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Anne Gracie
http://www.annegracie.com
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And what about being named after the Battle of the Bulge? LOL
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on Battle Babies! at Word Wenches
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Lovely post, Christina, and I have many of the same keepers on my shelves as yours as well as so many of the authors listed in the comments stream. I also need to cull my books but usually what happens when I start, I have to glance inside the book to refresh my memory and decide whether it stays or goes, and after a hard day's work when I've ended up reading a whole three books and thrown out none, I retire to bed . . . to read. LOL
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on What's on your Keeper Shelf? at Word Wenches
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Sounds like he might have been named around the Peace of Amiens — which, sadly was quite short lived. Great post Nicola. So interesting, and something I didn't know about, either. I don't know if I could have forgiven a parent who called me Heligoland or Loos! ;)
Toggle Commented 6 days ago on Battle Babies! at Word Wenches
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Fab post, Mary Jo. I've written all my life — letters, silly poems (that I called pomes), short stories etc, and like you, it never occurred to me to write books, because that was for these strange, rare and wonderful creatures that lived in a magic land — or something. Until I started working with a guy who was a published writer, and I thought Huh! Not a unicorn. *g* So I started seriously writing for publication but I never called myself 'a writer' until I was published, because a writer is a job, not just an activity. After all, I clean and garden and cook, but I don't call myself a cleaner or a gardener or a cook. And I still teach people things occasionally, but it's no longer my job so I don't call myself a teacher any more. But the description is a personal choice — I don't care what other people call themselves.
Toggle Commented Oct 19, 2020 on Magic Moments` at Word Wenches
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I appreciate your difficulties, Pat. It's a fine line to walk, grounding it in the realities of the time and also convincing modern readers, and then there's the paranormal element. I once wrote a book where a minor-but significant for the plot character was believed to be dying — and his last wishes helped drive the plot. I consulted a doctor friend who came up with the perfect condition for my needs. In my book the doctor he consulted bled and purged him relentlessly, and he got weaker and weaker until eventually the heroine and his daughter intervened and said "enough" and dismissed the doctor. He was then tended by a healer/midwife, and his condition improved (along the lines my real doctor friend had told me it would.) But some readers were outraged that the heroine had the arrogance to set herself above a doctor and to turn to an untrained local woman, and didn't believe the cure. Even though the medical treatment of the time was not only ineffective but incredibly debilitating, they still insisted the doctor must be right. So, the message is, you can't please everyone. (g)
Toggle Commented Oct 16, 2020 on WRITING CLOWN SUITS at Word Wenches
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Sue, it's not really a superstition, but more a habit from childhood, like yours, but I always try not to step on the lines of a footpath. It comes from having AA Milne read to me as a child — Lines and Squares. "Whenever I walk in a London street I'm ever so careful to watch my feet . . . " https://allpoetry.com/Lines-And-Squares
Toggle Commented Oct 15, 2020 on The Writer's Lucky Charm at Word Wenches
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Anne here. Thanks again, Alison for visiting the Word Wenches, and thank you to all those who've left a comment. Alison has made a random pick for her winner (she couldn't choose — said it was like choosing a favorite child!), and Sally F has been contacted.
Toggle Commented Oct 13, 2020 on Meet Alison Stuart at Word Wenches
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Christina, when my parents lived in Penang (Malaysia) there were so many lovely old buildings, from the beautiful wooden houses in the traditional kampongs (villages) to lovely big old colonial era buildings. I'm almost reluctant to go back now, imagining how they've mostly been razed in favour of modern concrete things.
Toggle Commented Oct 10, 2020 on Meet Alison Stuart at Word Wenches
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Anne here, introducing Alison Stuart, a fellow Australian writer and a former President and lifetime member of RWAustralia. After publishing a number of historicals in a variety of time periods and settings, Alison has recently branched into two new areas; Australian set historicals published by Harlequin Mira (Australia) and, as A.M. Stuart, two historical crime novels set in 1910 Singapore, published by Berkley USA. Anne: Alison, after writing historical romance and historical novels, what drew you to writing historical crime? Alison: Thank you so much for inviting me to join the wonderful Word Wenches, particularly as the answer to your... Continue reading
Posted Oct 8, 2020 at Word Wenches
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Lovely post, Christina. I don't buy magazines for my house fix, and I live too far away to be able to pop into some of the great houses of the UK or Europe — I trawl the web. For every book, I find a house for my characters to live in. Sometimes it's just one house but sometimes it's a combination of features from several houses. And often I'll also add in the countryside around them. I used to print them off and make collages out of them, but these days I mainly just keep them in a digital file.
Toggle Commented Oct 5, 2020 on Authorly Curiosity at Word Wenches
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Nice interview, Helen and Nicola — thanks. I've just bought Harold — it sounds fascinating. I love alternative interpretations of history. I once saw a marvellous documentary about the Roman invasion of Wales, and it was a debate between two historians, one taking a pro-Roman view and the other the Welsh. The Roman historian would present his view of what happened, along with gorgeous reenactments, and then the Welsh historian would say "Absolute rubbish! This is what really happened." And it too would be reenacted. It was a brilliant illustration of how the same sources could be interpreted so differently. It's interesting how some periods become popular and others don't. When I was a kid I devoured books by Henry Treece, who set his novels in all kinds of — I won't say unknown periods, but certainly they were much less visited in fiction. Some of his books have been republished as e-books and I've bought them and am planning to reread them.
Toggle Commented Oct 2, 2020 on Meet Wench Guest - Helen Hollick! at Word Wenches
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Susan, it was in reference to one of the books I mentioned above: Murder at Melrose Court, a 1920's set country house murder mystery, the first in a series by Karen Menuhin. There's a link to it in the post. The main character, Heathcliff Lennox hates being called Heathcliff and prefers to be addressed as Lennox. The author is interesting, too, I think. She started writing when she turned 60, and she's the daughter-in-law of Yehudi Menuhin.
Toggle Commented Oct 2, 2020 on What We're Reading--September 2020 at Word Wenches
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Annette, I think I picked them up from a wenchly reader comment — I often do, but by the time I get around to reading them I've forgotten who recommended them. I did love Heathcliff, and had several chuckles when he's taking about names like Hiram, and saying, "What sort of a name is that? Who names their child that?" LOL
Toggle Commented Oct 1, 2020 on What We're Reading--September 2020 at Word Wenches
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Oh Culloden, so heartbreaking, and it still moves us all those years later. I remember when I was about fifteen discovering one of my dad's books by John Prebble, who wrote extensively and beautifully about Scottish history. I lay on the floor (my fave spot for reading) weeping through his book CULLODEN. I did the same thing with his book THE HIGHLAND CLEARANCES — devastating but wonderful. So often these tragedies are lost, covered up, blurred from history, but these books honour the people who were so ruthlessly ousted from their traditional homes.
Toggle Commented Oct 1, 2020 on What We're Reading--September 2020 at Word Wenches
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I'm off to buy the Jo Jo Moyes book, too — hadn't heard of it. Thanks for the rec. She's a fabulous writer. As for Stephanie Laurens — yes, phew, (fans self re her love scenes! ) My fave of hers is Devil's Bride.
Toggle Commented Oct 1, 2020 on What We're Reading--September 2020 at Word Wenches
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Thanks for your very kind words about my books, Vicki. While you're waiting for the new Miss Fisher book, can I recommend Kerry Greenwood's "Corinna" books. Corinna is a baker whose bakery shop is in the heart of the laneways are in central Melbourne. They're less well known than her Phrynne books, but I like them a lot more. And isn't Jennifer Ashley wonderful? And so prolific!
Toggle Commented Oct 1, 2020 on What We're Reading--September 2020 at Word Wenches
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Hi Isabel, yes it's US time, sorry. I posted the interview at 4.40pm Aussie time, so that it'd be up ready for the UK and US Monday morning. It's up now, so just click on this link to read it. https://wordwenches.typepad.com/word_wenches/2020/09/once-dishonored-interview-putney.html
Toggle Commented Sep 28, 2020 on Interview Tomorrow at Word Wenches
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Anne here, and today I'm interviewing Mary Jo Putney about her new book, ONCE DISHONORED which is OUT TOMORROW! I've read it twice now and thoroughly enjoyed it both times. It's also garnered some lovely reviews. Library Journal gave it a coveted starred review, and gave it this verdict: "In her own signature style, paying impeccable attention to period details, Putney continues to vindicate the honor of scoundrels in this fifth entry of the stunning “Rogues Redeemed” series (after Once a Spy). Fans of historicals will root for our brave, intelligent heroine and the hero who stands beside her." Publisher's... Continue reading
Posted Sep 27, 2020 at Word Wenches
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Anne here, flying in with a quick Sunday announcement. Tomorrow (Monday) I'll be interviewing Mary Jo Putney about her new book, ONCE DISHONORED which goes on sale on Tuesday. I've read it twice, and it's a cracker of a read. Mary Jo is also giving away a copy to someone who leaves a comment, so don't forget to pop in. And speaking of winning a book, I forgot to post a winner for my post about my writing process a few weeks ago. That winner is Vicki and she has been notified. Thanks to all those who have left comments.... Continue reading
Posted Sep 27, 2020 at Word Wenches
Oh, gosh, Diana, I haven't seen that before. It seems a bit of a strange thing to do. I agree with you — if I reached the middle of the book and saw the prologue being repeated, I'd be wondering what on earth????
Toggle Commented Sep 27, 2020 on Prologues at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Dolores, yes, I think an epilogue is almost required in a romance, though of course not everyone agrees. But in other genres, wow — some fantasies I've read, usually part of a series, end a book on a real cliff-hanger. I have been known to shriek in frustration when that happens! (g)
Toggle Commented Sep 27, 2020 on Prologues at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Annette, I also tend to read everything — as long as it keeps me engaged. But what you said here: "a story that gives me joy, makes me think, makes me laugh, or makes me cry. Or all of the above." That's it in a nutshell. When I first started writing a novel (trying to) the only writing advice I knew was "Make them laugh, make them cry, make them wait" which I thought was Dickens, but I've since read that it was Wilkie Collins, or possibly someone else. Whoever said it first, they were spot on. And thanks for your good wishes about staying well. The numbers are dropping here in Melbourne and we're hopeful that the very severe lockdown restrictions we've had for the last few months will ease soon. Take care of you, too.
Toggle Commented Sep 27, 2020 on Prologues at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Kantu — I'm planning to write about epilogues in a future post.
Toggle Commented Sep 27, 2020 on Prologues at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Pat — glad you enjoyed it. I haven't read that book by Evie Dunmore yet, but it's getting nice buzz.
Toggle Commented Sep 27, 2020 on Prologues at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Mary Jo. "Shakespeare," I said, "congratulating Minou Drouet on a neat phrase?" Recognize the source? (g)
Toggle Commented Sep 27, 2020 on Prologues at Word Wenches
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