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Anne Gracie
http://www.annegracie.com
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Lovely post, Christina. I envy you and Nicola the ability to visit all these beautiful old places. We have some lovely houses in Australia — and you can see some of them in the Miss Fisher TV series and film — but none of them is old enough to use for my research. The exception is "Captain Cook's Cottage" which is a reassembled cottage owned by Captain Cook's parents, and sits in the middle of some public gardens in Melbourne. I was able to use it for a novella, but it's tiny and rather cramped. Gives you a good idea of how the ordinary people lived though. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cooks%27_Cottage
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on Inspirational Grandeur at Word Wenches
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Writing? Nah, I bet we'd be happily poking around that gorgeous house, finding all sorts of wonderful corners, and then grabbing others to "come and look at this!" And when we weren't, we'd be talking. *g*
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on Inspirational Grandeur at Word Wenches
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Great post, Mary Jo. I have a Dutch friend who often talks about how the Dutch national anthem pledges undying loyalty to the King of Spain. Kind of underlines how anthems come in at a particular time and then stay on long after their use-by date.
Toggle Commented Jul 3, 2020 on Anthems at Word Wenches
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I'm with you, Mary. That whole vote for an Australian National Anthem was, in my opinion, rushed through, and I don't believe most people looked any deeper than the title of the song. So they voted for a title. And then realized it started with "Australian sons let us rejoice" and then there was an outcry for it to be changed to Australians all. It's a shame these things are organized by politicians. The vote of whether to become a republic or not was scuttled by the then Prime Minister (a royalist) who effectively divided the vote by linking it to a presidential system nobody wanted. So a country where every survey under the sun showed a huge majority of people were in favour of Australia becoming a republic, ended up voting against it.
Toggle Commented Jul 3, 2020 on Anthems at Word Wenches
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"more about clothing, maybe carriages/transport, and games and/or entertainment" Mary, thanks so much for those suggestions. I've noted them down in my list of possible quiz topics. I'm glad you enjoyed it.
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Karin, I also learned all my Heyerish terms from reading in context, and I think you probably haven't misunderstood them at the time. I also work pretty hard in these quizzes to try to trick you. ( I probably should apologize for that but I won't *g* ) I'm very pleased you enjoy the quizzes. I will make more in the future, but I've run pretty low on the terms used by Heyer and others, so now am also looking things up in dictionaries of slang. Thanks.
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Thanks, Cathleen. I've used “cucumberish” before in one of these quizzes — it's such a great piece of slang, and the meaning so unlikely.
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I'm pleased you enjoyed it, Jane. Thanks for playing.
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Well done, Teresa — I think by now, with all the discussion of lobscouse in the comment stream, everyone will remember it forever! LOL
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Anna, according to some of the UK commenters here lobscouse is still eaten today in Liverpool and those who have eaten it find it delicious. The recipe they showed me, is not quite the same as the list of ingredients in the 1811 source that I used. Mine was a naval dish, and fresh ingredients weren't exactly a feature of sailing ship menus.
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Thanks for playing, Margot, and yes following your gut response is probably the best guide. Glad you enjoyed it.
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Thanks so much Constance —yes, coming up with the alternatives is the best part for me in making up these quizzes. I am, naturally, trying to trick you all with plausible-sounding possibilities. *g*
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Thanks, Lola, glad you enjoyed it.
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I'm so glad, Mary. I do enjoy making them up. Thanks.
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Glad you enjoyed it, Patricia. Lobscouse threw a lot of people.
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Vicki, half the fun for me is trying to come up sneaky misleading alternatives. But you did very well. Thanks for playing.
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Congratulations, Janet -- that's a great result.
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Thanks, Binnie, yes I had to avoid all suggestion of the carriage kind of squab. :) If you search for Quiz on the word wench site some of them should come up. Otherwise you can find them on my website and try not to look at the answers before you do the quiz.
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Thanks, Suzi — yes, Lobscouse flummoxed a lot of people.
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Thanks Kareni.
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Thanks, Kathy — glad you enjoyed it.
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Hi Joanna -- yes, according to some of the commenters here, it is the origin of "scousers". I got it from Grose's 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue -- who called it "a dish much eaten at sea" and gave the ingredients.
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LOL Cheryl. I think it's be fun. And slang everywhere is tricky for visitors.
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Thanks for that link, Lynne
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Lynne, my source was Grose's 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue -- who called it "a dish much eaten at sea" — and in that case "biscuits" would refer to ships biscuits, not the sort of biscuit we eat today with a cuppa. My guess is that dumplings came in when fresher ingredients were to hand — ie on land — and given that many old references to sea biscuits are also often accompanied by the adjective "weevilly" it's not hard to see why dumplings would be preferred in the land version.
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