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Anne Gracie
http://www.annegracie.com
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Thanks, Kareni, glad you enjoyed the post. As for the comments, it's my contention that we always have the best, most interesting and intelligent mini conversations in our comment stream. *g*
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on House Hunting at Word Wenches
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Annette, I think the web is an enticing rabbit-warren for most of us. I can spend hours wandering along, looking at stuff and sometimes completely lose track of whatever it was that I originally started out looking for. Things from the past are more enticing because we tend to paint the past with nostalgia and romance, I suspect. There's a reason why I write historical romance. It comes from the heart.
Toggle Commented Nov 10, 2018 on House Hunting at Word Wenches
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Leander, yes, I made very close use of Cook's Cottage. It was perfect. I remember my excitement when I visited it and thought, yes, that's where he knocks on her door and collapses, and this is when she drags him in. And I counted the steps she had to get him up, and realized he might bang his head on them . . . etc. So my vague, imaginary generic cottage became that specific one. There was a Japanese tour visiting at the time and they were most intrigued when I pulled out my tape measure and noted things down. Your archives sound fascinating.
Toggle Commented Nov 10, 2018 on House Hunting at Word Wenches
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Binnie, what a beautiful gatehouse. I would use it too if was remotely in my era. Thanks for your kind comments on my Virtuous Widow — and thanks for preordering Marry In Secret. The cover is not yet finalized, so that black placeholder cover they've used on websites like amazon is quite dramatic-looking, isn't it?
Toggle Commented Nov 10, 2018 on House Hunting at Word Wenches
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After I read the article you linked to I can see how tempting it might be. I loved this bit: "My photo “Earthrise” points out the beauty of Earth - and its fragility. That little atmospheric thing you and I are enjoying now is nothing more than the skin on an apple around the core." Beautiful. And prophetic, if you think about how we take the earth so much for granted as something to use and pillage.
Toggle Commented Nov 10, 2018 on House Hunting at Word Wenches
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It's one of the pleasures of modern, life, isn't it, Deborah — the fantasy that we could go and live in one of those houses. I'm forever having friends email with images of some glorious old house, saying, "How about here? All we need is for 10 of us to toss in half a million" because of course, we all have that kind of spare change floating around. LOL
Toggle Commented Nov 10, 2018 on House Hunting at Word Wenches
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Yay, you got the rhyme, Quantum. I wondered whether it would only be Brits and aussies who knew it. It's a strange thing, isn't it, to remove buildings from their native land and natural context and take them to the other side of the world and rebuild them. I think Cook's Cottage is the only example in Australia — at least that I know of. But people have been doing it for centuries, haven't they — Cleopatra's needle(s) lifted from Egypt and reerected in London, New York and Paris, and various Roman and Greek bits and pieces all over. The moon? Wow. All my claustrophobic instincts shiver at the idea. Show me the moon from a lovely drifting boat on a lake in the mountains and that's much more my style. Though I do confess that I wouldn't mind being cryogenically frozen for my next trip to the UK — as long as I'm guaranteed to wake up with all faculties intact.
Toggle Commented Nov 10, 2018 on House Hunting at Word Wenches
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Pamela, I think some writers are natural "landscape writers" and need to ground themselves in the place of the story. Wench Susanna clearly is, traveling to those locations for each book. I'm also a landscape writer, but the cost and time and discomfort of travel to the UK for me -- 26 hours sitting on a plane is not fun, and that's not counting the before and after bits waiting in airports -- makes it impractical for me. So we do what we can. Luckily I lived in the UK for a year as a child, and have made a number of trips there over the years. But each book is different, each location and set of characters have a different relationship to the story and usually I don't know what that will be until I'm writing it.
Toggle Commented Nov 10, 2018 on House Hunting at Word Wenches
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Sue, I love building imaginary places from bits and pieces. I'm better at that than I am at describing real details of actual places. Accurate reality ties me down too much — I'm much happier with images and snippets. I think it was Chekhov who advised writers “to seize upon the little par­tic­u­lars, group­ing them in such a way that, in read­ing, when you shut your eyes you get the picture.” I loved reading that, because it's a bit like how it works for me.
Toggle Commented Nov 10, 2018 on House Hunting at Word Wenches
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Annette, the gatehouse I mention in the new book (and it's really only a passing mention) is not as ornate as the one in the picture. I don't really describe it except to say something like "an ancient gatehouse of unusual design; two houses joined by an ornate arch." It's the person in the gatehouse that matters to the story, not the architecture—and he's a very minor character. Exploring gorgeous places via the web is such a lovely rabbit-hole. I'm hoping to go to the UK in a year or so —have other priorities here first — but there are too many places I want to visit. I suspect I ought to move there for a year or so. *g*
Toggle Commented Nov 10, 2018 on House Hunting at Word Wenches
1 reply
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Location scouting for my books is mostly done on line, with maps of the time (Richard Horwood's or William Faden's), images of stately homes, gorgeous nature blogs, and of course, with books. Continue reading
Posted Nov 8, 2018 at Word Wenches
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Annette, I have some Christmas favorite reads that I pull out every year, too. And I must admit, I did enjoy reading through this wenchly collection again. It's putting me in the mood for the holidays, even though I know it's a bit early. That pink dress is the one I based Allie's dress on, except for the color and lace and minus the train. Well, all right, it's not a bit like Allie's dress, but it IS the one that inspired hers.
Toggle Commented Nov 5, 2018 on Christmas snippets at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Sue. Yes, we wenches have enjoyed looking through our stories and pulling out an excerpt.
Toggle Commented Nov 5, 2018 on Christmas snippets at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Kareni, I'm glad you enjoyed it. And yes, that green dress is pretty, isn't it?
Toggle Commented Nov 5, 2018 on Christmas snippets at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Mary. The way people kept their clothes clean in those days is fascinating, actually. Their maids did the work, of course, but some of the techniques are bizarre by our standards — a lot of those fabrics weren't designed to be washed. I hope you enjoy our book.
Toggle Commented Nov 4, 2018 on Christmas snippets at Word Wenches
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Each Sunday in the lead-up to Christmas, we're putting up an excerpt from one of the stories in The Last Chance Christmas Ball. Today it's a little piece from Mistletoe Kisses. Continue reading
Posted Nov 3, 2018 at Word Wenches
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Wow, Kareni, as always a long and comprehensive list of books you've read. Thanks so much. I've made a note of some that intrigue me.
Toggle Commented Oct 31, 2018 on What We're Reading—October at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Donna, I think it was Mary Jo who recommended David Rosenfelt, and she's certainly enthused a few of us here. I've also bought the first Donna Andrews one and am hoping to become a fan.
Toggle Commented Oct 31, 2018 on What We're Reading—October at Word Wenches
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Mary, I do love a Christmas story. I haven't started my Christmas reading yet, but you might have inspired me. I've already bought some of the wenchly recommendations this month, including Susan's Rhys Bowen recommendation, but I might delay the Christmas reading a little. It's been ages since I read Mary Jo's One Perfect Rose and it might be the perfect time for a reread. Thanks.
Toggle Commented Oct 31, 2018 on What We're Reading—October at Word Wenches
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Sue the whole genealogy thing boggles my mind. I have a good friend in the US who is DEEP into it and the stuff she digs out is amazing. And you, with your 84 pages of genetic matches -- wow, is all I can say! There must be something in the air with the old Nora Roberts books — I've been rereading her Chesapeake Bay series.
Toggle Commented Oct 31, 2018 on What We're Reading—October at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Janice -- some varied and interesting reading there. It's been years since I read Cousin Kate, and it was never one of my faves, but it might be interesting to go back and have a reread. I hadn't heard that talk about it, but it bugs me when modern readers expect authors of the past to have a modern understanding of some issues. Thanks too for the E. A. Dineley recommendation. Sounds interesting.
Toggle Commented Oct 31, 2018 on What We're Reading—October at Word Wenches
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Anne here, hosting this month's What We're Reading post. As always there's a lovely range of books for all tastes. And just a reminder -- these are not promo posts; they're genuinely what we've read and enjoyed in the last month. We'll start with Pat, who says: I'm on a hunt for light-hearted, humorous, feel-good books these days, so I'm over the moon when I find one. 180 SECONDS by Jessica Park qualifies, even though I suspect it's probably called a New Adult romance since the protagonists are in college. But this isn’t about the normal trials and tribulations of... Continue reading
Posted Oct 30, 2018 at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Jeanne -- some of my friends in the US gather for a superbowl party, and they do sound very similar. As for time zones, heaps of people here get up in the middle of the night to watch the soccer finals in the UK or Europe. It's a bonding process, too, as heavy-eyed people talk about the game at work the next day, having had no sleep.
Toggle Commented Oct 11, 2018 on American pies & Australian football at Word Wenches
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Annette, books are my addiction too, but in my youth I was mad keen on sports. Was never much of a footballer, though, but I could toss a cricket ball far and fast and with great accuracy -- came from being the little sister who got to fetch and throw the ball from way out while the older kids and grownups did the fun stuff Half the people at this party are not huge football fans, but a good game will always suck you in and it's fun watching in a group, I agree.
Toggle Commented Oct 11, 2018 on American pies & Australian football at Word Wenches
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Sonya you are a baaaaad daughter, teasing your father like that. I think you should decide to barrack for Collingwood, taking on your family tradition. (I did.)
Toggle Commented Oct 11, 2018 on American pies & Australian football at Word Wenches
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