This is Nicola Cornick's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Nicola Cornick's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Nicola Cornick
I write Regency historicals for Harlequin HQN Books and also work as a historian
Recent Activity
Image
Nicola here. Last week I was lucky enough to be on holiday in the Scottish Highlands, staying in a historic cottage above the town of Braemar. There aren’t many things that I have in common with the Queen, but for a few days we were within 20 miles of each other as Braemar is just down the road from Balmoral Castle! Our cottage however, whilst very comfortable indeed, was a lot smaller than the royal residence although just as interesting historically. Braemar too is an absolutely fascinating little town with a hugely interesting history and I had the treat of... Continue reading
Posted Jun 9, 2021 at Word Wenches
16
Image
Nicola here. I’m away from my desk on a research trip at the moment so I’ve pulled up and re-written an old Wench classic post from more than ten years ago which I really enjoyed writing at the time and which feels appropriate all over again at the moment as we approach Royal Oak Day on May 29th. Here in the Northern hemisphere the flowers and the trees are starting to look very lush as spring is slipping into summer. In the past couple of years I think I’ve been more aware than previously of the environment around me because... Continue reading
Posted May 26, 2021 at Word Wenches
22
Image
Nicola here. I was very interested in Wench Andrea’s blog a week or so ago about Dukes, and the reality of dukes and dukedoms as opposed to what we see on film and read about in books. This prompted me to think about duchesses, particularly as a new podcast called “Duchess” started recently. It’s a show that explores the inspiring women who are running the stately home of Britain. In it, Emma Manners, the Duchess of Rutland, travels the country and talks to a variety of women about their lives caring for historic houses. It’s quite an eye-opening listen (if... Continue reading
Posted May 12, 2021 at Word Wenches
23
Image
Nicola here. After long winter months of bad weather and lock down, the idea of going to the beach for some fresh sea air to blow away the cobwebs was irresistible and so last week we took a trip to Norfolk (UK) and to a little seaside village called Sea Palling on the East coast. Maybe it’s because I’ve always lived a long way away from the sea that I often have a longing to see the ocean. A lot of us love it, I know; there’s something so soothing about the surge and fall of the waves and so... Continue reading
Posted Apr 26, 2021 at Word Wenches
30
Image
Nicola here and today I’m talking about curtains. I think the topic popped into my mind when I was lying awake early this morning reflecting on the fact that now it’s lighter in the mornings, I’m going to need to get some thicker curtains to ensure I get my required eight hours sleep! Either that or I could resort to what our ancestors did and have a curtained bed instead of curtains at the window (or both.) It fascinates me to think that we are still using a way of keeping light out and warmth in that was invented hundreds... Continue reading
Posted Apr 16, 2021 at Word Wenches
26
Image
Nicola here! Today is St Patrick’s Day, the feast day of the patron saint of Ireland, and if you’ve read Wench Susan’s post earlier in the week you will already be in the mood to celebrate with a pint of Guinness and some delicious soda bread! Whilst the harp is the official symbol of Ireland, found everywhere from Guinness glasses to official coinage, the shamrock is another symbol that is as widely recognised and popular. It is said that this little sprig of green was important to the druids and that St Patrick used it to explain the concept of... Continue reading
Posted Mar 17, 2021 at Word Wenches
14
Image
Nicola here. I imagine that a lot of people are, like me, missing their visits to historical houses and heritage sites, and can’t wait for a time when we can all go out and enjoy them again. Country house visiting has, of course, been a hobby for tourists for hundreds of years. One of the best descriptions of it in fiction comes from Pride and Prejudice, when Lizzie Bennett, in company with her aunt and uncle, visits Pemberley on their trip to Derbyshire. They are shown round by the housekeeper, giving Lizzie the chance to reflect on the house she... Continue reading
Posted Mar 3, 2021 at Word Wenches
20
Image
Nicola here. Yesterday was Shrove Tuesday or Pancake Day, a date that is a particular favourite of mine for two reasons, firstly because my husband and I had our first date over a pile of homemade pancakes on a Shrove Tuesday long ago and secondly because, well, I just love pancakes. Here is a picture of yesterday's feast! In the Christian tradition the 40 days of Lent, which begin today, are a time of prayers and fasting, abstaining from a whole range of foods, including meat, eggs, fish, fats and milk. Shrove Tuesday itself was the day you were summoned... Continue reading
Posted Feb 17, 2021 at Word Wenches
30
We are of one mind, Christina! I too have lined wellington boots although mine are Dunlop not Hunter. My last Hunter wellies I wore until they literally fell apart,I loved them so much. The cosiness of having a fur lining!
Toggle Commented Feb 1, 2021 on What To Wear In the Rain? at Word Wenches
1 reply
Vicki, you are so well prepared! Your hats sounds absolutely fabulous. I hadn't heard of a fleece gaiter and looked it up. Turns out I have one although I'm not sure what it's called here! Anyway, they are superb.
Toggle Commented Feb 1, 2021 on What To Wear In the Rain? at Word Wenches
1 reply
Annette, I do love the idea of running outside to dance in the rain when you've been in a drought. We don't feel like that often around here! I also love your FEMA umbrella story. That is very touching. Interesting that your dog loves the towel. So does Angus, but April hates it and has to be bribed not to fight with it!
Toggle Commented Feb 1, 2021 on What To Wear In the Rain? at Word Wenches
1 reply
Hi Kathryn, I'm with you on needing both hands for dog walking sometimes. That sounds like me with April! I can imagine an umbrella going flying when the dog suddenly veers off to investigate something exciting...
Toggle Commented Feb 1, 2021 on What To Wear In the Rain? at Word Wenches
1 reply
Oh. Teresa, I am with you on the glasses! (And the dripping umbrella). With the advent of masks we glasses-wearers now have the dual issue of steaming up and raindrop glasses!
Toggle Commented Feb 1, 2021 on What To Wear In the Rain? at Word Wenches
1 reply
Image
Nicola here. Today I'm talking about some of the things people in the 18th and 19th centuries did when they stayed in the the country (the respectable activities, I mean, rather than the complicated business of creeping in and out of bedrooms in the dead of night. I'm talking here about the leisured classes, of course, the ones who didn't distinguish between a week day and the weekend. This may be a Wench re-post; because of stuff I have going on at the moment I've had to dust down and add to a piece I'd written a while ago, but... Continue reading
Posted Feb 1, 2021 at Word Wenches
23
Image
Nicola here, rambling (literally) today on what to wear for a dog walk in the rain and adding in some historical sidenotes. Each day I go out with Angus, our pet Labrador, or April, our guide dog trainee in the inclement winter weather, generally getting soaking wet in the process. This has prompted me refine my outdoor wear to suit the different elements of winter – frost, snow and wind as well as rain – and make sure that I have the right clothes for the right activity, because you know the saying: “There’s no wrong sort of weather, only... Continue reading
Posted Jan 25, 2021 at Word Wenches
26
Fascinating post, Christina. I really enjoyed it. I have read all of Heyer's mystery books and enjoyed them to a greater or lesser degree (Envious Casca being my least favourite and No Wind of Blame probably my favourite.) I do agree there's a sense of snobbishness and claustrophobia about them that feels very alien today. I think it was probably very accurate for the period though. I've only been "buttled" once or twice so have no real experience but I used to know a lady who had grown up in a big castle with servants in Scotland who told a story from her youth. One day, the after-dinner coffee was late arriving by about ten minutes and when the butler had finally distributed it he went up to her father and said with a completely wooden expression: "I do apologise for the delay, my lord. Cook died."
Toggle Commented Jan 22, 2021 on Why Shoot a Butler? at Word Wenches
1 reply
What a lovely idea, Kathleen. Cake and books is the perfect combination!
Toggle Commented Jan 15, 2021 on Regency Twelfth Cake! at Word Wenches
1 reply
Image
Nicola here, introducing this month’s Ask A Wench topic, which was sent in by Valerie Moore, who wins a book from me as a thank you. Valerie asks: “How do the seasons affect your style of writing, if at all?” It’s an excellent question and gave us all much to ponder on. Do the seasons affect our actual writing style or is it more that the seasons affect our moods and this affects our writing? Certainly in my case, I find it extremely difficult to write about a season that is very different from the one that I’m in. At... Continue reading
Posted Jan 15, 2021 at Word Wenches
14
Image
Nicola here. It’s Twelfth Night today, marking the end of the Christmas festivities (assuming that you count the twelve days from Christmas Day. Some traditions start counting on 26th December meaning you can keep partying until the 6th!) There are a number of different ways in which Twelfth Night has been celebrated through the centuries. In the Georgian period they were keen on baking a special cake to mark the occasion. The Historic Food website has some fascinating information on this. The earliest printed recipe for an English Twelfth Cake appears to date from 1803 and was recorded by John... Continue reading
Posted Jan 5, 2021 at Word Wenches
21
Image
Nicola here, welcoming you to the Word Wench "What We’re Reading" feature for December. It’s a bumper edition, including both Christmas-themed and other books, so jump right in and check out our choices, and let us know what you recommend this month! Anne here, and as usual I've read quite a bit in the last month and have several recommendations. The first is The Authenticity Project by Clare Pooley. Elderly artist, Julian Jessop is lonely and unhappy and, claiming that authenticity is the only possible solution for changing his life, he writes down how he feels in a small exercise... Continue reading
Posted Dec 31, 2020 at Word Wenches
23
Image
Nicola here. At this time of year when the evenings are long and dark and the days are short there is nothing that I enjoy more than seeing a light show. If there is snow (or at least a hard frost!) and stars sparkling overhead that’s an added bonus. Perhaps its’ a throwback to the distant ancestors who lit up this time of year with a number of fire festivals: Samhain, Halloween, All Souls and Guy Fawkes Night, all with bonfires and lanterns. The precursor of Christmas lights were the candles that German families would attach to the branches of... Continue reading
Posted Dec 21, 2020 at Word Wenches
20
Hi anne! That's such a funny story about you reading in class - it sounds as though there was just no way of stopping you!
Toggle Commented Dec 4, 2020 on The Reading Woman at Word Wenches
1 reply
Hi Annette! What a fantastic idea for a screensaver! I hadn't thought of doing that but I love it!
Toggle Commented Dec 4, 2020 on The Reading Woman at Word Wenches
1 reply
Karin, isn't it wonderful to have such a variety of interesting and relaxing places to read!
Toggle Commented Dec 4, 2020 on The Reading Woman at Word Wenches
1 reply
I'm so glad you liked the post and the pictures, Teresa. There are so many beautiful reading women paintings to choose from!
Toggle Commented Dec 4, 2020 on The Reading Woman at Word Wenches
1 reply