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Terri Windling
Dartmoor, in England's West Country
Writer, artist, book editor, folklorist.
Interests: myth and mythic arts
Recent Activity
Your poem is exquisite too, my dear. And yes, fits in with today's music perfectly!
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on Tunes for a Monday Morning at Myth & Moor
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Today, songs of soldiers and sailors and the ones they leave behind, from the English, Irish, and Scottish folk traditions -- with art by Sir John Everett Millais (1829-1896), a founding member of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. Above: "The Soldier and... Continue reading
Posted yesterday at Myth & Moor
Yes, we've definitely noticed a downturn in the art market. Brexit is already affecting the economy, and people are afraid to spend, not knowing what "fresh hell" (as Dorothy Parker would surely have described Brexit) we'll wake up to tomorrow.
Toggle Commented 3 days ago on Grandfather's Garden Studio at Myth & Moor
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You are breaking my heart. This collage-poem/evocation is like the words of a spell, conjuring my own personal collage of David moments, stitched together with the ache of missing him. "Collaging Life" is beautiful, dear.
Toggle Commented 3 days ago on The art of creating a life at Myth & Moor
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The Birmingham Art gallery's collection is extraordinary, isn't it? It's been too long since I've been up there, though. Perhaps another road trip is in order... I'm fascinated by the "Birmingham group" of artists and their contribition to the Arts & Crafts movement. I have a post about it in the works -- but I've also got a busy couple of weeks ahead, so I'm not sure when I'll get it done and up. I love the smell of oil paint -- but I shared my Tuscon studio for years with a sculptor friend, Beckie Kravetz, who was allergic to it, so I used a water-based oil paint there instead. Since I use my oil paints very thinly, almost like they are watercolors (a technique I learned years ago from Tom Canty), I didn't find much difference between the water-based oil paints and the proper oil paints, other than the fact that the latter dried more quickly and so I had to work with them more quickly too. I've never tried gouache; have you? I hope your own writing and art is thriving, Stuart.
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on Grandfather's Garden Studio at Myth & Moor
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I find these links between our lives and the lives that have gone before us so fascinating. It one of the main reasons I love the Mythic Arts field.
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on Grandfather's Garden Studio at Myth & Moor
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Lordy yes, I've met too many men in my lifetime who *still* don't think women can be first-rate artists, or writers. This poisonous idea persists and persists and persists. Heck, back when we entered the fantasy field, Charles, there were still many loud and influential men who didn't think women should be editors either! My first years of working in the New York publishing industry often felt like one big fight for the right to be there at the table at all. The world has changed a bit since then, but not enough. Not nearly enough. And, of course, the post-Weinstein discussions happening across many fields, including our own, makes me think of all the books, paintings, films, etc. etc. that we have lost due to the hostile work environments created by people somehow unable to treat human beings of a different gender (or race, or class, or sexual orientation) as worthy of of basic dignity and respect. I'm also thinking of all the times I quietly stepped away from publishing projects or job opportunities myself in order not to have to deal with a particular man or another. I am angry now not only for the women (and noncorforming men) whose careers have been impacted or cut short; I am angry for all of us: for all the wonderful works of art (and culture, science, etc.) the world has lost to this nonsense. Regarding Bodichon, I think Hirsch is right that it's not *just* sexism that has caused this extraordinary woman's name to go from fame to obscurity. As she points out, cultural historians seem to find it easier to assess and praise the lives of people who do one thing superlatively well, as opposed to those who wear many different hats and do many different things. To me, Barbara is an icon for those of us who can't confine ourselves to one area of endeavor. What we lose in precision and focus in each area of our lives by diffusing our energy in this manner, we gain (I believe) in the way each area of endeavor informs the others, and the synergy of the whole. Or at least I very much want to believe this is true, being a woman, like Barbara, whose life more resembles a collage than an oil painting....
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on The art of creating a life at Myth & Moor
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The biography of her by Pam Hirsch is well worth a read. Her life story is pretty amazing.
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on The art of creating a life at Myth & Moor
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Barbara's work was widely exhibited in her day, even if it isn't well known in ours -- so at least she had that satisfaction in her lifetime. Her paintings are indeed wonderful -- especially when you see them in person. Her fidelity to nature (as a passionate botanist) and to natural light, her loose deft brush stokes and luminous colorwork anticipate aspects of Impressionism. Alas, the digital reproductions here don't do them justice. For those of you in America: The Delaware Art Museum, which has a good Pre-Raphaelite collection, is planning a Barbara Bodichon exhibition for next year. http://www.delart.org/exhibits/politics-and-paint-barbara-bodichon/
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on The art of creating a life at Myth & Moor
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If your general impression of Pre-Raphaelite women is that they all drooped languidly among the lilies, beautiful and passive, their role confined to inspiring the famous men around them...well, think again. There were many fine women artists and artisans in... Continue reading
Posted 4 days ago at Myth & Moor
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In her charming little book Three Houses, novelist Angela Thirkell looks back on the houses of her late-Victorian childhood -- including The Grange, an 18th century house in North End Lane in West Kensington, London, the home of Angela's grandparents:... Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at Myth & Moor
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Whenever discussing Pre-Raphaelite house design (as we were yesterday), I'm always reminded of this wry description of Edward Burne-Jones' country place, North End House in Rottingdean, as seen from a child's perspective. The child is his grand-daughter, who grew up... Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at Myth & Moor
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A few weeks ago I joined two of my oldest friends -- harpist/composer/filmmaker Elizabeth-Jane Baldry and artist Marja Lee Kruÿt -- for a road trip to Kelmscott Manor in Oxfordshire, the country house of William and Jane Morris, their children...and,... Continue reading
Posted 7 days ago at Myth & Moor
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I'm out of the studio today, so there's no Monday Music this week I'm afraid. It's not for any glamorous reason, but because Tilly has a vet appointment over in Okehampton, and the household bookkeeping needs attention. I'll be back... Continue reading
Posted Dec 4, 2017 at Myth & Moor
No snow for us here in Chagford, alas, but I see a dusting of white on the distant hills of the moor. I agree with you, Stuart: We need art and stories to shine a light into the darkness more than ever. It sometimes seems a small thing to do in these troubled and frightening times, but I'm determined to continue to do it. "I had better come clean now and say that I do not believe that art (all art) and beauty are ever separate, nor do I believe that either art or beauty are optional in a sane society." - Jeanette Winterson
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I'd like to end the week by sharing these illustrations created by Florence Harrison (1877-1955) for two volumes of William Morris' poetry: The Defence Guenevere & Other Poems and The Early Poems of William Morris. Both editions were published by... Continue reading
Posted Nov 30, 2017 at Myth & Moor
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Today, let's look at contemporary photography inspired by Pre-Raphaelite art: images based on specific paintings by Rossetti, Millais, and others; and those that simply conjure the spirit of the art, with a moden twist. Above, for example, Australian photographer Donna... Continue reading
Posted Nov 30, 2017 at Myth & Moor
The news right now is a daily dose of trauma, but it's my mission to face that horror with beauty: not as a means of avoiding the Good Fight, but as food for the soul to keep to us going.
Toggle Commented Nov 29, 2017 on Fantasy & the Pre-Raphaelites at Myth & Moor
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Sweet dreams, dear Michelle.
Toggle Commented Nov 29, 2017 on Doing it for love at Myth & Moor
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As a big supporter of libraries, and a recent adoptee of the Patreon model, I agree that is heartening that there are ways to make art accessible for everyone while ensuring that art-makers don't starve...but I also agree that our whole system of fund art needs a serious overhaul. I, too, long for change.
Toggle Commented Nov 29, 2017 on Doing it for love at Myth & Moor
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Tilly doesn't talk back to me, but she does talk back to Howard. They often have long conversations. I don't understand what they're talking about -- it's in a crooning, grunting kind of dog language -- but they seem to understand each other. Hilarious to watch.
Toggle Commented Nov 29, 2017 on Doing it for love at Myth & Moor
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I truly hate the wide-spread idea that we can't be artists unless we work at it full time. A study done a couple of years ago determined that the median income for professional published authors here in the UK is well below the minimum wage. Few writers live solely on that kind of income. In the U.S, the majority of professional writers I know don't earn their living solely from their books. They also teach, or edit, or have other kinds of day jobs -- or they have supportive spouses (of both genders) or other sources of income. If it's "selling out" to have a day job to support your art, then many, many of the writers & artists whose work we all love are sell-outs too...so you're in good company. Gracious, what a treat to have Maggie and Fox raised as examples in this context. It's like meeting old friends in an unexpected place.
Toggle Commented Nov 29, 2017 on Doing it for love at Myth & Moor
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Thank you, Stasha. What a gift this is. I'm honored.
Toggle Commented Nov 29, 2017 on Doing it for love at Myth & Moor
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I remember when our daughter was going through the same thing: trying to figure out her path into a future that was anything but clear. There were times, early on, when we wondered whether she'd ever find her way...but when the time was right, the mist lifted and she knew precisely which road to choose. Now, years later, she's still on that road, and very happy, and doing work she is passionate about. Your words to your son are wise and true. May he find his way.
Toggle Commented Nov 29, 2017 on Doing it for love at Myth & Moor
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Oh, my. That is a wonderful birthday present indeed. Where is Kelly's quote from? I want to read more....
Toggle Commented Nov 29, 2017 on Doing it for love at Myth & Moor
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