hate you. ..I think I've just gone and soiled my armor.
Toggle Commented Dec 3, 2007 on i am from space and the future at WWdN: In Exile
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Wheaton I hate you. ..I think I've just gone and soiled my armor.
Toggle Commented Dec 3, 2007 on i am from space and the future at WWdN: In Exile
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Wil, Have to say it was a fine read. Kitchen conversations are always the best - especially when in the middle of making food. I have a lot of fond memories of dice - I have them in the aforementioned CR sack. They are a mixture of dice from my Basic D&D set- long before AD&D, as well as a good collection of “lucky dice”. I even have a d100 (percentile) and a strange d30 - which oddly is orange… My only real memory of good old fashioned luck was when as a Senior (Grade 12 to all you Canadians who read), our province had a Scholarship Exam which gave you the chance for some good entrance money to University. Every one knew it was a crap shoot “all the smart kids would get the scholarships anyway” so we weren't all that bothered to really try hard. So a bunch of us wrote the multiple choice exams with a d4 and a wax crayon in hand – mine was purple. None of us got a dime from the government. I wonder why? ;) Great story - write more of them...more often. I like the way you roll.
Toggle Commented Nov 6, 2007 on that's just how i roll at WWdN: In Exile
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Wil, Have to say it was a fine read. Kitchen conversations are always the best - especially when in the middle of making food. I have a lot of fond memories of dice - I have them in the aforementioned CR sack. They are a mixture of dice from my Basic D&D set- long before AD&D, as well as a good collection of “lucky dice”. I even have a d100 (percentile) and a strange d30 - which oddly is orange… My only real memory of good old fashioned luck was when as a Senior (Grade 12 to all you Canadians who read), our province had a Scholarship Exam which gave you the chance for some good entrance money to University. Every one knew it was a crap shoot “all the smart kids would get the scholarships anyway” so we weren't all that bothered to really try hard. So a bunch of us wrote the multiple choice exams with a d4 and a wax crayon in hand – mine was purple. None of us got a dime from the government. I wonder why? ;) Great story - write more of them...more often. I like the way you roll.
Toggle Commented Nov 6, 2007 on that's just how i roll at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
Where I live, the arcades have all gone - and it is sad really. They were great places to dispose of a pocket-full of quarters. I wasn't a Pac Man/DK fan - they weren't for me. I loved the side scrollers - Double Dragon, Contra - even Gauntlet (except when Death started to chase you in the upper levels). I just bought a new XB 360 - it comes complete with Guitar Hero II, so I will be able to appreciate your hard work trying to beat your kids on Expert. It won't beat the smell nor the noise of a good quality Arcade - but with surround sound - I can at least give it a good old try. I'm very jealous there's a vintage arcade for you so near by - so many memories...good times. Good times.
Toggle Commented Oct 22, 2007 on drink beer, insert coin at WWdN: In Exile
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Where I live, the arcades have all gone - and it is sad really. They were great places to dispose of a pocket-full of quarters. I wasn't a Pac Man/DK fan - they weren't for me. I loved the side scrollers - Double Dragon, Contra - even Gauntlet (except when Death started to chase you in the upper levels). I just bought a new XB 360 - it comes complete with Guitar Hero II, so I will be able to appreciate your hard work trying to beat your kids on Expert. It won't beat the smell nor the noise of a good quality Arcade - but with surround sound - I can at least give it a good old try. I'm very jealous there's a vintage arcade for you so near by - so many memories...good times. Good times.
Toggle Commented Oct 22, 2007 on drink beer, insert coin at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply