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Lindsay Jenkins
Author, formerly City of London and the Ministry of Defence
Interests: Director of Better Off Out
Recent Activity
Cutting government debt, not borrowing to increase that debt, should be top of Osborne's list. We have heard the words, we have not seen the action. Is low tax, low regulation beyond the Coalition's understanding?
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Roger is spot on - as usual. So what can we do? A weak PM, many weak Minsters no doubt chosen in his image, all wrecking destruction on our country. The Conservatives still (just) harbour excellent people on the backbenches and Boris. We need a true Conservative revolution.
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"exactly how problematic it is all depends on the deal that France and Germany are putting together, but that is still secret". Precisely. That has been the situation since 1963. Merkel and Sarkozy have already announced their plans to celebrate 50 years of the Elysee Treaty in 2013. Former PMs, who knew their history, would have realised that a Franco-Germanic bloc would be inimical to Britain's interests in the world and acted to counter-balance it. Not only do we have a PM who somehow missed out on history at school, not even covering history's approximation in today's dumbed down curriculum, the Second World War, but this country is run by the EU. When is the penny going to drop? It is now a pretty big penny! Are we to be reduced to the Troika landing at Heathrow before HMG realises we should have left the EU? There is no middle way so beloved of the Fabian Society. The only way is out.
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How much we have relied on Roger's commonsense, no nonsense, highly perceptive and courageous views from Brussels. What a big hole his departure will leave. I hope - after the long and deserved rest - he will continue to hold the airwaves in the UK.
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Quite right - this is the place for that precious commodity, freedom of speech, a freedom not much in evidence inside the security cordon.
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Compassionate Conservatism sounds wonderful - but not if you have no job. As a matter of urgency this government should be reviewing all tax. There is no tax which creates jobs - other than ones in HMRC, accountancy and legal firms seeking ways round it. The 50p tax says we are not open for business, go elsewhere. Businessmen are doing so. The tax should go as part of a wider review.
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Agreed Andrew. Does this government think it has just arrived in office with a blank sheet of paper? Here we are 16 months down the road with cuts that rise (how magical is that); plans for that don't grow, and red tape multiplying like amoebae. Andrew Tyrie is right. Many of us post the same thing month after month. Rome, fiddling and burning come readily to mind.
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Oh! There are not enough Party activists to win a general election. Don't forget Cameron did not win the last election despite an open goal. Anyone who thinks Boris is thick should try translating Latin and Greek at the level he does. We need someone to lead the party who understands complexity, not someone like Cameron who today according to the Daily Mail is worried about plastic bags.
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Like many I know in London, it would be a mega relief if Boris led the Conservative Party. We despair of the present leader. And once in charge Boris would rapidly lead the country: Boris' appeal crosses party lines. We are running into such global economic and political turmoil,that it would be a brave man who could forecast that the Coalition will still be here in 2015. Toby Young may find that his prediction comes true well before 2018. Does that affect his bet?
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"it is perfectly possible to make the case that it was politicians that are to blame for this crisis, not businesses." How true. Turn first to the Chinese government exporting with a deliberately undervalued currency. The scale of that is behind much the turmoils of the last decade. What happens now that bubble is bursting and the Chinese have not developed a domestic market? Add in cheap money in the US - government again - and Germany's reluctance to spend. One last point: why believe that more (government)regulation will improve matters? It usually makes things worse and will probably do so this time. But so much easier for this government, like Labour before it, to bash a banker today.
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Why all this emphasis on women? It should of course be the best person for the job irrespective of all the usual hang ups the liberal hand wringers introduce. And isnt it time to drop a referendum on the EU? Leaving is the only option now. Why have a vote to vote on whether to have a vote?
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Mr Shakespeare raises excellent points. A key problem is that this government (nor previous governments) has tried to make this country among the most competitive in the world. There has been too much concentration on overseas aid, wars of questionable value to Britain's interests, human rights, paying for Club Med and Eastern Europe. We need to refocus fast.
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Ken is a writer of fiction. But will the public pay money for it?
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As I am sure you know, fixed exchange rates, currently the euro and the Chinese imposition on the US, do not work. One dire outcome is turbulence. We have little room for economic manoeuvre in this country while we remain tied to the EU so it is as though Osborne were whistling in the wind.
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The world is heading into recession, probably deep recession. Yet Osborne says we have 6 week to save it. Really? This is as believable as all those cuts. This is economic governance by PR. Much is beyond Osborne's power to change but he could at least lay the groundwork for a highly competitive country well removed from the EU with its future of no growth, even decline, and inevitable political and social upheaval. Osborne shows no understanding of the economic horrors we face. One footnote to that: what is the point of suing the ECB over the City? The only way is out.
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Tim is right. I had cause to look into the Climate Change Committee: how much is that costing us? How much is the whole climate change mumbo jumbo costing us? The one plus is that as we head into the next recession pressure to cut this nonsense will reach boiling point.
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Boris won. Cameron did not. One of them connected with the voters.
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At speed and in short. Disconnected from business, the lifeblood of the country. Too willing to impose his values on other countries including by military action but not necessarily in our national interest. Espouses expensive green causes of doubtful validity. Pro EU.
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I had long thought Cameron was a closet LibDem. After the 2010 election he came out of the closet.
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Lindsay Jenkins added a favorite at THE FREEDOM ASSOCIATION
Sep 21, 2011
We are almost certainly heading into a global recession. On our on doorstep, within easy trading reach, we have the nightmare of euroland - fixed exchange rates creating dire economies. Riots so far have been limited largely to Greece and Spain; it will not stay that way. In the UK the property bubble has yet to burst: high mortgages benefiting from low interest rates. They will not always be low. This government should be doing everything in its power to make the UK highly competitive. Instead we have the mantra of "we are all in it together" so that top rate taxes cannot be cut. "Not fair" is a LibDem cry - it should not permeate every corner of Conservative policy to the detriment of business on which our very futures depend.
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What has happened to the Conservative Party? Andrew Bridgen writes a perfectly sensible and financially literate article and responders here rise up to back the LibDems. The LibDems are not the party of business: this country should be nourishing its entrepreneurial roots. That is what so many of us want to see from Cameron and Osborne, so far with little success and decreasing hope.
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Bruce, as usual you write with wit. Your 1500 words is however a re-write of history - fiction. Will the editors allow me 1500 words to reply? Meanwhile your first sentence suggests you might be edging towards an out position - can this be true? Or is it a case of clever writing?
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No woman I know thought it was funny. Cameron's behaviour reflects too many comments I have met over the years from men in business, usually when they know they are in top dog position.
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Is it not the case that Cameron is briefing against the civil service to cover his own, and his colleagues, failures?
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