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My name is Callie Neylan. I am a designer, writer, photographer + educator. I work as a senior designer in the user experience group at NPR. I am also adjunct faculty in the design division at MICA (Maryland Institute College of Art), ranked among the top art and design schools in the country.
Interests: travel, wine, running, design, indie films, weimaraners, hiking, reading, technology, blogging, politics, rollerblading, skiing, architecture, rock climbing, foreign languages, singing and photography.
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Callie Neylan is now following The Typepad Team
Mar 15, 2010
We did exactly what you're suggesting, holding the button down for several seconds, on more than one try. The stewardess had her own Blackberry and knew how they worked. This one would not turn off, for whatever reason. Very bad UX.
Toggle Commented Mar 3, 2010 on How bad design turned my plane around. at 1934
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It was. That damn Blackberry would not turn off. Talk about a bad user experience. And not just for the phone user, either. For the 100+ other people on the plane, too.
Toggle Commented Mar 1, 2010 on How bad design turned my plane around. at 1934
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Thanks for posting to my blog! I'm looking forward to reading your book. I just got back from an interaction design conference in Savannah where one speaker talked a lot about responsive architecture. Fascinating stuff.
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Tom, you should order the espresso blend beans - http://www.deandeluca.com/coffee-tea-cocoa/coffee-by-type/blends/dean-and-deluca-espresso.aspx - from Dean & Deluca if you're looking for new beans. And I've had good luck with my Breville machine, which wasn't that expensive, considering how much a La Marzocco home machine would cost.
Toggle Commented Dec 26, 2009 on Espresso, typography, and the Four Ms. at 1934
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Thanks! I had fun writing it....
Toggle Commented Dec 23, 2009 on Espresso, typography, and the Four Ms. at 1934
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Oh, hi. Yes, I haven't set that up yet. Feel free to email me questions here: neylano at me dot com.
Toggle Commented Nov 8, 2009 on Cinema lust. at 1934
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Hey, thanks! Not very active on FB anymore, but you should be able to find me on LinkedIn. I'm switching internet hosting which is why my portfolio site is down. Things are good here, although I still miss the west coast. How's New York? I would live there in a heartbeat if I could make it work somehow. We have a house here in Baltimore, though....
Toggle Commented Sep 26, 2009 on Turquoise, me, and the new NPR.org. at 1934
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"Autumnal suckies". Hmmm, I like it.
Toggle Commented Sep 13, 2009 on Was Zum Teufel?! at 1934
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Thanks! I took my friends from Seattle here to get an egg cream. They'd never had one. I'm loving the Camera Bag app right now....
Toggle Commented Jul 26, 2009 on Dean + Deluca. at 1934
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Thanks, Debbie! I like the last two best. Hmmmm.... I was also thinking about a name somehow related to the Tour de France. Have you guys been following it this year? Maybe I'll name her HIncapie, a tribute to George and his missed shot at le Maillot Jaune on Saturday. Sad.
Toggle Commented Jul 19, 2009 on L'assemblage. at 1934
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well, the fact that they snub whip cream makes me wonder about the degree of their guru-ness. The Italians are the experts afterall!
Toggle Commented Jul 17, 2009 on Espresso. Ristretto. Con panna, per favore. at 1934
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Thanks! I checked out your site and like it, too. I'll add it to my fashion section. :) Fashion is just another form of design and I •love• design.
Toggle Commented Jul 12, 2009 on Eh bien, quoi? at 1934
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I know! Thanks for your native take. I hope those guys read this....
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I think I'm going to be there in September. I need to book my flight! Mies is almost always hidden somewhere in pictures of me. They're called gray ghosts for a reason, I guess....
Toggle Commented Jul 6, 2009 on Slow bike. at 1934
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I know. Lindsay is just sooo...je ne sais quoi. Trashy, maybe?
Toggle Commented Jun 28, 2009 on Marilyn, revisited. at 1934
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I think we will. In about 3-4 years when this house appreciates some....
Toggle Commented Jun 20, 2009 on Dirty hands. at 1934
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Well, I don't think how you came to your point was communicated clearly, so I don't think it's fair to claim I was reckless. And I did point out that my issue was not with the design students' project. I was reacting to the quoted statement somewhat out of context. I think that what your post has to do with engineering and Romans is that you were referring specifically to design, which is what they do/did. Via engineering, Romans designed things that readily changed human behavior and affected our day-to-day lives (i.e., plumbing, the invention of concrete, etc). But of course, design is a nuanced word, used in the context of multiple disciplines. This wasn't clearly communicated. Again, I think changing human behavior is much easier in some design disciplines than in others. I agree that the Stanford students' project was assumptive, arrogant, dangerous, and pointless. And really not design in the true sense of the word, either. More like cognitive behavior, a discipline that coexists intimately with design, to be sure. Which leads me to think that your phrase could have been worded differently to communicate more about your thoughts on the ethics of the experiment. Regardless of the semantic misunderstandings, I still stand by the opinions asserted above. Although I can see your greater point about whether or not this is ethical, i.e., designers using their skills to try to change a person's behavior without a person's explicit consent. That's not the concept that initially jumped out at me, nor the one I was commenting on. In regards to "the academic world of bs design", I took a graduate seminar that actually touched on this specifically. It was a semiotics course and we spent the entire quarter talking about the meaning of images and signs and how much power we as designers have to communicate questionable things. How designers can use their design skills to skew or misrepresent information for a certain purpose, a la propaganda. Don't assume that academics don't think about that kind of stuff and/or fail to realize the gravity of design used with malintent or, worse, with ignorance. If anything, academics think about ethics and design far more than actual practitioners do, for the most part. I've never once had any conversation in a workplace about whether or not what we were designing was ethical. I feel I can say this with authority, since I have had at least one foot in both worlds for the past several years.
Toggle Commented Jun 5, 2009 on Design made you do it. at 1934
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They were $70. Not cheap, but not too bad...
Toggle Commented Jun 5, 2009 on The demise of form following function? at 1934
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Oooo, that sounds interesting. Which museum? I love SF!
Toggle Commented May 30, 2009 on Lens. at 1934
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Cool! Did he give you a free Kindle when they launched?
Toggle Commented May 29, 2009 on Typographic paradigms. at 1934
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i know. it's really relaxing. i don't get carsick when i read on the train, either.
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i know. it's really relaxing. i don't get carsick when i read on the train, either.
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i know. it's really relaxing. i don't get carsick when i read on the train, either.
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thanks! i would actually like to start making money with my photography. soon, i think...soon. had some really great espresso vivace this morning – thank you!!
Toggle Commented Apr 19, 2009 on My three boys. at 1934
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