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Tongue in Cheek
Provence, France
Recent Activity
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Thank you for the generous, encouraging comments yesterday. I appreciate your following and admiring our effort in creating a home in Cassis. The floors in the fisherman's house were a hodge podge of different tiles and cement, plus most of the second floor/first floor ceiling was taken out, due to sloping, replacing two beams and moving the stairs to the other side... we replaced the floors with white oak floorboards. I kept the tradition and did not use, oh man what is the word? I know in French it is plinthe. That is one thing about living away from my mother tongue, sometimes English words that I have not used in awhile seem to go back to California and wait for me to return. Okay, found it with google translate, baseboards. As century old French buildings are more often that not, made of stones, the walls are not flat or even. I did not want to sacrifice one inch using sheet rock to have flat straight even walls. Have you ever tried to use a baseboard on stone walls? Yeah not a pretty sight. Fillers are needed, and to me it seems to accent the wrong thing. Practical is rarely a word I use in design, blame that on my mother, as she use to say, "You have to suffer to be beautiful." I grew up thinking practical did not mean beautiful. Practical implies easy. Today I am going to show "going up" to the the bedroom. In the beginning, there was a ladder that went up to the bedroom. A ladder that freaked me out as it reminded me of when I was wallpapering and the ladder broke, and the monkey got choked and my wrist was shattered. Anyway, I knew we had to come up with a different system. Plus removing, gutting the closet and the toilet that use to be upstairs, meant that we could also eliminate the wall and dropped ceiling, which would make the bedroom a loft with a view of the port. So without hesitation it was goodbye convenient toilet and spacious closet. The hand rail, Joel made by my description of what I see in Provence's homes and garden. The hooks work well in stone walls. Joel made the rods fluid, what means they are not straight, but seem to flow naturally with the rounded stone walls. The loft bedroom: As the bathroom... Continue reading
Posted yesterday at Tongue in Cheek
Thank you, we really enjoy working together. It seems no idea I have is too hard or too wild to accomplish. I think Rene has golden hands.
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Merci! lol, no I do not confuse bowls, objects and such, but I have woken up wondering what bed I am in. Rene Texas? Why not. Or why not HGTV come here?
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lol, me and numbers!!! I have since corrected my error. Remember when we had a drink in the dust and debris. Well this is how I saw it in my mind's eye.
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s/e thanks for telling me about CIndy's book, I haven't seen it yet.
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I have been looking for those letters!!! When are you coming back? Doesn't it look different from the first time you saw it?!
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Hi Star! Thank you. How are you feeling?
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Thank you Debbie, soon you will see first hand, with Eric too!
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Hope to see you in Cassis!
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Last August I found a fisherman's house for sale on the port in Cassis. French Husband and I had dreamed of a place in Cassis for many years, but nothing came up that we could afford... and then by lucky chance the fisherman's house came our way. The house was in need of major repair, most would have found it daunting, though we had a master contractor on our side: Rene the hero made it happen. I have delayed showing photos of our place because I wanted everything to be ready down to the dishes in the cupboards, and paintings hung. It is 99 percent completed, and the unveiling can begin. Instead of showing everything all at once I will do it in sections. First, the stairwell, as it was the most complicated configuration in the entire renovation process due to the space, the beams and because we moved the stairs from one side to the other of the house. Without Joel the clever brilliant blacksmith we would still be going up and down a ladder. The first series show part of the the second floor stairwell, there are three floors connecting 65 meters, or 700 square feet. Those of you who know me, know the brocante bug has captured me to my very core, and to the hair on my chinny-chin-chin. When renovating the fisherman's house it was easy to see what walls to knock down, where and how to create the space. Though as time went on, I saw the fisherman's house more contemporary than I ever imagined, I felt it challenging me to keep it that way. The light was an holophane street lamp from the1920s. We bought it at a brocante fair. The brocante dealer, who I know, told me over and over again that I was doing the right thing, and that it was worth four times more than the price he was selling it for. Rene transformed the holophane into a hanging light as I wanted. The painting is from Camille, an artist who I also met at the brocante. Camille's wife was a dance teacher who became an antique dealer. One afternoon while at a brocante (with my friend Gina,) we cut through Camille's wife's brocante shop as to not have to walk around the block, that day she had her husband's paintings on display. Camille is in his eighties now, and he... Continue reading
Posted 2 days ago at Tongue in Cheek
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French School Book...SOLD Continue reading
Posted 2 days ago at Tongue in Cheek Antiques
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Dumouriez Gensonné Camille Desloulins Robespierre Lafayette Danton Initially, I was attracted to these engravings because of how well dressed they were. Then I read their names, they were part of the French Revolution. Do you know the part they played? Continue reading
Posted 3 days ago at Tongue in Cheek
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Did you know that French Husband has a bunny collection? One by one, and he has a ton, will populate our home, an Easter parade. The ceramic bunnies were used for pate. Rabbit pate. Of course French Husband doesn't collect them for that reason, nope, instead that is were we hide the Easter eggs. More bunnies to come. Continue reading
Posted 4 days ago at Tongue in Cheek
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Spring in Provence: The almond trees bloom pink, the cherry trees put on white, bird song fills the air, the light of the day softens, a blush covers the trees as they wake up. It is a lovely time to be in Provence. Soft spots. Tiny spring flowers. The scent of harmony, inviting the seasons to merge. Caressing the day with pink light that lingers into the evening. Beginning stories of spring. Spring in Provence, the chill in the air leaves by noon, just in time to enjoy having lunch outside. Numero 9- Rue du Temple, 84160 Lourmarin 04 90 79 00 46 Has Spring cause my French Husband to play with his food? Or maybe my bad habits have finally dented his properness. Oh Cassis! Continue reading
Posted 5 days ago at Tongue in Cheek
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Hi, Corey! Your brocante post detailing your box-digging escapades came at the perfect time!! You see, last week, I was in my attic (aka hoarder's den) & found a box of my late dad's belongings that he had brought up here from Virginia 10 years ago. It had been in my attic all that time. I carried the box down 2 flights of stairs. I scrambled in the box, delighting in his "treasures..." old letters, knick-knacks, things that had belonged to his much-older brothers, even a $5 Confederate bill! Now, imagine digging more than halfway through the box, and finding THIS: Photo Via Tara Rey's Photo and Text: Tara, a blog reader of Tongue in Cheek, sent me this email. With Tara's permission I have posted her photo and email here: Yep! That's a WWII-era grenade, with a pin in it and no hole in the bottom of it! What ensued was a visit to my attached neighbor's (we live in a twin) to alert them we'd found a grenade in Pop's belongings and there would probably be some "activity." I gingerly removed the rest of the treasures from the box and took the box outside (I figured it had been jostled down 2 flights of stairs...certainly, it could hold out for a move out the door!) Then, a policewoman, a fireman, then the captain, then THE BOMB SQUAD (mon Dieu!)--who x-rayed it and couldn't determine if it was live--they boxed it in a bomb squad container and hauled it away. It turns out, it wasn't live after all, but that is my recent digging story and I knew you'd LOVE IT! What discovery have you made lately? Cheers! Tara Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at Tongue in Cheek
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1900s Seashell inkwell and letter holder with the tiniest blue feather for the finest of lines. 35 Euros ($40) includes postage and tax. Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at Tongue in Cheek Antiques