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Anne Gracie
http://www.annegracie.com
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Janet, when I discover a writer whose books I love I can't help but try to share the recommendations around, so it's my pleasure to share. As for historical education -- most of my formal Australian history studies ended at Australian Federation (1901). But all my life I've been a reader, and I never made any distinction between historical stories, fantasy lands and contemporary stories, and so through reading fiction I've picked up a lot of history. When I read A Few Right Thinking Men, it was an eye-opener. I knew very little about that period and Sulari made it come alive for me.
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on Meet Sulari Gentill at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Janice — I love that Samuel Goldwyn quote. I'd heard it before but couldn't remember who said it. And an author hitting me over the head with their themes )often messages) is usually enough to put me off. On the other hand, Stephen King said something like he often doesn't know his theme until three quarters of the way through the draft, but by the time he goes to revise he really needs to know it. Which is interesting. I ran a workshop recently on themes, and looked up web /reviewers views on the main themes for Liane Moriarty's Big Little Lies, and the variation of interpretations was fascinating. Thanks for joining in the conversation.
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on Ask A Wench—October 2019 at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Danielle -- I think you'll enjoy them.
Toggle Commented 3 days ago on Meet Sulari Gentill at Word Wenches
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I know, Pat -- the Hugo Boss one surprised me. I did love the lurking fan in the cafe -- who I knew from Love in the Cold Climate.
Toggle Commented 3 days ago on Meet Sulari Gentill at Word Wenches
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Quantum, yes, each of the chapters in Sulari's books begins with a short clipping from the news or a magazine or something from the time, so I'm guessing that's what you heard. Not quite the flavour of the story you were after, I guess. As for the current political climate -- US, UK or Australia -- it's very depressing.
Toggle Commented 3 days ago on Meet Sulari Gentill at Word Wenches
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Deb, you've probably worked out that that reply was from Sulari, not me. Typepad is being difficult. :(
Toggle Commented 3 days ago on Meet Sulari Gentill at Word Wenches
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Happy to be of assistance Deb! Jock and Em are both terrific writers, as is Robert. There will be a lot of shop talk on this tour I expect.WarmlySulari
Toggle Commented 3 days ago on Meet Sulari Gentill at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Helen. As a sydneysider yourself, I think you'd really find the first book an eye-opener, as well as a cracking good read. So many things I didn't know about that period in NSW.
Toggle Commented 3 days ago on Meet Sulari Gentill at Word Wenches
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Anne here, and today I'm interviewing Sulari Gentill, an Australian writer who writes excellent historical crime novels, set in the 1930's, with absolutely gorgeous covers, similar to travel posters of the times. Some of you might remember that I recommended Sulari's books back in April. Now she and a small group of other Australian crime writers are about to tour the USA and I thought I'd ask Sulari a few questions about her series. Anne: Sulari, where did the original inspiration for a crime series set in the 1930's come from? Sulari: Writing can be quite an isolating obsession. I... Continue reading
Posted 4 days ago at Word Wenches
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Quantum, I'm a big fan of underdog stories — I suspect that's one of the things I explore quite frequently. I like your idea of us being somewhere between a blacksmith and a word-whisperer — I certainly have days when I'm banging out the words and days when they just flow. All jokes aside, it's an interesting idea. Thanks.
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on Ask A Wench—October 2019 at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Patricia -- it's interesting the things that throw you out of a story. A heroine I dislike, for instance is likely to lead to a DNF (did not finish). And a hero who is a bully the same — even though heroes often reform by the end of a book, I tend to think "once a bully always a bully."
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on Ask A Wench—October 2019 at Word Wenches
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Mary, yes, I think a worthy underlying theme can add a richness and depth to a story. I'm interested in your notion of an author's better nature coming through in fiction. I suspect that might also be something to do with the thing they call "voice" in writers.
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on Ask A Wench—October 2019 at Word Wenches
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"I used to hate dissecting stories in English or Literature class in school. Looking back, it could have been because the themes in those books did not appeal to me." Annette, I think this was probably true for me, too. I hated dissecting novels for "theme" -- it always felt a bit false, and I think you're right -- the themes we discussed were never ones I liked. I think there was also a suggestion that the author was "sending us a message" of sorts, and that I rejected utterly. I contended then that the author was writing the best story they could, and we were just reading things into it. Which is still true, I think, only now it's me reading things into my own work. LOL
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on Ask A Wench—October 2019 at Word Wenches
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Yes indeed, Theo, and my lovely American reader did exactly that. :) And I have to say, once it was pointed out to me, I've been conscious of themes popping up ever since. Thank you.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on Ask A Wench—October 2019 at Word Wenches
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LOL Kareni. When I was at university the question "what themes are the writer exploring" was never my favorite question. I'm much happier with the idea of our subconscious driving it, not a writer consciously "theming" along. *g*
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on Ask A Wench—October 2019 at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Sue — I agree that characterization, motivation and storytelling is vital. I usually notice themes either when I'm almost finished a story or when I'm about to revise. I also think too heavy-handed awareness of "theme" can spoil an otherwise good book.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on Ask A Wench—October 2019 at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Mary -- I do enjoy action when it's also tied to character development ot there are plot reasons for it. Action for action's sake is not very involving to me, though good writers can always suck me in.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on Ask A Wench—October 2019 at Word Wenches
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Yes, Mary Jo, isn't it lovely how our subconscious takes care of these things? I think it was Jayne Ann Krentz (aka Amanda Quick who wrote about our "core story" in which we continue to explore certain things — possibly themes — from different angles. That was in the collection of essays "Dangerous Men and Adventurous Women"
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on Ask A Wench—October 2019 at Word Wenches
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Anne here, wishing all our Canadian friends a Happy Thanksgiving, or Joyeux Action de Graces. (photo Ruth P. Peterkin - Fotolia) I'm also hosting our monthly "Ask a Wench" feature, and this month the question we're responding to is: "Do you have any particular subjects or themes you often return to in your novels?" Pat here: I do not set out to write themes, but if a reviewer asks me for the theme of my newest release, after some consideration, I’ll almost always say it’s a search for justice. And yes, I include the fight against prejudice under that heading,... Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at Word Wenches
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Sue, I think you've inspired me to reread the Pern stories. It's been ages since I read them, and I do enjoy a good reread. I've just done a reread of Lois McMaster Bujold's Vorkosigan books and thoroughly enjoyed them all over again.
Toggle Commented Oct 2, 2019 on What We're Reading at Word Wenches
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I'm another Emily Larkin fan, Quantum. She's also written some very good fantasy books under the name of Emily Gee. And now you've read her, you might be interested in this interview with her. https://wordwenches.typepad.com/word_wenches/2016/11/meet-emily-larkin.html?
Toggle Commented Oct 2, 2019 on What We're Reading at Word Wenches
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Mary Jo Putney talks about her new book, ONCE A SPY which is getting some lovely —and well deserved — reviews. Publisher's Weekly said: "Putney’s dramatic historical is filled with scintillating romance and tense danger." Continue reading
Posted Sep 25, 2019 at Word Wenches
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Beverly, the wenches are on Twitter, so you could follow us on @wordwenches8 -- and then retweet our tweets. *g*
Toggle Commented Sep 20, 2019 on Cats and Writers, with examples at Word Wenches
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Sonya, I, too travel with a change of clothes and some basic necessities in my carry-on, as well as my computer, writing notebook., kindle etc. Being stuck for 24 hours in Hong Kong on the way to Europe some years ago taught me that.
Toggle Commented Sep 16, 2019 on Travel Tips and Pitfalls to Avoid at Word Wenches
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How annoying that you can't get in to type-pad, Pat, but I'm very interested to see that when you reply to the email notifications (instead of logging in to the site) you lose apostrophes, too. That happens to me as well -- so many of my comments have no apostrophes. I used to go in and edit them to fix it, but it became too time consuming.
Toggle Commented Sep 15, 2019 on Travel Tips and Pitfalls to Avoid at Word Wenches
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