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samj.net
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Ok so how is your VPN link to an external datacenter different to what enterprises typically have in place today? They manage massive VPNs linking many sites, some of which have (or are) datacenters. It makes little difference whether the sites are run by (e.g. under the administrative control of) the organisation or by some 3rd party like IBM - if it's a single-tenant architecture then you're going to pay +/- the same and you're still going to have to engineer for peak loads and miss out on the economies of scale. Yes virtualisation is naturally evolving (fairly quickly given stiff competition) but adding an accounting layer does not make a cloud, nor does having multiple sites or outsourcing the management to a contractor. Strapping the 'cloud' moniker to this is underselling cloud, which is all about reducing complexity, leveraging economies of scale, securely sharing resources between tenants, 'infinite' on-demand scalability, tearing down perimeters, etc. - none of which are offered by your 'private cloud'. On the other hand, having a single sign on system based on say OpenID/OAuth and then being able to access any (authorised) resource from anywhere is (logically) 'private', even if Internet facing, and yet still derives the many benefits of cloud computing. In summary, let's call a spade a spade. If you're rolling out virtualised datacenters then don't kid yourself (or your clients) into thinking it's 'cloud computing'. Sam
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Unix philosophy was very successful because it consisted of small tools that do one thing well, enabling power users to do some pretty clever things by 'aggregating' tools like cat, grep, etc. with pipelines. The same can be said of cloud computing, only the pipelines are replaced by internet protocols (typically HTTP[S]) and are thus network accessible. Everything's a URL and is universally accessible (with the requisite authorisation) so you don't have to worry about perimeters (hence 'THE' cloud). Here's a PoC I whipped up a while back. Of course it'll be a while before you can 'pipe' your contacts between arbitrary providers, but that's more a question of language than linkage and structured text (XML, JSON, etc.) over REST already gets you most of the way there. We do agree on "leveraging open architectures for the interoperable exchange of data as well as resiliency, scale and utility computing", only I'm more about giving users tools today than trying to tackle the big picture from scratch (which rarely works, at least on the Internet). Cheers, Sam
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I'm surprised the definition discussion survived into 2009 when we have a pretty good definition already (developed as a 'compatible consensus' of the various definitions at the time). I also wonder why we all need to have our own "ontology", "taxonomy", "stack", etc. when it is increasingly clear that this leads to confusion and complexity. The vast majority of actors in the cloud computing space are (potential) users and foisting this detail (which is meant to be concealed 'in the cloud') on them does not help, particularly when the advice is often conflicting. The noise coming from this bunch of (mostly) vendors over the last 6 months or so is not helping either (particularly in the absence of any tangible deliverables on the horizon)... customers are ready to buy... today... solutions that are already available... today... and essentially telling them it's not ready is counterproductive. If the wildly successful Unix philosophy is to be any indication then it will be small, manageable components that will make this stuff work, not overcomplication like that which crippled the grid movement. I'm more looking to innovative vendors for developments, and perhaps the open source community to tie them together with a thin compatibility layer. That way you can target the 'consensus API', for want of a better word, and then manage and/or reside in the cloud of your choice. Sam
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I've been talking about IPv6 being a first class citizen in cloud computing environments for a while... it may cause some pain for providers but they should be building out new infrastructure anyway rather than sprinkling magic fairy dust on existing kit. Sam
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