This is Anne Gracie's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Anne Gracie's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Anne Gracie
http://www.annegracie.com
Recent Activity
Quantum, I do think there is something of a hierarchy of publishing houses — at least that's what one top author told me a few years ago. But it's not a hard-and-fast ranking — it very much depends on what kind of fiction you're wanting to sell, so the "top" publisher for one person might not be the same for a different writer writing in a different subgenre. Or a writer at a different stage in her career. That said, for most authors it depends on what a publishing house is offering. When I started, I knew very little about the various publishers and which one would be best to target, and so I signed up a New York agent (because I wanted a US publisher) for her expertise and knowledge.
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on Ask A Wench: First Sentences at Word Wenches
1 reply
And of course, there's one of the best known opening lines of all time — Jane Austen's "It is a truth, universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a large fortune must be in want of a wife."
Toggle Commented 3 days ago on Ask A Wench: First Sentences at Word Wenches
1 reply
Lillian, you have no idea how tempting your cigar-puffing duchess is. But you've nailed it exactly, I think. I love the kind of opening where you think, "Oh yes! I'm going to enjoy this!"
Toggle Commented 3 days ago on Ask A Wench: First Sentences at Word Wenches
1 reply
I miss Janga, and her recommendations, too, Quantum. In the early days of submitting manuscripts to publishers, a lot of aspiring authors used to polish their openings like mad, because editors wanted to see a synopsis and the first three chapters. Some people got into the habit of writing *only* the first three chapters, and then waiting hopefully for a yea or a nay, and by the time they did get a yea, they suddenly had to learn how to write middles and endings. I suspect some people still put a disproportionate effort into polishing their opening pages.
Toggle Commented 3 days ago on Ask A Wench: First Sentences at Word Wenches
1 reply
Thanks, Penny. We're very lucky in our setting, I know. And I'm looking forward to the wench panel in New York, and the little retreat after it.
Toggle Commented Apr 6, 2019 on A Writers' Retreat at Word Wenches
1 reply
Cathryn, it's writers doing it for themselves.
Toggle Commented Apr 6, 2019 on A Writers' Retreat at Word Wenches
1 reply
Thanks, Shelagh. Professional tennis players still practice, top ballet dancers still exercise and rehearse, and multipublished authors still need to work on their craft.
Toggle Commented Apr 6, 2019 on A Writers' Retreat at Word Wenches
1 reply
Thanks, Teresa, it is pretty idyllic and we did have a wonderful time.
Toggle Commented Apr 4, 2019 on A Writers' Retreat at Word Wenches
1 reply
Shauna, it's a wonderful experience, which is why we've lasted for 13 years. But please don't think we huddled inside ignoring that gorgeous beach -- we didn't. Swimming, walks along the beach, wading and paddling all enrich the muse and refresh the spirit.
Toggle Commented Apr 4, 2019 on A Writers' Retreat at Word Wenches
1 reply
Thanks, Elise, it's a highlight of my writing year, and I'm feeling very spoiled that I'll be having another retreat with the wenches in July.
Toggle Commented Apr 4, 2019 on A Writers' Retreat at Word Wenches
1 reply
Jeanne glad you enjoyed it. Anyone bearing wine and cheese would have been welcomed with open arms.
Toggle Commented Apr 4, 2019 on A Writers' Retreat at Word Wenches
1 reply
Sue, there's an article here that explains it using some famous examples. https://prowritingaid.com/art/471/Have-You-Written-Your-Story-s--Mirror-Moment--Yet.aspx
Toggle Commented Apr 4, 2019 on A Writers' Retreat at Word Wenches
1 reply
Thanks, Sue. I think you'll be particularly interested in James Scott Bell's approach which, in a nutshell, suggests that there is a mid-point in most movies (and possibly books) where the main character has a "mirror moment," a realization about him or herself, and from that point, begins to change.
Toggle Commented Apr 4, 2019 on A Writers' Retreat at Word Wenches
1 reply
Thanks, Kareni, it was a lovely time away, and we did get a lot done, despite -- or maybe because of the beautiful view.
Toggle Commented Apr 3, 2019 on A Writers' Retreat at Word Wenches
1 reply
Lillian, it was a toss-up whether the constantly changing view was a distraction or an inspiration. But I wouldn't trade it for anything.
Toggle Commented Apr 3, 2019 on A Writers' Retreat at Word Wenches
1 reply
Thanks, Mary. Yes, there's a reason we keep returning to the same place. "I found myself wondering what a Snowflake or James Scott Bell method of plotting was." They're a little too involved to explain here, but you can google them. And I agree with you about stories that focus on character development.
Toggle Commented Apr 3, 2019 on A Writers' Retreat at Word Wenches
1 reply
Kathleen, it was. Also a lot of fun.We packed in so much I was exhausted when I got home.
Toggle Commented Apr 3, 2019 on A Writers' Retreat at Word Wenches
1 reply
Image
Each year I go away on a writing retreat with a small group of other writers. We eat, drink, talk, laugh and write, and we also work to improve our craft and educate ourselves. This year, this is the program we followed. Continue reading
Posted Apr 3, 2019 at Word Wenches
25
I really like Michelle Diener's Dark Horse trilogy. (I think it's a trilogy) Really well worth reading. I also interviewed her on the wenches. https://wordwenches.typepad.com/word_wenches/2017/05/meet-michelle-diener.html
Toggle Commented Mar 30, 2019 on What We're Reading in March at Word Wenches
1 reply
Jane, I'm thinking a WordWench group tour might be a fun thing -- we love so many of the same books. I discovered Essie Summers long after her death, simply because readers kept mentioning her, and her gorgeous word-portraits of the New Zealand landscape. New Zealand is lovely. I posted some photos of my most recent trip there in this post: https://wordwenches.typepad.com/word_wenches/2017/09/new-zealand.html
Toggle Commented Mar 25, 2019 on Literary Pilgrimages at Word Wenches
1 reply
So many wonderful book places to travel, Michelle. And each time someone suggests another one it sends me down another side-trip. I was telling friends about this at breakfast yesterday — I'm away from home, at a book event, and we're all authors and readers — and we decided a Keri Arthur walking tour should be on the agenda. Keri was at breakfast — she's a dark urban fantasy author, with many books set in Melbourne, our mutual home town. We had fun mentally planning it. One day we might even do it.
Toggle Commented Mar 23, 2019 on Literary Pilgrimages at Word Wenches
1 reply
Annette, reading and traveling in the imagination is a blessing, isn't it?
Toggle Commented Mar 23, 2019 on Literary Pilgrimages at Word Wenches
1 reply
Oh Binnie, you certainly need to be on that Mary Stewart trip with us. And yes, the copy of Madam Will You Talk needs to be with us at all times. The only thing I'll happily skip is all the smoking that was so much part of that era. Madam Will You Talk was my first Mary Stewart book and is still my favorite.
Toggle Commented Mar 23, 2019 on Literary Pilgrimages at Word Wenches
1 reply
Ellis Peter's other author name is Edith Pargeter. Thanks to Janice who reminded me of it on facebook.
Toggle Commented Mar 23, 2019 on Literary Pilgrimages at Word Wenches
1 reply
Mary, the brilliant thing is while we can still read and while we have an imagination and books we can still travel wherever we want. And, you know, sometimes the best locations are completely made up and can ONLY be visited in the imagination.
Toggle Commented Mar 22, 2019 on Literary Pilgrimages at Word Wenches
1 reply