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Stephen Gordon
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Maybe 'unpublish' instead of an outright 'delete'? I found this interesting, but then again, I've never given CWEN much thought. It always seemed like something that had nothing to do with me. I don't know if that's a good thing or a bad thing.
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No kidding. I wonder what the R2 is on that equation - 0.9999?
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You correctly anticipated where I was going to go next with this line of thought!
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Oh no - now you've jinxed it!
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This is an old habit, as far as I can tell.
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I thought it was only me. That's probably a widely-held sentiment.
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Fine, except 1) StatsCan doesn't tell you that. For all anyone knows, these series are completely incompatible. 2) If you look up the IPPI, they don't tell you where the old series are or how/if you can splice them 3) Why don't they do the splicing for us and publish the long series?
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I get the impression there are quite a few series like that - at least at the more aggregated levels. Often what happens is there's a change in the way they break things down by industry/occupation/product/etc, but not in the actual total.
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So would I. I'll share whatever response I get, if there is one.
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Oh no, I didn't know. Mike was also a great teacher, and he was graduate director when I was doing my PhD. He contributed so much to U of T and to Canadian economics generally.
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The graphs above are the growth rates of a given percentile over 2 points in time: eg, change in 75th percentile between 2007 and 2012. The graph I posted on twitter took the average of a given percentile over 1997-2000 and compared it to the average of the same percentile over 2006-10.
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I wasn't actually trying to reproduce the Green and Sand results, especially insofar as they only looked at full-time workers. The reduction in earnings from cutting back on hours worked by part-time workers during the recession is something I wanted to take into account.
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rsj: I know the census PUMF truncate income at the top, but I don't recall seeing anything about that in the LFS documentation (it may be, I just don't remember seeing it). But even if they aren't, the point is still well-taken. The numbers at the extremes - say, the top/bottom 2% or 3% - should definitely be taken with a grain if salt. But the real story IMV is what's happening across the entire distribution. Joe: Yes, it's about wages. Robert: No. I wanted to see what was happening in the labour market.
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Well, the vertical scale *is* different. But I think it's more that the pre-2002 data are dragging down the 1997-2006 data. eta: I just added a link to a graph with the same vertical axis.
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Nor is there anything obliging Canadian investors to keep their savings in Canada.
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Yeah, it's generally not a good idea to push econometric models way outside the range of data used in the estimation. Those numbers were what the model gives with \Delta t = -0.14.
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Patrick: If the feds reduced the CIT from 15% to 1%, you'd need a GST of roughly 10% to make up for the loss of $30b in federal CIT revenues. OTOH, the provinces would find their CIT revenues increase by $20b/yr in the long run.
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Patrick: That would require provincial cooperation. The combined federal-provincial rate is 15+11.1 = 26.1% Frank Restly: This isn't a zero-sum re-allocation of income. Increasing the CIT reduces investment and capital accumulation, which reduces total income.
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Yes, that's the efficiency argument. But there seem to be people who don't care about the efficiency argument and are concerned with revenues. I'm going to have to add a section my CIT reading list
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The issue isn't the tax revenues; it's the increase in the cost of capital produced by higher corporate taxes. This reduces investment, which in turn reduces output, incomes and wages.
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Wrong. Corporate taxes are the most harmful to economic growth.
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At Laval in the '70's, we did what Evan suggest. Intro ran side-by-side. That's still the way it's taught at Laval. Principes micro and Principes macro are two separate half courses, and students are expected to take both in their first term in the program.
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Wow. I had been vaguely aware of the Canadian wave of migration to the US around that time, but not of its scale. That really is an interesting counterfactual
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If that was meant as an reply to me, then you didn't actually reply. And I'm getting not a little annoyed at the lazy accusations of 'misleading'. You're not addressing the point I'm making.
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Why are these things unique to the middle class? It certainly looks to me as households in lower-income groups are facing the same problems, if not worse. So why represent them as 'middle-class' problems?
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