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Anne Gracie
http://www.annegracie.com
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Constance, I haven't read the "Shetland" books, but will hunt them down. And Victoria is showing here at the moment, but I haven't watched it yet. " I think Ballarat looks beautiful in Dr. Blake; I especially love the styles of the houses and wonder if that bungalow-type is common there? " Yes, the majority of houses in Australia are single story and what you'd probably call bungalows. We don't describe one story houses as "bungalows" -- for me a 'bungalow" was a cheaply constructed small structure out the back of a house that was extra living space or used for storage, perhaps — sometimes also called a "sleep-out" and used in the hot summer weather, because they cooled down quickly at night. I remember a very funny conversation years ago with some English friends, who asked me about the sort of house I lived in. I described it, and they nodded and said "Oh, a bungalow." "No." I said (feeling quite indignant) "It's a proper house!" LOL Partly it's because we have lots of space here — suburban house blocks were traditionally a quarter of an acre, and also the climate — heating is not such a big issue, but cooling can be, so houses with verandas and hallways through which cool air could flow were common. In Queensland, houses were built on stilts to assist the air circulation — called "Queenslanders" they're beautiful houses. If you do a google image search for "queenslander houses" you'll see that although they're raised quite high off the ground, they're still pretty much one story houses. Two (or more) story houses have become more common in the last few decades but before that, you really only found them in the inner city -- and they were usually Victorian-era terrace houses. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terraced_houses_in_Australia
Toggle Commented yesterday on AAW — Films and TV shows at Word Wenches
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Cynthia, I'm also a huge fan of Foyle's War, as are several other wenches. Scott and Bailey is another show I really enjoy and I used to enjoy New Tricks before it got silly, after the original actors left. I particularly loved Amanda Redmond in that show. If you enjoyed Rake, you might keep an eye out for Jack Irish, an Australian crime series. A few you mentioned are new to me, so thanks for the recommendations.
Toggle Commented yesterday on AAW — Films and TV shows at Word Wenches
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Thanks for those suggestions, Annette. I can see I'll have to chase up Brokenwood. And that travel series sounds very pleasant.
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on AAW — Films and TV shows at Word Wenches
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Teresa, yes, Endeavour can be a bit of a prig, but I found Inspector Morse that way too. As I said above, my fave of the More spinoffs is Inspector Lewis, with Lewis and Hathaway. And call the Midwife is wonderful, I agree.
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on AAW — Films and TV shows at Word Wenches
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Mary, a good comedy is a joy forever. I have a particular fondness for British comedies like Black Books and others. And Seinfeld is always fun. I haven't seen Modern Family, so will have to chase it down.
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on AAW — Films and TV shows at Word Wenches
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You certainly do love your crime shows, Binnie. Thanks for all those suggestions. The Dr. Blake mysteries frustrate me a little -- noy because of the content or the acting, but because of the sepia tone that prevails. It's filmed in Ballarat, in my state, and it's such a pretty city, but in the series it always looks a bit gloomy.
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on AAW — Films and TV shows at Word Wenches
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LOL Sue, my favorite of the Morse series and spin-offs is the Lewis and Hathaway series — Inspector Lewis, with More's old sidekick and his new you young off-sider.
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on AAW — Films and TV shows at Word Wenches
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Thanks for the suggestions, Janice. My little film group usually has a meal together after the movie, so it's a nicely social occasion, and the discussion is always interesting, as we're all writers and have Opinions.
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on AAW — Films and TV shows at Word Wenches
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Lilian that sounds wonderful. What a shame they're going to be hard to get. I love foreign films and Tv, so often they give us a very different view of a culture. We are fortunate here in that we have a free-to-air TV station that shows a lot of foreign TV and movies.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on AAW — Films and TV shows at Word Wenches
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Kareni, to submit an AAW question, send it to Thanks for sharing your recommendations. I haven't seen either of those, though The martian is on my TBR pile of books.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on AAW — Films and TV shows at Word Wenches
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Marianne, I read the whole series when the books first came out, and I've seen the first of the TV series. I really enjoyed it.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on AAW — Films and TV shows at Word Wenches
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Anne here for this month's Ask A Wench, and the question of the moment is, "What movies or TV shows have you enjoyed lately?" We start with Pat. I record TV and never know how long the shows have been in the DVR. Looking at the list of unwatched programs, I’d say I have apparently stopped watching most regular TV. I used to love Modern Family until it got stale. Elementary has good and bad years, depending on the writers. The Good Place is still watchable, but they’re pushing their limits. So lately we’ve been streaming a few shows. Dietland... Continue reading
Posted 4 days ago at Word Wenches
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Wonderful blog, Nicola. I've always wanted to see the Northern Lights. And these photos are stunning.
Toggle Commented Feb 8, 2019 on The Northern Lights! at Word Wenches
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Ooh, Matilda and the Matches -- pretty close to Malvina and the Matches, isn't it? *g* And you're right to be careful of candles around the house. A friend of mine used to light candles and put them everywhere . . . until she set fire to her curtains one night. Could have been a disaster, but luckily it was only a mishap. I hadn't realized the Der Struwwelpeter stories had been incorporated into the Coles Funny Picture Books. I never had them growing up, but I do have an old copy of one I bought secondhand some years ago.
Toggle Commented Feb 7, 2019 on Cautionary Tales at Word Wenches
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Karin, the boy who cried wolf is a good sort of cautionary tale, I think. And I loved the music of Peter and the Wolf — my mother had a record of it, and we often played it. Your comment prompted me to go looking on the web for it and I found this delightful version, with an intro of the various characters/instruments by the conductor. Thanks for the reminder. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MfM7Y9Pcdzw
Toggle Commented Feb 7, 2019 on Cautionary Tales at Word Wenches
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Lucy, the thing that most disturbed me about the tomboy tale was that her gender was changed quietly in the night, and also in the night, she was SOLD to the ship's captain, also in the night -- both of which suggest to me that it was without her consent. The greedy little girl story is the kind of cautionary tale that I approve of. Gentle morals are fine. It's the really nasty, gory and brutal ones I loathe.
Toggle Commented Feb 7, 2019 on Cautionary Tales at Word Wenches
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Thanks for that link, Pat. I was very young when I learnt the poem -- I expect my parents and older siblings recited it often enough that it stuck, so the song is a new one to me. But Melanie Safka put another AA Milne poem to music - Alexander Beetle -- and I didn't already know it by heart, so I didn't mind the musical version . https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BRSq5bWu8x8
Toggle Commented Feb 6, 2019 on Cautionary Tales at Word Wenches
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That's a fun one -- thanks, Kareni
Toggle Commented Feb 5, 2019 on Cautionary Tales at Word Wenches
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Lillian, those tales were popular long before Danny Kaye. And I do think a lot of children quite enjoy scary, grisly stories. Just not me
Toggle Commented Feb 5, 2019 on Cautionary Tales at Word Wenches
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PS Quantum, I know you love your audio books. Have you seen the list of finalists in the "Audies"? https://www.audiofilemagazine.com/audies/
Toggle Commented Feb 4, 2019 on Cautionary Tales at Word Wenches
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I grew up with Dr Foster, too, and always wondered about that enormously deep puddle. I suppose it was a warning against that perennial childhood delight of jumping into puddles. But when I wrote the quiz for the pronunciation of some English place names I wondered if it was also a way of teaching people that Gloucester wasn't pronounced Gloo-ses-ter but Gloster. Speaking of childhood delights with puddles -- have you seen this delightful video of a little kid and the joy of puddledom? Makes me smile every time. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PN-MjUC4f9k
Toggle Commented Feb 4, 2019 on Cautionary Tales at Word Wenches
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Sue, I love "Disobedience" -- particularly the bit "King John put up a notice, LOST, STOLEN or STRAYED, James James Morrison's mother seems to have been mislaid. Last seen wandering vaguely, quite of her own accord. She went right down to the end of the town. Forty shillings reward." So charming and funny, I agree.
Toggle Commented Feb 4, 2019 on Cautionary Tales at Word Wenches
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Lillian, that Hans Christian Andersen was a pretty gory fellow, wasn't he? He wrote The Red Shoes, which still upsets me and makes me angry. A little girl horribly tortured for the crime of wanting pretty shoes. And every time I see that beautiful statue of the Little Mermaid I shiver. Bah humbug to him, say I.
Toggle Commented Feb 4, 2019 on Cautionary Tales at Word Wenches
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Mary what a great song. I've never heard it, but I'm off now to chase it up. As for texting and driving . . . yes, I see it all the time. Crazy stuff. Thanks for joining in the conversation.
Toggle Commented Feb 4, 2019 on Cautionary Tales at Word Wenches
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Anne here, pondering the notion of cautionary tales. Cautionary tales are those which warn people against performing some kind of forbidden act or doing something dangerous. The focus of the tale then ignores this prohibition and as a result suffers some dreadful, often grisly fate. Cautionary tales have been with us for centuries — King Midas, anyone? But mostly they seem to me to be aimed at women and children. So many folk songs warn naiive maidens against opportunistic men, often soldiers. Don't for heaven's sake give them your grandad's clothing (Oh, soldier soldier won't you marry me, with your... Continue reading
Posted Feb 3, 2019 at Word Wenches
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