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ElMondo
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That story is beginning-to-end awesome. Well done on the crew's part.
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Not to nitpick, but: Sometimes in English, Chinese names are written with the surname first (natively I think they're always first). For example, it would be like saying "Lincoln, Abraham". So depending on whether the Chinese Army PR folks anglicized his name for the press or not, it's entirely possible that his family name is "Fang". I don't know whether that makes things better or worse, though. ;) :D
Toggle Commented Apr 23, 2013 on Photo: Frenemies at BlackFive
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Or maybe you have a better explanation for this insanity. What, you never heard of Detroit before? (*runs away giggling*)
Toggle Commented Mar 4, 2013 on Plans to invade Canada proceed at BlackFive
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... cont'd Now, imagine giving them responsibility for checking all passing vehicles for a given subset of violations: Drunk driving, speeding, expired registrations, etc. And leave open the possibility that the list of violations will grow and change, but most likely never shrink, forcing every booth to check every vehicle for even more violations as time passes. Now, unlike the real world road systems, imagine that the traffic is increasing 46 percent per year (citation: http://newsroom.cisco.com/dlls/2008/prod_061608b.html - caveat: This is global internet use, not just US). So much so that new roads are being built all the time, and current ones are adding "lanes" (bandwidth). The system gets unweildy very fast. But mandatory ISP level DPI was proposed by Richard Clarke, someone who get paid attention to in Washington. He's not ignorant or malicious; far from it, he means well and is honestly concerned for US internet security. But again, like you said: "...rules that impose unfair constraints, or will never keep up with the real threat - rendering them useless". I'm not even beginning to describe some of the issues that are not easily addressed by deep packet inspection. For example, it's defeatable via encryption. Also: How do you separate legit traffic from illegitimate? A login to a CEO's or congressman's bank account may be legitimate from that person's home... or it could be a compromised computer where the intruder has keysniffed the person's credentials. You can't tell if it's legit, even if it's from the same computer. Automobile analogies fail to illustrate some of these potential problems. Anyway, the point is that figuring out what should be done is indeed the difficult part. The difficulty is expanded when you realize that the list of things that should be done will be a moving target, since the compromises will evolve. So, what does the US do? Well, like I said: The goals are changing because the threats are evolving. I don't have an answer now; I'm not an advanced security expert, I'm merely an IT professional who deals with it. All I can say is that the situation lends itself to imposing the hardest kind of study possible: Learning through hard knocks. It may be that centrally mandated solutions are necessary. It may be the opposite. But all I know is that whatever evolves, it'll evolve in a crucible of virtual fire.
Toggle Commented Sep 10, 2012 on NY Times Editorial: Cybersecurity at BlackFive
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I may not be military, but I am in IT, and one sentence in this post does resonate: In the interim, companies will either be handcuffed by rules that impose unfair constraints, or will never keep up with the real threat - rendering them useless. That unfortunately is a very real possibility. Richard Clarke - counterterrorist expert, former "Cybersecurity" advisor to the White House - had once proposed the idea of requiring all broadband providers in the US to perform deep packet inspection of all its traffic. For all I know, he's still in favor of this. Problem is, it's a terrible idea. Imagine toll booth like stops for vehicle traffic. Except they're on every and all public roadways (highways, freeways, etc.) and intended to funnel any and all public traffic through them. (cont'd...)
Toggle Commented Sep 10, 2012 on NY Times Editorial: Cybersecurity at BlackFive
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Call me a crazy-ass pot-stirrer, but I think the US should *encourage* the idea. You see, we should make them participate in both rescues and drug-interdiction, and then the US can actually turn the whole propogadistic exercise onto it's head. Furthermore, we all know the second half of that statement that starts with keep your friends close but... ;) I mean, think about it. If they want to place some of their prize military technology that close to our naval bases, that'll save the US the trouble of locating them if something hits the fan. An Iranian ship in the Atlantic or the Gulf of Mexico is a LOT more cut off from home than a US warship in the Persian Gulf, and US force projection that close to the CONUS... well, let's say it'll possible to deal with a threat and still make it home in time for dinner. Yeah, I say "bring it".
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I don't mean to be a downer, but: What's sad is how not-recent the list of celebrities who've served is. Everyone listed seems to have been a veteran of WWII, Korea, or Vietnam, but can we name any current celebs who've been in Somalia? Afghanistan? Iraq? The closest I can think of off the top of my head is the rap artist Shaggy, who was a Marine and served in Desert Storm. It's sad. It really is. So much of the famous segment of modern life has so little in common with their predecessors.
Toggle Commented Jul 16, 2012 on Hollywood goes to war at BlackFive
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South Korea needs to engage in some psychological warfare over this. They should blast "Yakety Sax" across the border next time the North tries to launch anything. :D
Toggle Commented Apr 14, 2012 on Norks rocket fail at BlackFive
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Travis R. is right, of course, about power-to-weight ratio being the more important element affecting dynamics than just straight-out horsepower. And it's perfectly possible to have interesting, competetive racing without having to exceed 800, 900, 1000, etc. horsepower. So I do want to point out that my whole concern with power spec is actually an image, not a racing issue. It would be unfair to be pigenholed as a minor league series simply based on horsepower, but I could see fans - and perhaps some marketers - in alternate race series doing exactly that in order to make their series look superior. Again, that wouldn't necessarily be fair. But lots of issues with image never are fair; they simply exist. That's why I'm concerned about it.
Toggle Commented Jul 14, 2010 on And the Answer is: DALLARA (sort of) at pressdog.com
I hate to say this because I'm actually happy at the multi-source chassis announcement, but Pressdog and Tony Johns from PopOffValve have a point: Will other manufacturers jump in with aero kits or not? I think the idea is stellar, and I like its potential, but the outstanding questions is, are Lola and other racing manufacturers willing to come onboard? And beyond them, how about all the others that are to be made "welcome"? Although I'd love to be proven wrong on this, I don't see a snowball's chance in hell of Boeing contributing, yet they were also mentioned as a possibility, weren't they (I didn't get to watch the announcement here at work)? As much as I like this concept of Dallara tub/others aero, I fear that if there's no buy-in from other manufacturers, this idea will fail badly, and that failure might be fatal to Indycar. ------ But, enough cynicism. Presuming others will provide the sidepod/wing kits, how many other manufacturers expressed an interest in producing engines? I've read that Honda actually wants others involved (go figure; whoda thunk a company would give up a monopoly?), but I don't know who else is onboard to power this chassis. And while we're at it: Do we know what the specs are for power? The last thing I want to see is HP go down; if that happens, NASCAR will be laughing their butts off at us. Power **NEEDS** to at bare minimum stay put, and preferably rise. I don't think we're going to see the days of the 900HP CART engines again in the near future, but if power drops, then I fear Indycar risks becoming a laughingstock. It cannot drop below current levels, period. If it does, Indy risks being thought of as existing on the level of GP2, or perhaps lower. And that too would be fatal to the series. That said, I love the idea of hearing multiple (I hope!) aero-engine combinations. And internet boards can become buzzing will all sorts of talk about the relative merits of given combinations. If nothing else, the new standard opening the doors to potentially diverse combinations (if manufacturers buy into the concept and produce products) gives fans something to obsess over. And that will not be a bad thing.
Toggle Commented Jul 14, 2010 on And the Answer is: DALLARA (sort of) at pressdog.com
Yes, it's true that neither NYC or Vegas needs or wants an F1 race, but if I remember correctly, Ecclestone had once included Vegas on his list of desireable locations. GeorgeK is right, of course: The casinos themselves don't want any distractions that could draw their whales away from the tables, so there's no way in hell they'd ever agree to one. And New York City is simply apathetic to the idea. But that's why I said that if somehow either happened, I'd be amazed at his marketing skills. It'd be a step above selling air conditioning to Eskimos; it's be more like selling agnosticism to the Vatican. So if Bernie found a promoter who could actually convince either city to hold a race, I'd be in open awe. That promoter would literally be turning negative opinions around, not merely convincing neutral populations. ------ And Pressdog too has a point: Austin? Where's the racing crowd there? And where would the crowd outside of Austin come from? Places like NYC or Vegas - or Miami, or other natural tourist/vacation destinations - would be natural locations for an international race series like Formula One, but Austin? I'm sorry, but I think this is much more a case of Bernie being nice to a friend (the promoter Tavo Hellmund) and saying positive things than it being any sort of reality. To use a software term: This sounds like vaporware. I'll believe it's possible when the track goes up; I'll believe it's happening when the cars show up. Until then, I'm skeptical of a race happening there. And even if everything worked out and they showed, I still need to be shown where the crowd will be drawn from. Austin's an awesome town, but that in and of itself wouldn't tempt F1 fans to make the trip. There's no natural market for such a race there.
1. I'll believe the Texas race when I see it. I mean, they still need some basics taken care of... **like the freakin' racetrack itself!** 2. Yes, Bernie would love New York. Too bad NY'ers aren't necessarily enamored of the idea of a race in their city. But that said, if Bernie manages to convince either NYC or Vegas to host a street race - not build a track somewhere 20 miles out of town, but host an honest-to-goodness race on their existing boulevards - I'll concede that Bernie's got some mad sales skills. Personally, I wouldn't mind seeing such a race, but it's not me that needs convincing.
@Leigh O'Gorman Quote: "I understand your point, but the fact that Carroll has either been a champion or a top-level competitor at many categories of single-seater racing, makes the differences between the two drivers quite apparent." True. Keep in mind that I wasn't necessarily invoking Carroll as a rookie to racing in general, but Indycar specifically. But yes, you're right, Carroll has a resume of past performance. Thing is, so does Milka, and while it's not exactly GP2 or A1GP (which are notches on Carroll's resume), something like ALMS is still nothing to sneeze at. Regardless, like I said before, I believe that Milka's problem is simply that she's risen to her level of incompetence. She can drive a sports car, but there's just something about open wheel that eludes her. And as other people have pointed out, she's already regressing, which isn't a good sign. Quote: "I suppose the only irony here is that where Duno has large backers, Carroll has spent his entire career having absolutely no money." No offense to Carroll, who was indeed coming up through the European ranks, but: That doesn't bug me as much as Graham Rahal losing his McD's sponsorship and subsequently not having a full-time ride. He's won a race in his rookie year for cryin' out loud! Milka being in while Rahal is out is nearly criminal in my mind! I'd love to defend Milka. I really would; multiple masters, instinctive courtesy to fans, great spokesperson... off the track, what's not to like? Problem is, no race series has those as primary criteria, let alone Izod Indycar, and if you can't drive, it doesn't matter whether you're a Nobel Prize winner in line for canonization or not. You Can Not Drive. End of story.
Toggle Commented Jul 6, 2010 on Should IndyCar "Park Milka?" at pressdog.com
First time commenter here; thank goodness more Indycar blogs exist than I previously had thought did. ------ "...thank god for Marco Andretti's reflexes and brakes, because Milka could have put him in the fence at Iowa." "Milka's nearly total lack of situational awareness. She's nice, quite bright, cute, etc., but she does not know what to do in pressure situations on track. No matter how well-meaning, her inability to react SAFELY to situations on track makes her a danger to everyone's well-being, including hers." I have to agree with both those posts, and many of the others. The argument defending Milka has always been that there are always backmarkers in any racing sport. But the more I think about it, the more I realize it's not just the fact that she runs last, but as SBPopOffValve noted, the fact that she cannot react properly to getting lapped. That Iowa incident, as tame as it looks in hindsight, made my heart skip a beat when it happened. How can a driver who had already been lapped at that point react that way to getting lapped again? Fact of the matter is, she's just demonstrated the Peter Principle. And because this is racing, that makes her dangerous. It isn't necessarily her speed, it's her lack of instinct plus her inappropriate reactions. I mean, she's been in how many Indycar races already? And Adam Carroll's only been in 1, and to the best of my knowledge didn't make the same miscues?
Toggle Commented Jul 6, 2010 on Should IndyCar "Park Milka?" at pressdog.com
Hubba.... ubba.... oobaaa... humahumahumahumahumahuma (*drools*)
Toggle Commented May 17, 2010 on Muslim Hottie wins Miss USA at BlackFive
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"... I called a few producers to let them know that Hasan had never served overseas. No PTSD." Heh. I saw some talking head on TV (forget which channel; I was just flipping through) say that just listening to returning soldiers horror stories was enough to induce PTSD. Obviously, I flipped away from the channel in disgust. Look, I'm not about to say that having to listen to a constant litany of problems from psychological patients has no effect on a doctor. On the contrary, that's why doctors have to be mentally tough, and put up with a ton of crap in residency: It's to build both physical and mental resillience because what they see in their practice of medicine will mentally injure them, over and over again. Psychologically, medicine is a tough profession, and Psychiatry a real tough one. But at the same time, how does one call that "PTSD"? That's a different disorder.
Toggle Commented Nov 6, 2009 on Fort Hood Shooting - Aftermath at BlackFive
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You know what my problem is with this? It's that separating insurgents from the general population doesn't seem to be a priority now. If all a fighter has to do to avoid fire is to "hug" a civillian, well, then, we just failed in denying the "fish" the "ocean" to swim in. Color me disappointed. No, I don't advocate just firing on civillian houses freely, but I also have a problem with intentionally defining a safe area for the enemy. That's just as stupid.
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Best line from loweringthebar.net: "He found that their attack on "Crunchberries" should fare no better than their prior claims that "Froot Loops" did not contain real froot."
Toggle Commented Jun 5, 2009 on "Crunch Berries" Aren't Real Berries at Al Dente
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Would this be more your speed, Unca J.? http://www.7gadgets.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/11/gff.jpg (*Ducks*)
Toggle Commented Jun 2, 2009 on The Ducati Euro-Tard at BlackFive
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"And, be sure to tell the kids that this isn't a soccer ball. It can't be bounced, kicked, or tossed." ... and she still gave it to a bunch of kids? Is she positive it can't be bounced, kicked, or tossed around?? ;) :D
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Can anyone tell me why McKiernan was relieved to begin with? If it's over his statement regarding more troops, as Michael Yon suspects, then that was a pretty superficial firing. What general doesn't ask for more troops. But, if McKiernan was doing something wrong... well, my point is that we simply don't know. Or at least I don't.
Toggle Commented May 13, 2009 on The New US Commander in Afghanistan at BlackFive
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