This is willwheels's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following willwheels's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
willwheels
Recent Activity
I don't have a good answer to your question, but I have heard many times that the most common argument regarding BCAs is about the baseline, and this post is a good example. I'm frankly not sure what our air office assumes about the baseline: air quality could improve, get worse, or stay the same.
1 reply
Matthew Kahn would say that you can't ignore adaptation, and he'd be right over the course of 30-something years.
Toggle Commented Nov 19, 2014 on I took the bait at Environmental Economics
1 reply
And they (you?) already started a thread about this! http://www.econjobrumors.com/topic/another-econ-blogger-outed-as-a-bro-calls-out-c901
1 reply
I follow the literature on optimal fines a little, but I'm not familiar with any on this kind of violation. Does anyone have any references? Thanks!
1 reply
That's fantastic!
Toggle Commented Oct 20, 2014 on Dubious and Dubiouser* at Environmental Economics
1 reply
Congratulations!
1 reply
I definitely agree with the discussion on revealed versus stated preference data. Kerry Smith, in "50 years of Contingent Valuation" (possibly copyright-infringing version at http://gul.gu.se/public/pp/public_file_archive/archive.html?publishedItemId=24260163&courseId=60287&fileId=23898293) has some great examples of data that is treated as "real" but is really derived from hypothetical questions. No firm stand on WTP/WTA, although EPA's Guidelines generally call for WTP on the basis that we deal with environmental improvements and the reference point for WTP is the absence of such an improvement. Very nice paper.
1 reply
"Boring, not funny, uninteresting, not attractive at all." Do you really read your reviews to class on the first day?
1 reply
Crabs in Boston?
1 reply
A cite!
1 reply
So we need to randomly assign faculty to administration to figure out causality?
1 reply
Putting this on the reading pile.
1 reply
Looks like a good list, although EE always seems a little too-highly ranked to me.
1 reply
While I'm not sure I've heard that specifically, I certainly have heard similar pronouncements from ecologists who heard something incorrect about economics (or a caricature of economics) and then pass it along uncritically.
1 reply
Jesus, that's awful.
1 reply
If citations are a flow resulting from a stock of research output, your career might have peaked earlier (depending on the parameters). Mine peaked before yours.
1 reply
"I was disappointed that he canceled classes." That's incredible.
Toggle Commented May 6, 2014 on They like me? at Environmental Economics
1 reply
An entire course of lectures on Human Capital is youtube, they are great: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL9334868E7A821E2A
1 reply
So, how did it go?
1 reply
He thinks in exclamation points! My mind is blown!
1 reply
I love this, it's like the eggs are already hard-boiled and can't break! Or maybe Mark doesn't know the difference between golf balls and sea turtle eggs!
Toggle Commented Apr 1, 2014 on "Sea turtle eggs!" at Environmental Economics
1 reply
I prefer "Potpourri," following the convention in Jeopardy. Also, "pseudo-dynamic?"
1 reply
The DeGruyter website is an absolute mess (still--although they finally fixed NCEE's subscription), but they say that they are no longer promising to meet the BE Press turnaround time, so I assume not. I can't get over their switcheroo either.
1 reply
http://obs.rc.fas.harvard.edu/chetty/referee_experiment.pdf (His website is really nice.) We were talking about this paper at work, I wonder if the shaming would have worked better at a journal not owned by a publisher that is the subject of a referee boycott. Would praise have worked better? The BE Press system seemed to me to work well--submission fees were waived if you promised two quick reviews (I forget the time frame).
1 reply
How is lost time for government employees counted? Also, I found it odd that EPA blocked the ESPN bracket site but not the CBS site.
1 reply