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UncleRobert
Crowthorne, Berks
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It's also worth noting that, just as Microsoft never admits to competition from Linux, which is better, safer and cheaper, neither does Gordon admit that better policies exist.
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Have you ever read Machiavelli's "The Prince"? This is a classic demonstration of Machiavellian thought. Rather than helping the poor, Labour concentrate on being seen to help, and thereby perpetuate the myth.
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If you want social justice and crime fighting in one you could clarify the law on reasonable force. It could be made to read something like this: If you are burgling, and the householder fetches you one round the ear'ole with a four-by-two, it's your lookout sunshine. There'll be no compensation, no sympathy and if you want to try and sue we can all 'ave a larf at yer. Well, perhaps not quite like that, but you get the general idea.
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Does Dawkins really exist?
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From the lost eighth chronicle of Narnia. I found Susan Pavensie in a beach bar in Florida, sipping a Mai Tai. "Peter was a tory all his life," she said. "It goes with being High King. Edmund was definitely labour, and in favour of the white witch's redistribution policy." "We are talking about the same witch?" "Yes. Her redistribution policy was to turn anyone she didn't like to stone with her wand, and steal all their property. She had a wolf to do the spin doctoring as well." "What happened when Edmund met Aslan?" "He saw how wrong he'd been and joined the Conservatives. Lucy was a green and talked to trees, until she grew up. Another conservative now." "And you? You tried to resign from the friends of Narnia." "To damn right, kiddo. The books say I stopped believing. I didn't. There came a time when I realised that if I stayed in I'd have to keep saving an imaginary country with no inside plumbing. But if I dropped out Aslan would find some other kid to do the difficult bits." "So you were prepared to sponge off Gill and Eustace." "Benefit culture. Too right. Let someone else do the work. That's the new labour way." "And now?" "Put all my money in a Calormene Crescent hedge fund, didn't I? Gordon's made even that collapse, so this is my last week in Florida. Ill tell you one thing, if I have to come back I'm damn well voting tory." I left her ordering another Mai Tai. All worlds may or may not lead to Aslan's country, but it seems all experience leads to voting blue.
Toggle Commented Jul 24, 2009 on Abracadabra at CentreRight
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There's something strange here. Electrifying Brunel's billiard table, the main line with the shallowest gradients in the UK, but then stopping before you get to the steep bit is slightly odd. Stopping at Newbury is even odder. You'd almost think the thing had been decided by a politician who knew bog all about how to run a railway. Oh, it was?
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The computer attributions seem to have wandered off into cyberspace: Charles Babbage - Victorian mathematician and designer of mechanical computers that were never finished but, as subsequent reconstruction has proved, would have worked perfectly. Alan Turing - Mathematician and codebreaker, whose 1936 paper on computable numbers demonstrated what computers could and couldn't do. Sir Maurice Wilkes - Built in Cambridge the EDSAC-I, the first practical, as opposed to proof of concept, computer. Also invented microcode. Martin Richards - Creator of BCPL which is the grandfather of almost all modern programming languages. Tim Berners-Lee - Inventor of the world-wide web. Plus there are some scientists and engineers who should not be forgotten: Isaac Newton - Mathematician and scientist James Brindley - Canal builder Thomas Telford - Civil engineer, the "Colossus of Roads." James Newcomen - Steam engine designer James Watt - Made Newcomen's engines efficient. Isambard Kingdom Brunel - Civil engineer and inventor Daniel Gooch - Made engines work on Brunel's lines. Charles Algernon Parsons - Inventor of the steam turbine. Frank Whittle - Gas turbine (jet engine). Crick and Watson - Discovered DNA structure. That's just a few. There are lots more.
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Should parents sue councils who lie about why the schools are bad?
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How to lose friends and irritate voters. The government says, "You should make provision for your old age". The taxpayer replies, "From what, you've already taken most of my money in tax?" The taxpayer goes off, muttering, and manages to scrape together some savings. Labour gets in and says, "Look, a rich person! Quick, change the tax laws to confiscate his savings!" The taxpayer tries to stay drunk until the Conservatives get in again. Then he scrapes together some more small savings. This pattern repeats until the taxpayer retires. The local authority then says, "Oooh look, savings! Off with his benefits!" Once the savings are all gone the local authority doesn't restore the benefits because they have lost the file. Once beaten over the head with a stick the local authority pays the benefits to the (now starving) taxpayer. At this point the taxpayer's offspring gets involved. TP now needs an operation, only there is a 3 year waiting list. According to Labour accounting this is only 2 weeks, but they don't start the clock unless you can turn up in person to prove you are dead. The reason for the delay is that the NHS has no money. TP says that it has a lot of his. It turns out that all the tax TP has paid has not been providing for his old age, but paying the interest on gilts. Offspring pays for the operation. TP dies of a broken heart, the system having robbed him of not only his money but the will to live as well. Offspring says "A plague on both your houses" and votes BNP. The moral of the story. The only way to get people to save is to guarantee that saving works. Savings must be protected from predatory administrations and inflation. And that may well mean a new Magna Carta.
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In parts of Florida quite a few officials way neatly tailored, uniform, shorts. They look good and have a professional air.
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If cuts are inevitable what steps will be taken to identify and eliminate waste and unnecessary spending before reducing services?
Toggle Commented Jun 29, 2009 on Any questions for you? at thetorydiary
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The way I see this is that if a football side is doing badly you don't field the second team, you buy players. (Reading Royals please take note.)
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The problem is one of continuity of supply. Once there were a lot of slate quarries in Wales, and the narrow gauge railways were built to bring the slate down from the mountains, initially to the sea, then to the Cambrian Coast railway, which took it on to the Midlands, or via the GWR to London via the Thames valley. The old GWR route is still "slate alley". If you know where to look there are loads of slate roofs still in position. Then the miners, possibly quite justifiably, went on strike. When they got back they found that a trade in cheaper imported slate had grown up, and the quarries progressively closed. The full story is in LTC Rolt's "Railway Adventure", the story of the early preservation movement. Similarly in the 60s and 70s, when we couldn't get structural steel out of BSC for months because of industrial disputes, we the engineers went to Sweden. There's never been that good a reason to come back. The point is that when you go on strike you may hurt the management a bit, but you hurt the customers far more. And customers can vote with their money.
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Introducing facts to this debate rather spoils the sport, like shooting someone else's fox. Everyone on the left knows that everything in the world was Mrs. T's fault, just like pyramids sharpen razor blades, and the moon is made of cheese.
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That's easy enough to do. Make it harder to get credit that you can't afford, and abolish inheritance tax so you can pass savings on. At the same time do away with means testing of benefits for the elderly. In short, enact a new Magna Carta with one (1) clause. "The government, regardless of how deep the poo it is in, may not steal people's savings."
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What you'll find is that a lot of people are "buttresses of the party," they have supported it from the outside for years. Now they know what it's like to run a company in the face of endless form-filling or treat patents when there are targets to be met. Now they have some chance to come inside and do a power of good. The New Blue Crew will shake up a lot of the incompetence and waste that plagues this country. They? Perhaps I should have said we...
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I started work, straight out of university, in 1977. The electronics industry was packing up and leaving for America, unable to fight the headwind of taxation. Then Mrs. T got in, and we began to rebuild the electronics industry. I spent a decade developing digital television, and at the end there was a factory near here employing dozens of people making the kit I'd worked on. Once Blair got in there were changes in the licencing, the electronics industry went downhill again and that was it. The factory is now a housing estate and the jobs have gone to Japan. I know who I think should apologise.
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Apologise? Perhaps the trade union barons who had a policy of going on strike at the drop of a red flag throughout the pre-Thatcher decade might consider their position first. Here is a short quiz. What do you remember about: The closed shop. Rota disconnections. The unburied dead. Secondary picketing. Grunwick. The three day week. Hospital picketing. The 98% tax rate.
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A lot of us did. I was a member of DECUS for many years and swapped endless software through the free DECUS library while Torvalds was still at school. The way I see the problem is that the political system doesn't lend itself to people who have had a career working in industry having a second career in politics. Because of this we suffer with politicians who have no clear idea of how the industries their decisions affect really work. And that's why they get sold IT projects that would make the Emperor's new clothes look like severe overdressing. I have hopes that great things will come from David Cameron's open list policy. Get a few engineers in the commons and we'll soon fix the economy.
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It's interesting to note that Amazon, Google and almost all the other successes use open source software, including Linux, extensively. It may be significant that section 7 of the "Digital Britain" report doesn't seem to mention open source at all. Draw your own conclusions.
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My sympathies are with David. He's got something that's big and running well, which means that labour want to nationalise it. It's enough to scare anyone into an unguarded comment.
Toggle Commented Jun 22, 2009 on Cameron: Bercow is not a Tory!@£$! at thetorydiary
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It's probably more efficient than trying to force the fox to fill in a risk assessment and wear goggles before eating a free-range chicken.
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I can hear the sigh of relief from the farming community who can now look forward to being able to control foxes again.
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The problem with inheritance tax is that it catches small businesses if the owner dies unexpectedly, for example in an accident. In this case what can happen is that the business is valued as a going concern on the basis of the profit is was making before the proprietor died. Once he goes the few employees quite possibly can't keep it going, and it can't be sold for enough to meet the IT bill, so it is wound up. In short IT takes money out of small enterprises at the exact moment they need to have it put in. Inheritance Tax is a major cause of unemployment. If you want something high-profile to cut, why not rent out Portcullis House and make do with a few portakabins until it's over?
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At Bingley railway station is a sign saying "This platform for trains to Skipton Keithley and beyond." Beyond in this case means "over the Pennines." Enough said.
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