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Tongue in Cheek
Provence, France
Recent Activity
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I will be back tomorrow. xxx Continue reading
Posted yesterday at Tongue in Cheek
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We are visiting friends this weekend. More to come... Continue reading
Posted 2 days ago at Tongue in Cheek
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The French brocante offers more than old things from someone's attic and more than boxes of disheveled junk. The French brocante is not just a place to find unbeatable prices for disregarded items, or the chance to find an unbelievable Picasso. It is a living museum with touch-able history where you can be the digger in the archaeological site and take your finds home. At the brocante French Husband and I met a dealer who collects Roman artifacts. The dealer has been collecting for years, he started selling not so long ago. His stand was full of rare interesting pieces... he freely shared his knowledge and stories. I became a sponge, soaking up every word. I think I must have asked two thousand questions that started with: "What is this?" I must admit I usually spend most my time at the brocante looking for things that speak in muted colored romance, old things that have more than their fair share of age, brocante items that have little monetary value but rather tell a story, depict a feeling. I guess you could say I am a sucker for worn beauty. Uneven certainty in worn items strikes a balance with me. Old coins, especially Roman artifacts, the dealer at the brocante told me are often found in fields where Roman roads traversed... he mentioned that when a field has recently been toiled bits and pieces from the past are brought to the surface. Driving home I looked at the poppy fields with new insight... Battles fought, lives lost, bits and pieces, stories, memories, buried within... and red poppies bloom. Maybe my new hunting ground should be in recently toiled fields but I think I would pick flowers instead. The brocante offers plenty without trespassing. What is your newest find? Continue reading
Posted 3 days ago at Tongue in Cheek
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Okay smarty pants, most of you guessed around the tool's name an Adze. Though Kipper said it first, "A woodworking tool, maybe used to make barrel staves?" That is it, that is why the handle is so short. Via Wiki, "The adze (/ˈædz/; alternative spelling: adz) is a cutting tool shaped somewhat like an axe that dates back to the stone age. It can be any tool with a sharp cutting edge.[1] Adzes are used for smoothing or carving wood in handwoodworking, similar to an axe but with the cutting edge perpendicular to the handle. Two basic forms of an adze are the hand adze, a short handled tool swung with one hand, and a foot adze, a long handled tool capable of powerful swings using both hands, the cutting edge usually striking at foot or shin level. The blade of an adze is set at right angles to the tool's shaft (like a hoe orplane), in contrast to an axe's blade, which is in plane with the shaft. A similar, but blunt, tool used for digging in hard ground is called a mattock." On Ebay there are a few, not as old, but nevertheless good shape. The creative response goes to: Diogenes said... "A neolithic razor for shaving?" Also welcome back Franca Bolla and dear brother Orama! xxx Continue reading
Posted 4 days ago at Tongue in Cheek
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lol
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on French Antique Guessing Game at Tongue in Cheek
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The two peas in a pod! And you did not say anything about Roaches.... Diogenes and Rebecca are going to be so disappointed.
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on French Antique Guessing Game at Tongue in Cheek
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Hey Welcome Brother!
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on French Antique Guessing Game at Tongue in Cheek
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Every now and then I come across an antique at the brocante that I do not know what it is. During the French Muse Experience I came across this piece and was stumped. Do you know what it is, what it is used for? If so write it in the comment section, or if you do not know what it is make up a response in the comment section. The first one to guess correctly will receive a gift as well as the most creative response. It is hand made. Solid iron with a wooden handle. Early 1800s, French. As you can see it isn't very big, but I am holding it with all my might. Good Luck. Continue reading
Posted 5 days ago at Tongue in Cheek
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Ruth says if I call shibori, "tied dyed" one more time she is going to dye me blue. Ruth is already a blue Smurf, so I guess I will be joining her. The French Muse had a shibori lesson that Ruth led. Ruth's garden was transformed into a Shibori studio, we had a blast and did not spill dye on us. Oh Ruth I couldn't help myself, look what I found, "The common English translation of the Japanese word shibori is "tie-dye". However, a more accurate translation is "shaped-resist dyeing," which describes the inherent patterning." ...via rugrabbit. Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at Tongue in Cheek
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The French Muse Experience had a marathon weekend: a brocante Saturday in Villeneuve les Avignon, then Isle sur la Sorgue, followed by Sunday in Carpentras, then a long lovely lunch at Chez Serge where we had many laughs and shared stories about what we found, and did not find. You would think we would be brocante-out after five days of brocanting, but no we are not. Simply because the group was easy going, fun loving, kind, considerate, enjoyed everything about Provence and loved to go antiquing. Lemon tart at Chez Serge. Sharing was constant. A French tradition has it that the person who has the last drop of wine from a wine bottle will be married before the end of the year. Suzette did not have the last drop. Who had the last drop? Lacoste The Guard's Door. 1600s Continue reading
Posted 7 days ago at Tongue in Cheek
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Photo Via Suzette who is with us on the French Muse. Everyone found something at the Chateau. Continue reading
Posted May 22, 2016 at Tongue in Cheek
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The French Muse Experience day five. Fields of poppies surprise us every day. If you want to see poppies May is the month to come to Provence. The French Muse is tailored made for each group that comes. Of course Ruth and I are crazy for the brocante so that is our main focus. Though there is much more to share and we gladly do. Private homes, artists, textiles and the countryside. Charland, one of our guest who also came last year, has a thing for trees. She has asked us about every tree she has seen... Olive, plane, chestnut, cherry, parasol pine, cyprus... but there are many more we simply do not know about. Ruth reminded Charland, "We are about the brocante, not trees." Charland did not miss a beat, and started asking us about flowers. Thank God for poppies. Amongst the poppies I found these. Daisies and clover, right? Brocante flowers that never fade. Villeneuve les Avignon, a well known brocante every Saturday has a fantastic view. At the brocante in Villeneuve there is a cafe, an oyster bar, a pizza truck and Gaston's. Often there is music, a park across the street and many antiques. Not far away is Isle sur la Sorgue. The largest antique gathering in the south of France. So we did both today. Yellow confit pots. Plenty of them. A darling carousel rabbit. Wooden and hand-painted. An easel with paint buckets full of used paint brushes and a painting. A toy horse with a hat. The lavender museum. The lavender is starting to wake up. If you want to see it in full bloom the end of June to the first part of July is when to come. We had dinner on the terrace. Of course we had cheese, baguettes and wine. Dessert: Friendship, brocante, spring evening, with the promise of more. Continue reading
Posted May 21, 2016 at Tongue in Cheek
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French Muse Experience... Feast for the eyes, heart, the senses and the stomach. My friend Lisa gave us a house tour of her beautiful home, and then served us an incredible dinatoire, a French word for a dinner that is like a extra large aperitif. Of course Babette was there to steal everyone's heart. Champagne, over looking the charming town of Lagnes. Go over the day's activities. Lourmarin, Lauris, Pertuis... Visiting two homes, One market, Lunch in Lourmarin, Dinner at Chez Margot... A ton of lavender sachets. Continue reading
Posted May 20, 2016 at Tongue in Cheek
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How to park a car in France? Well don't ask Ruth. Continue reading
Posted May 20, 2016 at Tongue in Cheek
She does! The hat comes in a variety of colors.
Toggle Commented May 20, 2016 on French Muse Experience: Day Three at Tongue in Cheek
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I am talking the photos, and Ruth is there with the orange hat!
Toggle Commented May 20, 2016 on French Muse Experience: Day Three at Tongue in Cheek
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Barbara did!!
Toggle Commented May 20, 2016 on French Muse Experience: Day Three at Tongue in Cheek
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Yes you are right! Uncanny. I will ask and let you know. The medal should soon arrive.xx
Toggle Commented May 19, 2016 on The French Muse: Day Two at Tongue in Cheek
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What a kind thing to say, thank you Joanny. xx
Toggle Commented May 19, 2016 on The French Muse: Day Two at Tongue in Cheek
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I did not, as they belong to Mo. But I can ask her if she wants to sell any. What colors are you interested in?
Toggle Commented May 19, 2016 on The French Muse: Day Two at Tongue in Cheek
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Yes we are! Though the true treasures are the friendships!
Toggle Commented May 19, 2016 on The French Muse: Day Two at Tongue in Cheek
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We wish you and Dee were!! xxx
Toggle Commented May 19, 2016 on The French Muse: Day Two at Tongue in Cheek
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Yes you did spy an ex voto. It belongs to my friend Mo. xx
Toggle Commented May 19, 2016 on The French Muse: Day Two at Tongue in Cheek
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The French Muse Experience. The view this morning from where we are staying in Lacoste. Aix en Provence market was our destination. Our goal was to shop for the much loved Provencal linen clothing. We had a late start, that can happen on holidays. We were talking so much we missed the turn off, nobody seemed to mind. Ruth dropped us off at the top of the market, and within five minutes our bags were too heavy to carry. This lady lost her head while shopping madly. Linen dresses at the market run from 20 to 75 Euros. Most are about 39 Euros. The Mistral was blowing which made this May day feel like October. The sky was brilliant blue, the trees freshly crowned green, the vibrant spring colors were showing off. While at the market with two million (not really) other people, Ruth and I had an idea to have our own market, to invite different stand owners to come and give us a private show. Pure decadency. The Happy Muses in Aix. Continue reading
Posted May 19, 2016 at Tongue in Cheek
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We started out early and headed towards the chateau to explore, do the brocante, visit our antique dealer friend Nelly and then we had a picnic on the chateau grounds. Afterwards we went to our other friend Mo who is a potter extraordinaire. Mo works with black clay with a white glaze. Plus her garden was in full bloom, roses galore. The group Charland, Barbara and Suzette are fun loving, easy going, brocante loving and love to tease. The week is going by too fast! Nelly has revamped her entire downstairs. An incredible amount of work and easier to get around. Each of us found something to take home. In each of the boxes there is either lace or trims, buttons or fabric, notions for hats or costumes or tassels or thread or something in regards to creating. Charland found an 1800s sample box of silk threads. 1700 to 1800s French marriage boxes safekeeping important documents. Hand painted with antique paper lining. My favorite was this 1700s divider and statue. 1700s beautiful paper books with hand sewn bindings. Alain, our friend and antique dealer, with Barbara. Hand carved piece of wood. This came home with me. Mo gave us a tour of her lovely home and garden. Roses growing everywhere and in full bloom. We picked cherries. Follow Mo's blog here: http://revesdargile.canalblog.com/ Later we went to my home for dinner, then headed back to Lacoste. If you have any questions about the French Muse let me know, and I will try to answer them. Continue reading
Posted May 18, 2016 at Tongue in Cheek
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