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Paula Jones
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But Lou, you just need to hear about our next new product! (Couldn't resist) Wait - the paid journalists are supposed to cover new products - but who's paying for the journalists? Fewer and fewer companies, that's for sure.
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I miss the days of Marty Gold and Electronic News, when he would get a scoop and investigate it. He'd call every week because he had heard there was going to be a big deal between VLSI Technology and Hitachi (there was). I miss giving Joe Fowler, our PR guy, brownie points if he could give Cirrus Logic more ink in a competitor's announcement because editors would actually call us up, as a competitor, for comment. Now news goes out and people accept it as "fact" when someone says they have the fastest, lowest power, etc. Often there's not even proof of that (competitive specs) in the press releases. Glad you're asking some questions!
Toggle Commented Jul 27, 2009 on Getting back to basics at Communications Basics
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Agreed. Like it or not, everyone can be a "journalist" by starting a blog - and I like it because I get all sorts of useful info from these blogs. I don't like it because "real" journalists have lost their jobs. The investigative reporting of yesterday is just about gone. But back to DAC...yes, the bloggers should get free passes so they can write about DAC and continue to promote it.
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True, reporting has always been biased, even when Walter Chronkite did it and we all agreed with him. The big difference indeed is that now we all have a voice. In the "old" days you had to be pretty rich to start your own newspaper. Now access is almost free. You just need time...and again the richest have the most time, it seems. And the networks - they've dummied down the news so much everyone has to agree with them. Just look at the bizarre human interest stories that pass as news, and ask yourself when did you last see a reporter from another country on the news?
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Amen!
Toggle Commented Jun 18, 2009 on Well somebody gets it. at Communications Basics
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Hi Lou, About what it will do to company news releases. I don't know if this will really change anything. Most press releases don't contain enough info (just un-backed up facts) that I'm not sure there will be enough for a lawsuit. I'd be more worried about the technical info on the web sites than the press releases. Most companies put up their data sheets on their web sites - does this mean they can be sued for data sheet "mistakes." Oh, another excuse to pay the lawyers... Paula
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Luv ya, too! Keep on your campaigns - we really enjoy your writing. Paula
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Brian, I actually drove the effort and did the installation (with the help of a consultant) of Salesforce.com, which promises to give us this front-end lead-gen system tied to the sales pipeline. After using it for just over a year, I can highly recommend it. However, our budget is so small that I can't give a quantitative analysis of the effectiveness of different marketing activities. Plus, you need to measure advertising and PR on an awareness scale, not a lead gen scale. The biggest advantage of using Salesforce.com to me is that now I can be my own publisher and easily email info out to people who have inquiried about our products through various things we've done. For Sales, they have one place to go to quickly get any sales leads that come in. It's very efficient.
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Hi Lou, I know that a big part of the reason that trade shows were kept in the marketing budget was that the ROI was much easier to gauge. You have face-to-face meetings with key people, and that is much better than an anonymous "impression." But now things are so tight, as the number of IC design starts dwindles (therefore the amount of tools and IP bought has decreased) that everything is being looked at very carefully. Our budgets, which used to be spent mostly in the US, with some in Japan and Europe, now must be stretched to cover Taiwan, Korea and China. On top of that, engineers can get the info they need most of the time directly from the Internet. So it will be interesting to see how the Internet model changes trade shows and conferences. No, I'm not talking about a "virtual trade show." Who wants to go see a bunch of virtual booths? Instead, I think that virtual technical conferences are a much better idea - and if those can get corporate sponsorships (at a much better rate than we'd ever have to pay for a real booth) that could be a viable business. I'm not nearly as worried about the demise of trade shows as I am about the near demise of journalism. Journalists wrote stories and investigated - at least in the old days. These days about all they have time for is rewriting press releases. That's very sad....
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