This is Ryan's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Ryan's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Ryan
Thunder Bay, Ontario
Recent Activity
I don't believe we can alter food enough to match our urban life. Since our departure from an agrarian life to a job/car/couch-centric life, we have been trying to change everything else. Medicating, incarcerating, and doctoring the problems away. Whole, real food (yes some of it is illegal to consume here in Ontario), good hard work, and a simpler life has done wonders for my own health. From Charles Bowden in Blood Orchid: "We are an exceptional model of the human race. We no longer know how to produce food. We no longer can heal ourselves. We no longer raise our young. We have forgotten the names of the stars, fail to notice the phases of the moon. We do not know the plants and they no longer protect us. We tell ourselves we are the most powerful specimens of our kind who have ever lived. But when the lights are off we are helpless. We cannot move without traffic signals. We must attend classes in order to learn by rote numbered steps toward love or how to breast-feed our baby. We justify anything, anything at all by the need to maintain our way of life. And then we go to the doctor and tell the professionals we have no life. We have a simple test for making decisions: our way of life, which we cleverly call our standard of living, must not change except to grow yet more grand. We have a simple reality we live with each and every day: our way of life is killing us."
Toggle Commented Oct 24, 2011 on Nutritionists??? at Robert Paterson's Weblog
1 reply
Ryan is now following Rob Paterson
Sep 4, 2011
"There are 600,000 people under 25 in Britain who have never had a day of work." This could be a blessing for them... paid employment is probably the worst R.O.I for your energy input. Education is not required to provide well for yourself and family. The smart ones will structure a life requiring little "paid employment" and find a way to make money filling a niche. Here comes the respect once held by farmers, carpenters, fishers and people who knew how to produce something of value with their two own hands. Even urban dwellers, like I am "out voted" to be, could have every square inch of back yard producing food, and chickens to eat the rest of the growing stuff I am still too "NorthAmericanized" to try. I am working on finding something to do, that could potentially reduce or even eliminate my need for paid employment....before the rosy veil is shredded and we see what kind of a creek we are floating on with no paddle in sight.
1 reply
+1 here. Real hard money, a large garden, 10 ladies about to supply eggs, and a large popcorn to watch the show. 2 years ago, a certain handful of people scoffed at me when I outlined a coming food crisis, and financial meltdown. They still won't listen, but they won't argue or scoff either. Just a deer in the headlights.... normalcy bias will kill the cat.
1 reply
I've raised cross layers a few times now and I don't understand how you would think raising them in cages would be better than letting them feed themselves and be chickens. My garden was fertilized, the slugs were found before too much damage could be done and I didn't have the mess to clean out of the coop if they were to have spent their whole lives there. By letting them free, they fed and watered themselves quite well. Not to mention the antics, they are natural entertainers. P.S.: to the farmers who say not to bond with the chicks; my girls would come when I called them, making it easy to round them up for the night.
1 reply
The best information we could have will be personal experience (which includes our parents/grandparents). Imagine how happy our elders will be to receive so many visits. Many may even find they have a place back with their families as mentors, teachers, and care givers for the young. Everything we do will have to be planned with sustainability in mind from which shovel you buy, what seed you may save for next year, how you treat your neighbour, to what you do with your own feces. Focus will be narrowed down to family and small community. I'm thinking that when communities are enforcing the law, criminals will have less recourse than they do now. Now they sue if they hurt themselves breaking into your home, when communities are taking care of the law themselves, it could be years, if at all, before any real authority finds out what happened to that thief.
1 reply
If everyone moved their money to a credit union, would we not just make new people very rich thus starting the whole thing all over again with new faces? I'm sure a few of the old crew would just set up some "small & safe" looking banks to fool a few; make it look like a lot of choices but really the same people pulling all the strings.
1 reply
An excerpt from the Globe and Mail a while ago...the time to get out was then and now. Derek Foster promotes himself as "Canada's youngest retiree" - a regular guy who punched out of the work force at 34 by investing in blue-chip stocks and living off the dividends. His seductively simple approach to riding out turbulent markets by focusing on dividends, not day-to-day market gyrations, resonated with tens of thousands of Canadians who bought his bestselling books such as Stop Working, Here's How You Can! and The Lazy Investor. So it may come as a shock to his loyal fans that Mr. Foster - the same guy who advised readers to hold good stocks "forever" and to "buy more shares" if there's a market crash - recently did something out of character: He dumped virtually all of his holdings. When one of the most fervent advocates of buy and hold investing bails out is it a sign that the bear market is about to get a lot worse? Or is it the ultimate contrarian indicator, signaling that markets have reached the point of maximum pessimism and are poised for a rebound? http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20090312.wrderekfoster12/BNStory/SpecialEvents2
1 reply
I agree with you that it is a trendy thing to do,if you have the money for it. The prices here are a little inflated because most of the people shopping there have the little extra money to buy it. I hear the next step up is to have an organic gardener to come over to your place and grow a garden for you Leaving your harvest on the doorstep, already picked for you. I actually know the guy I buy my potatoes from, and he doesn't sell at the market. My eggs are straight from a farm as well, not the market. When I say I know the farmers, I grew up with some of them, or their sons and daughters. But, I will disagree with you that it is only the latest fad. I had a meeting with a community garden project, and it was unlike any I had seen before. They have transformed a part of town, that is very poor, into a food network. They plant their back yards, some front yards and even in the alleys. They encourage neighbours to plant as well, giving them seeds, tools, and help with the labour, and lessons on storage and preserving. There are no postage stamp size plots to plant, it is really about community and food.
1 reply
Mercury in the corn/corn syrup, peanuts not safe either, lysteriosis in the meat (not too sure what is worse though....the meat or the bacterium), never mind what's in the milk and baby food. I think the point of smaller scale farming, is being able to get to know who is growing your food. There are less people handling the food, less storage and transport time, and the money stays in the local economy. When the farmer is part of the community he sells in, he takes pride in his produce.
1 reply
These are not new tactics of course. I read an article the other day, sorry no link its lost in the web somewhere, describing the history of Victory gardens and the opposition to them. Even Eleanor Roosevelt faced lots of opposition when she pushed for a victory garden project. In my hometown, Thunder Bay Ontario, I'm hearing there are quite a few laws that cripple the farmers here. Not being able to sell directly to consumers, no chickens in town, etc, all in the name of food security and health. There is an underground market of course...I have and will continue to buy from farmers, both eggs and veggies and meat. When was the last time you ate orange yolks?
1 reply
Rob, that sounds like our media acts like a corporation...with an interest for a few "important" people. I thought that news was impartial? I thought that our reporters were smarter than just reporting what PR press releases tell them, maybe I'm wrong. What happened to finding the real story? We need real reporters back in the mainstream, and editors and owners willing to be unpopular with governments and corporations. Any time I hear a mainstream news story now, I always check in with the indy news to get all the "good spin" taken out. http://challengingtheonlylifeweknow.blogspot.com/
1 reply
As with any real change, you would be better to start at the ground and work up. Perhaps start with the reporters and writers (although do they decide what stories to cover or are they told?) http://challengingtheonlylifeweknow.blogspot.com/
1 reply
I read an article from yesterdays NYTimes about the United Arab Emirates investments in "green" technology. It seems they can see an end of oil future. http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/13/world/middleeast/13greengulf.html?em
1 reply
When I was growing up, I remember a bad snow storm and radio stations were key to finding out what was wrong, where. At one point, the DJ organized a ride for an elderly man on another listeners snowmobile to get to a dialysis appointment. I think a community based emergency plan would be a good idea...internet is a good idea, but have a back up plan. It would be good practice as well for the hard times to come. Alberta has a province wide emergency broadcast system, through CKUA Radio. It might be a good model to work with.
1 reply