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CJT
Lancaster
History graduate; ex-teacher; lifelong Tory; resting councillor; RC
Interests: American History; travel, flying and cruising; philately; cricket; music (classical and opera); languages; liturgy; housing; environment.
Recent Activity
But we seem to be in a cojones deficit situation and I can't see the present Parliament passing the legislation you want, even if the cojones were available in abundance!
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The trouble is that the Tories have NOT taken over. We have effectively a Lib Dem government with people like Cable and Huhne calling the shots. Even Tory Ministers seem to be determined to preserve this state of affairs until 2015 at least and don't so far evince the guts to tell Clegg and friends to either support meaningful measures to promote growth or face a General Election soon.
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People do see the light, you know. On the other hand careerists without principle tend to join whatever party will give them the best chance of some sort of power and status. We even saw a couple of ex-'Thatcherite' 'No Turning Back' types join 'New' Labour when it suited them. And don't forget dear Quentin Davies.
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Because Clegg has lost the ability to bring down the government any time soon, it's time for Cameron to flex his muscles rather than let Clegg and Cable come out with the comments you report unpunished. That he doesn't makes him look either scared or like a crypto Lib-Dem himself. I have been saying this ever since the AV referendum.
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Our current policy seems to be to de-industrialise our economy to no-one's benefit but that of countries like China and India, who will churn out CO2 until the cows come home. At the same time we inflate our own energy costs by building inefficient wind turbines, many, at sea, massively vulnerable to attack and also requiring onshore conventional back-up for when the wind doesn't blow. I can't believe that we can or should go on damaging ourselves in this way.
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Where are the figures for Cameron? Did we leave him off the poll or are we suppressing the awful reality?
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In the event of full fiscal integration, even fullER integration, a Referendum should be held as to whether UK citizens would support our continued membership of the EU. Sooner or later our position inside the Union but outside the Euro becomes untenable and our costs incurred in sustaining it become unsustainable. Time to wake up and smell the cappucino!
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The real problem is this. In order to 'detoxify the brand' and 'show that we've changed' Cameron ring fenced the NHS, increased Overseas Aid, and is wasting Lord knows how much on useless windmills. These are his priorities because they are the priorities of the 'Liberal' media establishment whose approval he craves. Thanks to what this government has done to aircraft carriers, Harriers etc. and a Strategic Defence Review conducted in ludicrous haste, we cannot perform as we should even in Libya. I note that Argentina is now investigating having a nuclear sub of its own. I wonder why and has anybody told our friend on his hols in Tuscany?
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This cat has lived most of its life waiting for a Conservative government. I think I'm still waiting! On that, Mr. Angry, you and I are completely of one mind.
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I agree with you Elaine. But while we remain wedded to the LDs - and Cameron seems to be determined to give in to them at every turn to keep this 'coalition' in being - we will never be able to do otherwise. That's why support for the Coalition is falling and support for Cameron is falling with it. After the local elections (and referendum and Scottish and Welsh elections) Cameron was in a very strong position to make the LDs support our policies. He could have threatened them with a GE otherwise and I can't see any of them wanting that with their poll support in single figures. But he blew it, leaving quite a lot of people I talk to with the impression that he is really not a Conservative at heart himself and is using the Coalition as a defensive wall between himself and the Conservative Party.
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Perhaps you haven't met that many real Tories. You should get out more! We were too keen to effectively write off the Commonwealth in the 1970s even after De Gaulle said 'Non!' But Britain's interests are global not just continental, which is how the Commonwealth came to be in the first place. Things change but this fact hasn't changed for centuries. Incidentally we are surrounded by water and and a lot of our trade with the rest of the world travels by sea. For which reason we need ships and a Navy to protect ourselves, and aircraft carriers with planes on the them! Would the PM please note this?
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Perhaps Mr. Balls should be held personally accountable for his actions that day and the damages be paid by him! That would be REAL accountability!
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Martin, I'm afraid that the 1940s shibboleth about 'free at the point of need' will have to go sooner or later. Why? Partly because it simply isn't affordable and risks bankrupting the country. Moreover, such a scheme can never be truly patient centred. Under our NHS, as established by the Labour party in the era of rationing, patients are realy just clients receiving whatever a vast army of petty bureaucrats decides they can have. This applies even in such small things as fixing up appointments to see the GP, how much notice you have to give (often several days) if you need a repeat prescription for long term medication etc. Rationing runs through every aspect of it in ways not now found in any other aspect of life in Britain or in any other country whose health services I have had occasion to use.
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The ballot Paper doesn't mention equalisation of constituencies. Labour, of course, are dead against that.
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How do you square the rest of your post with your initial statement that 'he's a pretty good PM'?
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It's a pity that so many decent Conservative councillors will have to suffer for this man's ineptitude. Quite a few in Greater London already suffered for the election 'campaign' (especially the 3 sided broadcasts) a year ago.
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The problem is that Cameron doesn't come across as trustworthy. When he became leader he took a delight in kicking many of his own supporters (or, rather, the party's) to show that we had 'changed'. Then he and his friends seemed to adopt a lot of New Labour thinking including on economics, when that was plainly wrong. When it led inevitably to an almighty bust he was less than credible as a critic on account of this. Now he's back to headline grabbing kicking again. Last year he attacked the Pakistanis in India. Last week he attacked the UK in Pakistan and now he's attacking Oxford on the basis of, presumably, something said by David Lammy last year which was disproved at the time. Natural Prime Minister? I think not. A period of reflective silence is called for. I have defended him in the past - but no more.
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I even recall that happening to some of my own contemporaries in Lancashire and Westmorland in the 1950s!
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Having taught for 32 years, mostly in an inner London all-ability school I can say that school sport is one weapon in the armoury of teachers who are trying to improve pupils' achievements academically by improving their sense of self-worth and instilling into them a spirit of aspiration. Running cricket teams and taking an intelligent interest in their Rugby and athletics, gave me an insight into my pupils that the classroom alone could not provide. It also gave them a chance to see me as a more rounded character than the man who came into their classroom for 45 minutes two or three times a week and marked their homework.
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Which is why I have often found myself saying 'Don't blame me; I voted for David Davis!'
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You're not a Liberal - you're Keir-Hardie. Of course, I don't really think you mean it!
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The next Euro election is is 2014. This cat has an intuition that British politics will look very different by then! An odd twitch of the whiskers tells me so. My whiskers are not at all tuned to horse racing, so I can't help you over Cheltenham!
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This 'solution' was advocated originally by a Tory backbencher. It's superficially attractive, I grant you, but it won't work. We didn't want devolution but the constitutional illiterates (CI) didn't think it mattered so we got it anyway. This has created the English Question which DC has done nothing whatever to address, leaving constitutional matters as a toy for his CI Lib Dem deputy to play with in true Blairite fashion. The only way to address the English Question is either to dismantle devolution altogether or to give England rights on a par with Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. A federal UK in short. I prefer the former, but would settle for the latter as preserving the UK better than the present mess.
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This cat would like to point out to nonny mouse that Inter-Government aid has a poor track record when it comes to feeding the hungry. It is better at buying weapons and Mercedes for dictators. If you want to feed starving people do what lots of Christians and other already do and give money out of your own pocket to the numerous organisations that exist in this country to do just that. You could also campaign for more liberal trading laws to stimulate enterprise and agriculture in the countries affected.
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Hate to disagree with you but I must point out that current law prevents persons or organisations with a religious connection from acting in accordance with their conscientiously held beliefs in the public arena. Take the Catholic adoption agencies as a case in point. It's not persecution in the sense of killing people - yet, but it isn't freedom of conscience either. Equalities legislation is taken to trump liberty of conscience every time - ask the Court of Appeal! However I agree with the original proposition that we shouldn't be using our taxes to prop up regimes that practise persecution of minority religions. Our soldiers who fought and died in Iraq didn't do so to let Sunni Muslims persecute Shiites, Christians and Kurds with a freedom denied them under Saddam Hussein, and our aid shouldn't be financing similar persecutors in Pakistan or anywhere. I'd prefer to scrap most of the overseas aid budget and spend the savings on putting planes on our aircraft carriers and training the pilots to fly them. Then we might be able to make a difference in Libya instead of just posturing ineffectually.
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