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Keith Thomas
Interests: Owner, www.evfit.com
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In another part of the survey, they admitted the palaeo diet was the most effective, but could not recommend the it because 'people couldn't stick with it'. And they made their decision in the face of hundreds of people who did! However, the principle underlying the palaeo diet is the evolutionary health principle, first laid out by Stephen boyden in 1973: http://www.natsoc.org.au/Evolution.htm Boyden introduced the term 'evolutionary health principle' a decade or two later and the application of the principle to modern life is laid out here: http://www.evfit.com/ev_health_principle.htm
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"The chocolate was 70% cacoa" which means it was also about 30% sugar (of some sort). There are 100% bars available in the US through Dagoba. Then, even more palaeo, you can get raw cacao beans through any serious natural foods store. This is the source I use: http://www.powersuperfoods.com/cacaopower/index.html and there's bound to be one near you too.
Toggle Commented May 18, 2009 on Saturday Cooking at Free the Animal
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Richard wrote: "how likely does it seem to you that primitive hunter-gatherers generally ate an entire animal..." I'm with Patrik and Richard on this one. One point that has not been mentioned so far is that it takes a lot of people to eat a bison. We cannot assume that the family/tribe/band came with an appetite that always matched carcass-size. I have never killed and butchered a cow, but my son did so recently - alone. He had to take two wheelbarrow loads of unwanted innards away and dump them. Without refrigeration, he would have had about three days to pick what he wanted off the carcass before the maggots beat him to it. In that scenario he would pick what to him were the choice cuts, and he would certainly never have used all the meat. (On this occasion he kept the hide.)
Toggle Commented Apr 22, 2009 on Cordain, again... at Free the Animal
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Indeed. Barry Groves wrote a useful contribution on this for the Paleodiet list back in 2003. He gave me permission to expose his explanation on my website: http://www.evfit.com/calories.htm
Toggle Commented Mar 14, 2009 on Thought Exercise at Free the Animal
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Another point about the simplistic "calorie in / calorie out" approach is that it assumes faeces (and other bodily discharges) have no calories.
Toggle Commented Mar 14, 2009 on Thought Exercise at Free the Animal
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Scott, I agree that we are "not optimally engineered via evolution". However, evolution provided a lab which produced, over three million years or so, a solution tested against all environmental and social influences – and their interactions - that "works". Can science create an even better diet, you ask. Well, it's theoretically possible, but extraordinarily unlikely. I eat red grapes (and chew their pips) and drink a red wine once a week or so. But I wouldn’t touch a resveratrol supplement. It’s my guess resveratrol supplements would be just like anti-oxidant supplements: having a different effect in the body whether taken as part of a natural diet when the consuming body is fit and active in a Palaeolithic way or as a pill by a couch potato body experiencing 21st century stresses etc. I don't see longevity as particularly to be aimed for, though it appears to be the implied metric used to demonstrate the virtues of this diet / that lifestyle / the other fitness regime. I have seen far too many feeble (really feeble) people approaching 100 to want such a fate. I'm 60 now and have "rude good health" and I look forward to continuing through to 75. After that, I expect a more rapid decline, but if I still haven't been prescribed meds, I can exert myself vigorously to do everything I need to do, while my brain does not succumb to enfeeblement and while the friends and family I cherish also value me, I'll continue happily as I am. As we say over here “I wouldn’t be dead for quids”!
Toggle Commented Mar 13, 2009 on Vitamin Supplements - Part Four at Free the Animal
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Richard, there is a businessman on the web who plagiarizes the stuff Art DeVany and others write in the area of palaeo nutrition and exercise and then sells it off for profit with his own copyright. You may already know who he is. That's not what's important for this topic. What is relevant is that for the supplements he recommends, he generally lists the natural sources of these chemicals, so people can make their own choices about supplementation through pharmaceuticals, supplementation through healthy food and activity regimes or a combination. What can you suggest about the sources our Palaeolithic ancestors had for vitamin D (3), Omega-3s (I think we all know the answer to that one), vitamin K2, menatetrenone (MK-4)? As to other supplements, there are soils which are either deficient in certain minerals or else the minerals, though present, are locked up in very stable compounds because the soil microbes (bacteria and fungi) have been disabled through aridification or other degradation. Soils in parts of China are, effectively, deficient in iodine. Soils in Australia ("the oldest continent") have lost a lot of their selenium. It's no good Chinese using USDA data to find out how much iodine is present in foods grown in parts of their country, nor should Australians assume that USDA data on the selenium content of beef applies to meat from animals grown in Australia. So I'd suggest that mineral supplementation based on the nutritional content of the food we actually eat (not national averages) is a subject that could do with more exploration.
Toggle Commented Mar 11, 2009 on Vitamin Supplements - Part Four at Free the Animal
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Can you post here your contribution to Oprah's site, please? It'd be great to have it on the record when Oprah balloons out again in 18 months time.
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Found it through Google, Richard: http://zerocarbforlife.com/?p=1
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Richard and all - great post and what a rich thread in response! Seems most of the comments come from people like me: a white middle-aged male. We know that African-American and Hispanic populations are more heavily endowed with obese individuals and we know that women's hormone profiles and responses differ from those of males. Furthermore the menopause is a period of hormonal turbulence which males don't have to cope with. It's my guess, too, that the population segment that has the highest proportion of "dieters" is young women who are at the peak of their readiness for child-bearing and so their hormones are pumping like never before - and never again. Can we be sure that our diet and exercise recommendations apply to women (and to 54 year old African American women) just as much as they apply to adult males? Female musculature, stature, longevity and skeletons are not identical to those of males. In evolutionary terms women's patterns of activity were different from males and their food intake probably was too (higher proportion of food from local foraging in contrast to males' higher proportion from wide-ranging hunting. Women may also have eaten more cooked food as they would have been nearer a fire than the men who covered distance when hunting well away from the settlement's fire). While I am asking this question, although I am sure the paleo diet is as appropriate for children as it is for adults, I would also suggest that the defining characteristics of children's diet and exercise patterns differ from those of adults. Just look at the way children play and contrast it with what adults are doing at the same time - in both hunter-gatherer societies or in our own.
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Another great post, Richard. I have your site set to open every time I log in anew (Firefox). Haven't commented previously, but I thought I should let you know how much I appreciate your insights and information.
Toggle Commented Dec 29, 2008 on The Look of Success at Free the Animal
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If a chocolate is 70% cocoa, the other 30% will be mainly sugar - cane, beet or corn in origin. Keith
Toggle Commented Feb 24, 2006 on Chocolate: The Darker the Better at Matt Metzgar
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