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Terri Windling
Dartmoor, in England's West Country
Writer, artist, book editor, folklorist.
Interests: myth and mythic arts
Recent Activity
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"Why one writes is a question I can answer easily, having so often asked it of myself. I believe one writes because one has to create a world in which one can live. I could not live in any of... Continue reading
Posted yesterday at Myth & Moor
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From "Seeing Around the Corners" by Susan Cooper (1976): "But of course, the whole process is a mystery, in all the arts. Creativity, in literature, painting, music. Or in performance: those rare lovely moments in the theater when an actor... Continue reading
Posted yesterday at Myth & Moor
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From The Getaway Car: A Practical Memoir About Writing and Life by Ann Patchett: "Why is it we understand that playing the cello will require work but we relegate writing to the magic of inspiration? Chances are, any child who... Continue reading
Posted 3 days ago at Myth & Moor
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For more on walking, I recommend this lovely article: "The Sacred Art of Dog Walking" by Chris La Tray https://www.emptymirrorbooks.com/personal-essay/sacred-art-of-dog-walking
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on The Gentle Art of Tramping at Myth & Moor
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Gorgeous, gorgeous, gorgeous.
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on The Gentle Art of Tramping at Myth & Moor
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Thank you, Ruth. Still in bed today, but I'm hoping it won't be for too much longer.
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on Tunes for a Monday Morning at Myth & Moor
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Howard has been playing bouzouki lately too, and I'm loving the sound of it in the house. Good luck with the Shruti Box, Christina!
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on Tunes for a Monday Morning at Myth & Moor
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Robert Macfarlane wandered all across the British Isles before writing such fine books as Holloway, The Old Ways, and The Wild Places; and in this passage from the latter, he pays tribute to a kindred spirit, the Scottish writer Stephen... Continue reading
Posted 4 days ago at Myth & Moor
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Today, music from the members of Salt House, a Scottish folk trio consisting of Ewan MacPherson (from Shooglenifty), Lauren MacColl (from the all-women fiddle group Rant), and Jenny Sturgeon (whose project Northern Flyaway, about the music, folklore, and ecology of... Continue reading
Posted 5 days ago at Myth & Moor
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"We use the expression 'being lost in a book,' but we are really closer to a state of being found," writes Carol Shields. "Curled up with a novel about an East Indian family, for instance, we are not so much... Continue reading
Posted 7 days ago at Myth & Moor
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From Startle and Illuminate, a collection of writing about writing by Canadian author Carol Shields (1935-2003): "The resolution to become a writer formed very early in my life, but it took years for me to to discover what I would... Continue reading
Posted Feb 15, 2018 at Myth & Moor
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Epithalamium by Adam Zagajewski translated from the Polish by Clare Cavanagh Without silence there would be no music. Life paired is doubtless more difficult than solitary existence - just as a boat on the open sea with outstretched sails is... Continue reading
Posted Feb 14, 2018 at Myth & Moor
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These were simply books I've read or re-read very recently (which were stacked on my desk and prompted this post), not a definitive list of the best short story writers, which would certainly include men -- such as the men quoted in this post.
Toggle Commented Feb 13, 2018 on In praise of small things at Myth & Moor
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''We who make stories know that we tell lies for a living. But they are good lies that say true things, and we owe it to our readers to build them as best we can. Because somewhere out there is... Continue reading
Posted Feb 13, 2018 at Myth & Moor
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"In the Author’s mind there bubbles up every now and then the material for a story," said C.S. Lewis in an essay on writing for children. "For me it invariably begins with mental pictures. This ferment leads to nothing unless... Continue reading
Posted Feb 13, 2018 at Myth & Moor
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She's extraordinary. I admire her work so much.
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As Danielle Barlow just reminded me, there's also a lovely edition of Noyes' "The Highwayman" illustrated by Charles Keeping.
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Today's theme is highwaymen (and their bold female counterparts) in British balladry. It's a subject of particular interest to me, for I've recently learned that I'm very, very distantly related to one John Clavell (1601-1643), known in his day as... Continue reading
Posted Feb 11, 2018 at Myth & Moor
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"What would Robin Hood have made of Country Life's recent excavation into the fantasies of British 7-to-14-year-olds concerning the wild life and wild places of their native land?" asks poet and scholar Ruth Padel. "Two thirds had no idea where... Continue reading
Posted Feb 8, 2018 at Myth & Moor
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Once upon a time there was poor man who had barely enough to feed his family. As he sat before the fire, sighing over his misfortune, he heard a knock on the window. When he opened the shutters, he found... Continue reading
Posted Feb 7, 2018 at Myth & Moor
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Today I'm on the trail of the Wild Children of myth, lore, and fantasy: children lost in the forest, abandoned, stolen, reared by wild animals, and those for whom wilderness is their natural element and home. Tales of babies left... Continue reading
Posted Feb 7, 2018 at Myth & Moor
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Merlin (pictured in the beautiful drawing by Alan Lee above) is a figure intimately connected with forests in Arthurian lore. After the disastrous Battle of Arderydd, Merlin goes mad and spends years as a wild man in the woods, living... Continue reading
Posted Feb 6, 2018 at Myth & Moor
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Kristian Matsson's comments in the last video reminded me of one of my all-time favorite poems: TO BE OF USE by Marge Piercy The people I love the best jump into work head first without dallying in the shallows and swim off with sure strokes almost out of sight. They seem to become natives of that element, the black sleek heads of seals bouncing like half-submerged balls. I love people who harness themselves, an ox to a heavy cart, who pull like water buffalo, with massive patience, who strain in the mud and the muck to move things forward, who do what has to be done, again and again. I want to be with people who submerge in the task, who go into the fields to harvest and work in a row and pass the bags along, who are not parlor generals and field deserters but move in a common rhythm when the food must come in or the fire be put out. The work of the world is common as mud. Botched, it smears the hands, crumbles to dust. But the thing worth doing well done has a shape that satisfies, clean and evident. Greek amphoras for wine or oil, Hopi vases that held corn, are put in museums but you know they were made to be used. The pitcher cries for water to carry and a person for work that is real. - from Circles on the Water by Marge Piercy (Knopf, 1982), all rights reserved by the author.
Toggle Commented Feb 5, 2018 on Tunes for a Monday Morning at Myth & Moor
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This morning I've been listening to yMusic, a brilliantly innovative chamber ensemble from New York City composed of Hideaki Aomori (clarinet), Gabriel Cabezas (cello), C.J. Camerieri (trumpet), Alex Dopp (flute), Rob Moose (violin), and Nadia Sirota (viola). If you like... Continue reading
Posted Feb 4, 2018 at Myth & Moor
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In Gossip from the Forest: The Tangled Roots of Our Forests and Fairy Tales, Sara Maitland writes: "Forests to the [early] Northern European peoples were dangerous and generous, domestic and wild, beautiful and terrible. And the forests were the terrain... Continue reading
Posted Feb 1, 2018 at Myth & Moor
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