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NextMoon
Sonoma Valley CA
Interests: Finds joy in language, ideas and content, great food and wine, plus living in Sonoma.
Recent Activity
What a wonderful story, Frances. Thank you so much for sharing your experience in the Museum, as well as the stories and memories about your grandfather. Gallagher & Associates was responsible for the exhibit design, and they are one of our clients. Here's a link to the project on their website — https://gallagherdesign.com/projects/the-national-world-war-ii-museum/ You'll see a number of other historical museums in their portfolio, and in addition, they are currently involved with the new National Medal of Honor Museum in South Carolina, working with world-famous Safdie Architects. Best, Marjanne
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In the late 1960s and early 1970s, my mother and I rode on jitneys like the one pictured. They ran along Mission Street with a route from downtown San Francisco to "top of the hill" in Daly City. My recollection is that they were much faster than a bus and less expensive, too. And unlike the buses, everyone had a seat. Link to video of Matthew's Top of the Hill Daly City — https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RsPTgYMjNcs
Toggle Commented Sep 19, 2017 on Word of the week: Jitney at Fritinancy
Re strategy& — Booz & Company has long had a really excellent publication called strategy+business, as well as the domain www.strategy-business.com. I just checked, and both are still working, with a new masthead (strategy&) saying, "strategy+business is published by PwC Strategy& Inc." This makes their use of an ampersand even more interesting, since they already had a respected identity for strategy+. (It also shows an unresolved style issue regarding capital letters.) You might also be interested in Wert & Company — www.wertco.com — an international executive search firm that uses the ampersand as a design element as well as visual reinforcement for what they do — connecting people. Each page of their website has an ampersand in a different typeface (with a library of options that change with each click), and their Twitter avatar has a really gorgeous one. I have been quite envious ever since they unveiled the new site.
Toggle Commented Jul 3, 2014 on Ampersandwich at Fritinancy
I think that Vision, Beliefs, and Culture are evolutionary, driving growth and development of an organization. Products and Services need to be a direct outcome of the evolutionary forces, but are informed by external forces (markets and clients) as well as business drivers. Where is Strategy in this diagram?
Toggle Commented Dec 4, 2009 on The Vision Led Org at Logic+Emotion
Many of these customs come from older marriage ceremonies. For instance, I attended the wedding of a Hindu couple, and the officiant was a Pundit who spoke in Sanskrit and translated into English. the wedding couple's hands were also tied together with rope, and then the couple circled the wedding bower. The Pundit commented on the ancient custom of "tying the knot."
Toggle Commented Aug 17, 2009 on Word of the Week: Handfasting at Fritinancy
Huzzah!
Toggle Commented Jul 31, 2009 on Not Quite Bronze at Fritinancy
First of all, I loved this article. Haven't had to think about different shirt names in years. I suspect that we categorize button-front "men's style" shirts (dress shirts, guayaberas, aloha shirts) differently from knit shirts (t-shirts, polo shirts, turtlenecks). In Australia, turtlenecks are "polos," cardigan sweaters are "jumpers," pullovers are "pullovers," sweatshirt tops are "sweaters," and undershirts are "skivvies." Oh — athletic shoes are "trainers," and swimsuits are "bathers."
Toggle Commented Jul 28, 2009 on Button, Button at Fritinancy
Thanks for this post. I heard Dr. Kessler on NPR, and his theory rings true for me. Re stimulus/i, I would have rephrased: "They [fat, sugar, salt] are very stimulating, and they become the most salient stimuli."
Toggle Commented Jul 13, 2009 on Word of the Week: Hyperpalatable at Fritinancy
Free speech is wonderful, isn't it. Thanks so much for a reminder on this Independence Day....
Toggle Commented Jul 3, 2009 on O Beautiful for Magazines at Fritinancy
As an active tweeter, I was confused by the initial report. I'm glad to learn that apps like TweetDeck and Tweetie won't be affected, and neither will those of us who tweet regularly. I really appreciate your thorough explanation, especially the advice regarding domains. And thanks to Bob Cumbow, too, for his reminder that "trademark" is a noun.
Toggle Commented Jul 2, 2009 on The Shady Side of the Tweet at Fritinancy
Like Nick, my first thought was WOW! So that's what I looked up, and I am even more wowed! I always considered Erin McKean to be amazing, but Wordnik is truly exceptional. Thank you so much for letting us all know about it, plus giving us some of the inside scoop.
Toggle Commented Jun 9, 2009 on Word of the Week: Lexicographer at Fritinancy
Thank you for three years of witty observation and commentary. I'm delighted to say that I've been reading your blog for almost the entire time, and I am definitely looking forward to many more years of your blog (and Tweets, too).
Toggle Commented Jun 9, 2009 on Bloggiversary 3 at Fritinancy
Great post, but definitely an unfortunate name. I actually thought that it might be a portmanteau of "smart" and "stub" (a short article in need of expansion), but that doesn't really improve it.
Toggle Commented Jun 3, 2009 on Bad Brand Names: Smub at Fritinancy
President Obama and the First Lady never cease to amaze me with their intelligence, sophistication, and wit. I'm sure that there are some writers in the West Wing who are providing the words, but they couldn't do it for just anyone....
Toggle Commented May 15, 2009 on Who Needs Another Sheepskin? at verbatim
Just when I had a fabulous new product name: ShareFlux! Or was it FluxShare? Great post, and I'm looking forward to the VT article.
Toggle Commented May 14, 2009 on The No-No Zone at Fritinancy
Great post, Nancy. Not only do you find the most interesting examples, but your analysis is always spot-on. I agree with Tanita: Although my eyes saw "infegy," my brain read "effigy." (But then, I am just slightly dyslexic.)
Toggle Commented May 13, 2009 on Bad Brand Names: Infegy at Fritinancy
I'd love to know what you think of POPULOUS, the new name for the group that used to be HOK Sport+Venue+Event (the market leader in design of downtown baseball stadia).
Toggle Commented May 11, 2009 on Bad Brand Names: Blellow at Fritinancy