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Andrea Penrose/Andrea Pickens/Cara Elliott
historical romance author
Recent Activity
So glad you enjoy hearing about the creative process, Michelle! And I hope you have a VERY big spoon, because the Wenches can yak on this subject by the potful!
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Thanks, Pamela!
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Gail, The chocolate research was great fun, and I loved that I could weave in edible chocolate during the regency and be accurate. (Though I doubt it tasted quite as good as Mr. Fry's innovations!) Glad you enjoyed the post.
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I have to agree with you on that. Epistolary novels feel very remote to me, despite the intimacy between the letter writers. I feel like a real outsider and find it hard to connect to whatever story I'm being told.
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Glad you enjoyed the post, Barbara. You make a really excellent point about knowing the other characters in a first person story. I do enjoy that voice, but like you, I do sometimes miss knowing what the narrator's main foil is thinking. But it's good to read in different styles as well as genres to keep things feeling fresh.
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Thanks, Teresa! Oh, hugs on the chocolate. I would be in BIG trouble if I had a problem with dairy! The next Wrexford and Sloane book has been delivered to my editor and it's scheduled to be out in late September '19.
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Thanks, Maryellen! Glad you enjoyed it.
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Jeanna, yes, in self publishing, you are the boos! You get to make all the creative decisions, including covers. But you also have to do all the promotion and marketing. We Wenches have all been traditionally published, so we have some reader name recognition, which helps tremendously with "discoverability" I think someone trying to break into writing just as an indie has challenges. It's not easy, but it certainly can be done.
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First of all, thanks so much about the lovely comment about the Wench writing. It's very much appreciated. You describe multiple POVs—and their potential problems so well. I always notice when an author tries something complex, like the story describe, and nails it.Am totally willing to be taken on a stylistic ride as long as it's smooth.What annoys me is unclear transitions of POV, or—even worse—head hopping, which drive me crazy!
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Misti, I agree with you on the POV. And as I said, there are always ways to re-see a story . . . I don't any of the Wenches would write a book that we didn't feel was "right." it takes WAY too much book to do if you don't believe in your characters and concept.
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Thanks, Mary!
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Alison, I'll try to explain the "I didin't know they were going to do that!" style of writing: Some writers write use creating very detailed elaborate outlines for what happens in the book as a frame work which is in a sense a skeleton for their characters. For them, this is where the magic happens as they see their characters take shape I simply can't do this. I have a basic concept, and then I start writing. I write slowly, taking my time in crafting the dialogue. And what happens is, I write a line of dialogue in response to a previous one—and suddenly see that character's vulnerability or strength. it's an ah-ah moment, and they happen a lot and build the relationships, oftem having me see new ways to get from point A to point B in the plot. I simply can't do this through an outline. It happens organically. I hope that makes some sense to you!
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Oh, how fun, Pat! That ought to keep their attention! And good for for helping kids learn to love reading as much as we do!
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Sue, so glad you enjoy the "behind the scenes" look at how we create. I totally agree with you about head-hopping—that is, changing POV with a very clear transition. It really bothers me. Like you, I'm happy to go with a varieties of structures, but the author just has to make it clear and consistent.
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First of all so sorry about the posting problem, Quantum. Typepad had been impossibly glitchy to day, and we're still trying to sort it out. I, too, love seeing how every creative process is different. When the basic idea is pretty much shaped, I write by "feel"— that is, I react as dialogue unfolds and and often find myself tweaking plot points as I understand the characters better. I really like first person, too. Publishers use to to really discourage it, but things are loosening up—because of self publishing, no doubt—and we're seeing more of it.
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Andrea here, I’m just putting the finishing touches a new Lady Arianna mystery, which got me to musing on how a series takes shape in an author’s head . . . But first allow me set the scene: For those of you who follow the series, you may recall that the last Lady A book, SMOKE AND LIES, took place on Elba amidst international intrigue and deceptions as Napoleon plotted his escape from the tiny island off Italy in order to re-seize the French throne. In A QUESTION OF NUMBERS, Lady Arianna and Lord Saybrook’s latest adventure, (which will be... Continue reading
Posted 7 days ago at Word Wenches
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Oh, I totally agree about Alexa. I find that very creepy. And really, I just don't get it. I can call to order a pizza or turn on my own lights without a machine doing it for me. Urk!
Toggle Commented Oct 29, 2018 on Lessons in Longitude at Word Wenches
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Oh, the Tessa Dare story sounds delightful. Will check it out. And yes, I'm not very interesting either . . .it's just the principle.!
Toggle Commented Oct 29, 2018 on Lessons in Longitude at Word Wenches
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Mary, so glad you enjoyed the post. You make a very good point about risk in any endeavor! Yes, the sailors who braved the true unknown were pretty amazing, as are any explorers who dare venture past any known boundary. I will definitely pat more attention to privacy settings!
Toggle Commented Oct 27, 2018 on Lessons in Longitude at Word Wenches
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Yikes—I hadn't realized that, Mary! Do people have to work "9 to 5" regardless of where they live? And thanks for the tip on the fan msueum. I somehow missed that, but next time! The Maritime Museum there is spectacular too. Greenwich is definitely well worth the trip for all the wonderful things out there.
Toggle Commented Oct 27, 2018 on Lessons in Longitude at Word Wenches
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Thanks so much for sharing, Frances! I love it!
Toggle Commented Oct 26, 2018 on Lessons in Longitude at Word Wenches
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I agree with you, Beverly. I worry that people–especially young people who've never learned how to compute things by themselves—would be helpless if suddenly they had to fend for themselves. Imagine if you couldn't google how to make a fishing hook, or build an igloo! I definitely vote for an end to Daylight Savings. I hate it being dark at 5 pm! And as you say, it's just outlived its usefulness.
Toggle Commented Oct 26, 2018 on Lessons in Longitude at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Sue. A pendulum really is cool to contemplate! Such a fun visual understanding how physics is all around us! My phone GPS has rescued my on many a long drive to a new place. It's really nice not to have to be worried about getting lost. So it's a definite plus in making life easier. I just think we need to be aware of all the ramifications. It's here for good and we need to deal with it—thoughtfully, I hope!
Toggle Commented Oct 26, 2018 on Lessons in Longitude at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Mary! So glad you enjoyed it. Yes, the privacy stuff truly is a two-edged sword. Yes, it's good when Evil is stopped because of technology. But it's a little unsettling when I get an ad on my browser, based on something I've written in an e-mail, but not posted on any social media. The parsing of Big Data opens all sorts of difficult ethical questions.
Toggle Commented Oct 26, 2018 on Lessons in Longitude at Word Wenches
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I love the Greenwich Observatory too, Amy. It really makes an impression to see in person the the development of things we take for granted. It's a great reminder of how much incredible creativity and ingenuity it takes for innovation.
Toggle Commented Oct 26, 2018 on Lessons in Longitude at Word Wenches
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