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Anne Gracie
http://www.annegracie.com
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LOL Annette — I've had friends tell me that's how I'll die, too -- under a pile of books.
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on What We're Reading: February at Word Wenches
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Thanks for this recommendation, Malvina. I always like your recommendations. I'll be buying this as soon as my new credit card comes through. (The old one got compromised. grrr)
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on What We're Reading: February at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Alyce. I also like finding new-to-me good authors.
Toggle Commented 6 days ago on Historicals are dead? at Word Wenches
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Alyce I think Golden Urchin is by Madeleine Brent, one of my favorite writers. https://www.amazon.com/Golden-Urchin-Madeleine-Brent/dp/0285641646/
Toggle Commented 6 days ago on Historicals are dead? at Word Wenches
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Thanks for this recommendation, Patricia. I shall investigate Julie McElwaine.
Toggle Commented Feb 20, 2021 on Historicals are dead? at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Annette. Yes, I think one needs to me a little tolerant of small historical glitches — I've made a few myself, even though I try to get things right. But I suspect all readers have their cut-off line in that respect — the things we will tolerate and those that will make us give up on a book, and maybe an author. As for rereading, I do a lot of that anyway.
Toggle Commented Feb 20, 2021 on Historicals are dead? at Word Wenches
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Yes Karen, the boom in self published books has meant a lot more historicals are available, including some of the oldie-but-goodie out of print ones, like those trad regencies. Authors like Mimi Matthews started that way and now she's with my publisher, Berkley. I recommended one of her books on a WWR post way back. *g*
Toggle Commented Feb 20, 2021 on Historicals are dead? at Word Wenches
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Thanks for those recommendations, Teresa. I will try Lady of Hay. I'm always on the lookout for good, new-to-me authors. I haven't read or watched Belgravia yet, but I believe it was written by the same man who wrote Downton Abbey.
Toggle Commented Feb 20, 2021 on Historicals are dead? at Word Wenches
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Pat, all I need is your name on the cover and I'm sold! Looking forward to reading this contemporary mystery. Sounds like a lot of fun
Toggle Commented Feb 19, 2021 on Apotropaic Magic Needed at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Kareni - probably one of the few situations where stubbornness is a good thing. *g*
Toggle Commented Feb 19, 2021 on Historicals are dead? at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Misti — I haven't yet seen Miss Scarlet and the Duke, but I've heard good things about it. As for faro's Daughter, that's one of my faves and I agree it would make a fabulous movie or TV series. I've started rereading my Heyers, and recently read The Talisman Ring, which wasn't a favorite when I was young, but this time around I loved it and was in awe of her clever, sparkling dialogue.
Toggle Commented Feb 19, 2021 on Historicals are dead? at Word Wenches
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" I ask for well-written, character driven books above all else" Sue I couldn't agree more. I read in a wide range of genres and this is what the books I love all have in common. I can't help you with the Canadian stories, but maybe if you told me what you recall about the Australian outback stories I might know some. I don't like true crime either, though I read a lot of crime fiction. I have several crime recommendations coming up at the end of the month.
Toggle Commented Feb 19, 2021 on Historicals are dead? at Word Wenches
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Do you know, I've never read Barbara Erskine, but I've lapped up time-slips for ages, and gobbled up yours and Nicola's and Susanna Kearsley's. And Pamela Hartshorne's. There are probably others I've forgotten to mention, and I expect names will keep jumping up at me for the rest of the day. I loved your straight historicals too, and recommended them numerous times on our monthly WWR posts. :)
Toggle Commented Feb 19, 2021 on Historicals are dead? at Word Wenches
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Mary, I couldn't agree with you more. Lets move on from endless Austen remakes and film some Heyers. I think one of the reasons they haven't been made is because Heyer approved the making of The Reluctant Widow, but if you've seen it, you'll see how the film makers had no idea, and it's soooooo wrong. So after that she said no to everything, I think. Jen Kloester would know. I'll ask her. And yes, Bridgerton is bringing so many more people to the historical romance genre, and yay for that!
Toggle Commented Feb 19, 2021 on Historicals are dead? at Word Wenches
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Aw, aren't you lovely? Thanks so much
Toggle Commented Feb 19, 2021 on Historicals are dead? at Word Wenches
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Sonya, I agree, there's so much to the Victorian era, but that editor couldn't see it. (She also wouldn't let me write Australian-set historicals because "Australia only has gold and convicts and we've done them." And yet the book I'd proposed had nothing to do with either.) Your new book sounds fascinating! Keep us posted.
Toggle Commented Feb 19, 2021 on Historicals are dead? at Word Wenches
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Love your weather analogy, Quantum. Melbourne is also very weather conscious as we're known for "four seasons in one day" so the weather is always a useful source of conversational starters. *g* I agree, those Austen productions are excellent — but there are still points of difference to debate — I still roll my eyes at that pig wandering through the Bennets' home in the Keira Knightly version. If you do watch the Bridgerton production, I'd be interested to hear what you thought. Some Bridgerton fans love it, others are outraged by how it differs from the book. I think all screen adaptations are bound to be different. For a start books have a lot of people thinking and pondering, and that can't be shown on a screen.
Toggle Commented Feb 19, 2021 on Historicals are dead? at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Margaret. I think a lot of people who don't read historicals imagine that they must be like history books, or history lessons at school Instead they're just stories in a different setting.
Toggle Commented Feb 19, 2021 on Historicals are dead? at Word Wenches
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Anne here. Late last year a new writer asked me about the market for historicals. She'd been told that historicals were passé, that nobody smart was writing them any more. (The timing of the question is significant, because things have changed since then. But more of that later.) It's not a new idea. When I first started writing historical romance, so many people warned me off the idea. "Historicals are dead," they told me confidently. "Nobody's buying them any more, not publishers, not readers." I found that hard to believe. I've always loved historicals of all kinds — not just... Continue reading
Posted Feb 18, 2021 at Word Wenches
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I dunno, Pat, from everything I've read the fae are scary, untrustworthy, and have little regard for we humans. I'd be verrrrry cautious. And, as Kareni pointed out, the food is bound to be enspelled and we could be stuck there for years
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What fun, Sonya. I bet your night time picnics were enhanced by the illicit entry, as well.
Toggle Commented Feb 5, 2021 on Garden Squares in London at Word Wenches
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Oh Margaret, I hear you on the weeding thing! Watering is fine, but weeding. Mine grow so fast and I'm ashamed to say that I've let them go this year, telling myself that it will all be wrecked anyway by my renovations, and I'll start again. I remember when I had a new roof put on, umpteen years ago, and I showed the roofers the plants to be careful of. They assured me they'd take care, and I headed off to work. Got home to find the ladder to the roof had been placed right behind a precious and beloved azalea — which I had showed them! —that was about to bloom. The azalea was now just a trampled mess of sticks and leaves. They'd placed the ladder right where their big builders' boots would step off it, directly onto my lovely plant. (Hold a grudge still? Me? LOL )
Toggle Commented Feb 4, 2021 on Garden Squares in London at Word Wenches
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Ooh, Constance, I'm off to research The Lost Gardens of Heligan. Thank you. What a lovely story. And such a sad journal. So many young men lost, and for what? There is a novel by Kate Morton called The Forgotten garden, which is a lovely read. I love stories about gardens' especially secret or lost gardens. Partly that's because of The Secret Garden, which I read as a child, but also because I had my own secret garden experience when I was a child and went to Scotland for a year. We arrived in the middle of a very bitter winter and the garden of our house was all frozen, hard-packed snow, with a few sad-looking twigs poking out of it. I couldn't believe anything could survive that. But it did, and it was like a miracle to me, aged 8. Best of luck with your NSW Christmas bush. Keep me posted.
Toggle Commented Feb 4, 2021 on Garden Squares in London at Word Wenches
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How interesting that you picnicked in a cemetery, Annette. When I was a student I lived half a block from the Melbourne General cemetery, which is an old historical cemetery full of fascinating headstones and peaceful corners. I used to ride my bike to Uni through it, and also walk my dog there. It certainly taught me that a a cemetery could be a peaceful and lovely place. Also I have Macedonian friends, and have been so a number of funerals, and one of their rituals is to eat together near the grave after the funeral, and on several dates months afterward. Such a friendly thing to do. It's hard to lose a garden you've nurtured from the start. A friend of mine has moved into a lovely apartment, but misses her glorious old garden. I've also started keeping pot plants again. If you ever get to visit Melbourne, you'll see that the people who planned this city (Victorian era) included plenty of gardens and green space. There's actually more in the centre of the city than there is in the suburbs, where much of the later development was left to speculators who wanted to sell and build on every spare inch. Short sightedness and greed.
Toggle Commented Feb 4, 2021 on Garden Squares in London at Word Wenches
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Hi Maggie, I recently watched Monty Don's French Garden series, which was fascinating. Can't wait for the Secret History of the British Garden. I just looked up the Painswick Rococo Gardens — they look gorgeous. Quantum mentioned the charming follies there, and I immediately added it to my list. I love follies and quirky little buildings. I have a vague plan to have one in my own little garden -- something part quirky folly and part practical garden shed. :) The original dilapidated old shed that had to be pulled down (before it fell down) had a big arched window, which has inspired my current fantasy shed.
Toggle Commented Feb 4, 2021 on Garden Squares in London at Word Wenches
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