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WPWI
As a development professional and humanitarian, I am passionately committed to women's philanthropy--women's issues, especially the healing, prevention and elimination of abuse and violence against women and children.
Interests: Strengthening and empowering non-profit leadership and senor management; creating and maintaining organizational effectiveness for long-term sustainability
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WEDO. Vision & Mission As a global women’s advocacy organization, WEDO envisions a just world that promotes and protects human rights, gender equality and the integrity of the environment. Mission To contribute toward its vision for the world, WEDO’s mission is to ensure that women’s rights; social, economic and environmental justice; and sustainable development principles-as well as the linkages between them-are at the heart of global and national policies, programs and practices. Approach WEDO views strong and diverse partnerships as integral to meeting its goals. It allies with women’s organizations; environmental, development and human rights organizations; governments; and intergovernmental organizations, including the United Nations, to achieve its mission. WEDO’s core competency has been high-level advocacy in international arenas, while building bridges among a range of stakeholders. Goals WEDO works on a range of cross-cutting issues—from climate change and natural resource management, to global governance and finance and UN reform—toward three interlinked goals: Research and raising awareness, fostering and facilitating networks and campaigns, and building capacity and training—with women and women’s organizations, gender advocates, government and UN actors, and many others—comprise strategies to meet WEDO’s goals. While WEDO works at the international level primarily, it supports regional and national stakeholders, networks and governments to turn policy commitments on gender equality into action—striving to improve the lives of women and men around the world. There are many ways you can help us and join us, including making a donation, joining our newsletter list (see the link to the right), and taking action. Continue reading
Posted Aug 3, 2013 at Women's Philanthropy--Women's Issues
Nonprofit Institute (NonprofitInstit) on Twitter. Nonprofit Institute @NonprofitInstit follows you High-impact training to help individuals, Nonprofits and communities of faith improve the quality of services to their constituency. University of Pennsylvania · facebook.com/nonprofitinsti… Continue reading
Posted Aug 3, 2013 at Women's Philanthropy--Women's Issues
Home - Mama Cash. she's Mama Cash her vision & mission her themes her core values others about her in women's groups in women's funds apply for a grant examples of groups Red Umbrella Fund with cash with effort Mama Cash news publications press Women's rights news Exhibit on sex worker rights her team her partners working for her her address (who is she?) > she's Mama Cash Mama Cash invests in women's rights >> everybody benefits from women's rights >> Mama Cash has the CBF accreditation for charities >> Mama Cash funds pioneering initiatives >> want to learn more? >> Mama Cash invests in women's rights Mama Cash is the oldest international women's fund - established in the Netherlands in 1983. She supports pioneering and innovative women's initiatives around the world, because she believes that social change starts with women and girls. Since 1983, Mama Cash has awarded more than €37,000,000 to advance women's and girls’ human rights. She is active in Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, and the Commonwealth of Independent States. (she changes the world) ... and you can join her! Read about the women's groups Mama Cash supports >> everybody benefits from women's rights Worldwide women strive against poverty, violence and discrimination. They strive for equal rights, economic justice and a safe environment for themselves and their communities - often with little financial means and with admirable dedication. Mama Cash supports these women because she believes that everybody - women, men, and children - benefits from investments in women's rights and bettering the position of women. In other words: Mama Cash believes in the power and ability of women to change the world. Mama Cash has the CBF accreditation for charities Mama Cash is careful with her money. For years she has had Dutch CBF accreditation, a guarantee that donations are well spent. To get this accreditation Mama Cash has to meet stringent criteria. One important condition is that at least 75% of the income be spent on organisational aims. Mama Cash has always been able to meet this condition. Mama Cash funds pioneering initiatives Mama Cash is positive, energetic and powerful - but not everybody's friend. She says and does what others (some times) don't dare. She inspires. She stands for social change and seeks pioneering, taboo-breaking, often risky initiatives - schemes that larger funds can't or won't back.... Continue reading
Posted Aug 3, 2013 at Women's Philanthropy--Women's Issues
Women's Voices. Women Vote Action Fund | Home. Continue reading
Posted Aug 3, 2013 at Women's Philanthropy--Women's Issues
The Stelter Company. Who We Are Our Mission We Are The Personal Philanthropy Company The mission of The Stelter Company is to assist charitable organizations nationwide in accomplishing their missions by writing, designing, producing and distributing high-quality direct mail newsletters, collateral material and Internet-based products. In addition, through our knowledgeable field consulting staff, we will help organizations to determine their marketing needs and recommend appropriate solutions and strategies. Our home office staff will follow through to provide the best quality products and customer service. + More Our Culture Getting to the Heart of the Matter We are a family business community where people come first. We are committed to making a difference in our partnerships with our clients and in the lives of our employees. + More Our History A Family Business Committed to Making a Difference From the vision, courage and persistence of one man, The Stelter Company was born. Today, this growing business has flourished into a respected leader in planned giving marketing communications for nonprofit organizations across the United States. Still, the company remains true to its roots—a family business committed to its mission and its relationship with each and every client. + More Continue reading
Posted Aug 3, 2013 at Women's Philanthropy--Women's Issues
blackgivesback: Black Philanthropy Month 2013: August Brings Time to Recall, Reckon and Right. Thursday, August 1, 2013 Black Philanthropy Month 2013: August Brings Time to Recall, Reckon and Right “Now is the time to make real the promises of democracy. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to open the doors of opportunity to all of God's children. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood.” — Martin Luther King, Jr. I Have a Dream, 28 August 1963 Continue reading
Posted Aug 3, 2013 at Women's Philanthropy--Women's Issues
Anti-choice lawmakers are trying to ban abortion at 20 weeks, and “Meet the Press” host David Gregory calls their strategy “reasonable?” In just 24 hours, 22,020 of you called on Gregory to stop parroting anti-choice talking points. This is amazing, but we can have even more of an impact if we deliver 25,000 letters. My team is delivering your emails Wednesday at noon so that Gregory and his bosses can’t ignore us – please add your name now so that your voice gets heard. - Ilyse Why is "Meet the Press" host David Gregory repeating anti-choice talking points that 20-week abortion bans are “reasonable?” There’s nothing “reasonable” about anti-choice lawmakers inserting themselves between a woman and her doctor. Tell "Meet the Press:" 20-week abortion bans aren’t “reasonable.” Add your name I’d expect this from Fox News, but not “Meet the Press.” When David Gregory asked Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid about the 20-week abortion ban moving through Congress, Gregory repeatedly referred to this legislative attack as “reasonable.”1 It’s the job of journalists like Gregory to see through these anti-choice talking points – not repeat them. There’s nothing reasonable about anti-choice lawmakers inserting themselves between a woman and her doctor. The way the media report on the 20-week abortion bans is critical, especially as anti-choice lawmakers push these attacks from states like Texas all the way up to the U.S. Congress. Americans trust “Meet the Press.” When this show doesn’t report the news fairly and honestly, Americans come away with only one side of the story and don’t have the facts they need to fight back. We can’t let this interview go without saying something. Tell David Gregory his depiction of 20-week abortion bans is misleading to the millions of Americans who count on him to serve up the facts without bias on “Meet the Press.” Here’s how Gregory put his question: “Is it not reasonable to put some restrictions on late term abortion as we're seeing in the states?" If Gregory had done his research, he’d know that abortion at this point in pregnancy is extremely rare, only 1.5 percent of all abortions.2 These bans target women who face a complication later in pregnancy, such as a heart-breaking diagnosis of a fetal anomaly. When a reporter like Gregory puts anti-choice spin into his story, he makes it that much harder to ensure that people know the truth about how these... Continue reading
Posted Jul 24, 2013 at Women's Philanthropy--Women's Issues
Corporations — Global Issues. Global Issues Social, Political, Economic and Environmental Issues That Affect Us All Corporations Author and Page information by Anup Shah This Page Last Updated Monday, January 07, 2013 This page: http://www.globalissues.org/issue/50/corporations. To print all information e.g. expanded side notes, shows alternative links, use the print version: http://www.globalissues.org/print/issue/50 As the world starts to globalize, it is accompanied by criticism of the current forms of globalization, which are feared to be overly corporate-led. As corporations become larger and multinational, their influence and interests go further accordingly. Being able to influence and own most media companies, it is hard to be able to publicly debate the notions and ideals that corporations pursue. Some choices that corporations take to make profits can affect people all over the world. Sometimes fatally. 13 articles on “Corporations” and 2 related issues: Continue reading
Posted Jul 23, 2013 at Women's Philanthropy--Women's Issues
Video: Anita Roddick: Corporate Social Responsibility? — Global Issues. Summary Anita Roddick looks at the origins of social responsibility in business and questions the integrity of what is now commonly known as Corporate Social Responsibility. Since leading management consultants helped take the movement mainstream, the core values that shape ethical business practices have become compromised in her view. She touches on the power that big business wields over government and closes by suggesting that governments and businesses have become far too obsessed with profit and economic growth. Video DetailsSourceCorporate Social Responsibility?Running time5m 02sFilmedOxford, UK, September 15, 2006CreditsMarcus MorrellAbout Dame Anita RoddickBusiness Entrepreneur Dame Anita Roddick DBE is the founder of The Body Shop and one of Britain’s most successful global retailers. A pioneer of socially responsible business, she has been a tireless campaigner for human rights and trade justice. She has won numerous business, leadership and philanthropic awards and was named Dame Commander of the British Empire in 2003. She has written and contributed to many books, including “Globalization: Take it Personally” (2001) and “Business as Unusual” (2005). Continue reading
Posted Jul 23, 2013 at Women's Philanthropy--Women's Issues
Women’s rights around the world is an important indicator to understand global well-being. Feminization of Poverty The “feminization of poverty” is a phenomenon that is unfortunately on the increase. Basically, women are increasingly the ones who suffer the most poverty. Professor of anthropology, Richard Robbins also notes that At the same time that women produce 75 to 90 percent of food crops in the world, they are responsible for the running of households. According to the United Nations, in no country in the world do men come anywhere close to women in the amount of time spent in housework. Furthermore, despite the efforts of feminist movements, women in the core [wealthiest, Western countries] still suffer disproportionately, leading to what sociologist refer to as the “feminization of poverty,” where two out of every three poor adults are women. The informal slogan of the Decade of Women became “Women do two-thirds of the world’s work, receive 10 percent of the world’s income and own 1 percent of the means of production.” — Richard H. Robbins, Global Problems and the Culture of Capitalism, (Allyn and Bacon, 1999), p. 354 This then also affects children, which makes the dire situation even worse. For example, even in the richest country in the world, the USA, the poorest are women caring for children. The lending strategies to developing countries by institutions such as the IMF and World Bank have affected many women in those countries. Poverty, trade and economic issues are very much related to women’s rights issues due to the impacts they can have. Tackling these issues as well also helps to tackle women’s rights issues. And, tackling gender issues helps tackle poverty-related issues. See also the Asia Pacific online network of women web site for more about issues relating to globalization and its impacts on women. For more about these aspects, refer to this site’s section on trade and poverty related issues. http://www.globalissues.org/article/166/womens-rights#FeminizationofPoverty Continue reading
Posted Jul 23, 2013 at Women's Philanthropy--Women's Issues
Global Issues Social, Political, Economic and Environmental Issues That Affect Us All Women’s Rights Author and Page information by Anup Shah This Page Last Updated Sunday, March 14, 2010 This page: http://www.globalissues.org/article/166/womens-rights. To print all information e.g. expanded side notes, shows alternative links, use the print version: http://www.globalissues.org/print/article/166 Women’s rights around the world is an important indicator to understand global well-being. A major global women’s rights treaty was ratified by the majority of the world’s nations a few decades ago. Yet, despite many successes in empowering women, numerous issues still exist in all areas of life, ranging from the cultural, political to the economic. For example, women often work more than men, yet are paid less; gender discrimination affects girls and women throughout their lifetime; and women and girls are often are the ones that suffer the most poverty. Many may think that women’s rights are only an issue in countries where religion is law, such as many Muslim countries. Or even worse, some may think this is no longer an issue at all. But reading this report about the United Nation’s Women’s Treaty and how an increasing number of countries are lodging reservations, will show otherwise. Gender equality furthers the cause of child survival and development for all of society, so the importance of women’s rights and gender equality should not be underestimated. http://www.globalissues.org/article/166/womens-rights Continue reading
Posted Jul 23, 2013 at Women's Philanthropy--Women's Issues
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The Female Factor The Internationalization of Women's Issues By LUISITA LOPEZ TORREGROSA Published: January 8, 2013 NEW YORK — At the dawn of this new year, a note of cautious optimism is rising from female leaders, activists and advocates who are anticipating major new strides as “women issues” go global. “Women issues are world issues,” Michelle Bachelet, the executive director of U.N. Women and former president of Chile, said recently. “Today there is greater awareness than ever before that women’s full participation is essential for peace, democracy and sustainable development.” At the same time, Alyse Nelson, chief executive of Vital Voices Global Partnership, a nongovernmental organization that trains and empowers emerging female leaders and social entrepreneurs around the globe, noted that “the pace and nature of globalization have worn away the distinction between ‘women’s issues’ and global issues. In 2013, women who find real solutions and leverage their leadership to empower others will rise to the international stage in increasing numbers — and not because they’re women. I believe these women are the vanguard of a new era of global leadership.” A universal vision seems at work here: Elect more women as heads of state and government (there are only 21 worldwide) and to parliaments, and promote more women to corporate boards and executive positions; advance and empower women in the developed and developing world; close the gender pay gap; and improve workplace conditions. Meantime, violence against women, a central focus of U.N. Women’s agenda, has exploded as a world issue. “In some countries, up to 7 in 10 women will be beaten, raped, abused, or mutilated during their lifetimes,” Ms. Bachelet said. “There can be no peace, no progress, when women live under the fear of violence.” Indeed, Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani student shot by Taliban attackers after she spoke up on behalf of girls’ education, has become a global symbol, renewing efforts to protect schoolgirls in extreme patriarchal societies. India, the world’s largest democracy, was put on notice that women would not be silent anymore. Thousands of people have joined female demonstrators against government and police mishandling of rape cases and insensitivity to women in general. Large protests over a fatal gang rape became front-page news around the world, and protesters, led by women, demanded stronger laws against rape, sexual harassment and child abuse. With the globalization of women’s issues, world organizations are drumming up the support of... Continue reading
Posted Jul 23, 2013 at Women's Philanthropy--Women's Issues
She The People Politics and Culture with Melinda Henneberger Economic issues are women’s issues By Melinda Henneberger, Published: July 19 I’ve often wondered how much further American women would be along by now on all kinds of important matters — equal pay, more child care, and less sexual assault, to name a few — if we hadn’t put so much of our collective energies into an endless (and for both lobbies, highly lucrative) abortion fight in which public opinion is as divided now as in the ’70s — and women remain as divided as men. (U.S. House of Representatives) So I was glad to see House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and other Democratic women in Congress do something radical this week, even if nothing comes of it right away. Though it didn’t get much attention, they launched an initiative focused solely on the economic issues that impact women and families: Pay equity, sick leave, and child care. Again, this isn’t important because long overdue legislation on any of the above is going to move any minute now: In the Republican-controlled House, there’s no chance of that. But basic pocketbook issues are so seldom seen as high on the list of feminist concerns that some of the women journalists invited to a briefing on the initiative in Pelosi’s office on Thursday needed a minute to process where the former speaker and her colleagues were headed, putting forward a women’s agenda that didn’t even mention abortion rights. Were the problems on the table here — lower pay and lousy child care — part of the Republican war on women, one writer asked, looking for some familiar footing. Could be, Pelosi answered, but that wasn’t the focus of this particular initiative: “We are prioritizing here.” So, another reporter wondered, the complete lack of focus on recent restriction of abortion rights was a conscious decision, then? Yes, Pelosi answered. I don’t see anything about sexual harassment in the handouts, another observed. “And you’re not going to see it,” Pelosi said. “What we’re saying here is respect for the value of work [done by women] has to be recognized. I don’t want to trivialize this core disrespect for women in the work place…by pinning every other issue on it. It’s not to say that something else isn’t important; it’s to say halt, this has got to stop.” ‘This,’ being the fact that, yes, women are... Continue reading
Posted Jul 23, 2013 at Women's Philanthropy--Women's Issues
Join the great suffrage pilgrimage One hundred years ago, 50,000 suffragists marched to a rally in Hyde Park from all corners of England and Wales. This summer, dozens of walks are taking place to celebrate their achievements Kira Cochrane guardian.co.uk, Thursday 11 July 2013 08.00 EDT Suffragists in 1913. Photograph: Hulton-Deutsch Collection/Corbis The photograph shows a group of women and children gathering behind a banner, announcing their journey from Land's End to London. The women wear hats and sashes, pavement-skimming skirts, redoubtable expressions; three clutch bicycles, prepared to zoom off. A donkey stands glumly to one side. It looks like a very British day out. It was much more than that. Natalie McGrath, an Exeter-based playwright, first saw this image in 2008, while leafing through the programme for Her Naked Skin, Rebecca Lenkiewicz's play about the suffragettes (the first play by a woman to be performed on the main stage of the National Theatre). She was immediately intrigued. She started researching the picture, and the event it recorded – a pilgrimage made by the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies (NUWSS), who were on the non-militant side of the suffrage movement. The pilgrimage started in mid-June 1913, and ended with a mass rally of 50,000 in Hyde Park five weeks later on 26 July. Very little seemed to have been written about it, but trawling through local newspapers, she began to piece the story together. This was a time of great ferment for the suffrage campaign. Emily Wilding Davison had become a very public martyr for the cause at the start of June, when she was struck by the King's horse Anmer during the Epsom Derby, dying of her injuries four days later. The militants had long been organising outrages up and down the UK – they treated human life as absolutely sacrosanct, but set fire to postboxes and the empty summer houses of the super-rich, and went on major window-smashing expeditions. During this period, for instance, the author Fran Abrams has written: "on two separate days, at a preordained time and with no warning, hundreds of smartly dressed women from Oxford Street to Whitehall, all along Piccadilly and Bond Street, produced hammers from their muffs and laid waste to hundreds of square feet of shop frontage. Emmeline [Pankhurst] was arrested along with a total of 220 other protesters." The militants were prepared for everything that was thrown at them... Continue reading
Posted Jul 23, 2013 at Women's Philanthropy--Women's Issues
Women Top Story India's acid attack ruling risks rubbing salt into survivors' wounds KumKum Dasgupta: Survivors are demanding free treatment or more compensation to pay for surgery that can cost thousands Continue reading
Posted Jul 23, 2013 at Women's Philanthropy--Women's Issues
The African villages declaring an end to female genital mutilation NGO Tostan is empowering people in west Africa to understand their human rights and encouraging them to abandon FGM Liz Ford guardian.co.uk, Wednesday 5 December 2012 09.27 EST Jump to comments (17) Female genital mutilation: education can empower women and girls Link to video: Female genital mutilation: education can empower women and girls Molly Melching will travel to Guinea-Bissau this month to witness a milestone moment. Villages in the west African state with which Melching's organisation, Tostan, has been working, will make public declarations of their intention to live according to the principles of human rights. And by doing so, they promise to end the practice of female genital mutilation (FGM), a practice prevalent in at least 28 African countries. The declarations follow three years of education and discussion in families, villages and wider communities about people's rights, specifically the rights of women and girls, and what they mean for future wellbeing. They are a mark in the sand; a declaration that the village will no longer tolerate practices deemed to be harmful, and will sanction those who participate in them. "It's a big declaration," says Melching, in London this week to speak at the Trust Women conference, organised by the Thomson Reuters Foundation and the International Herald Tribune. "Three and a half years ago, people believed so strongly in the practice [FGM], but in the space of three years, the community came together and are holding a declaration of human rights, saying we will own them and apply them." Guinea-Bissau is one of eight African countries in which Tostan runs community empowerment projects. Local people are trained to run sessions on human rights in their villages and encourage people to talk and eventually take the issues on board. But the process doesn't end with a village declaration of intent. People are encouraged to share what they have learned with family and friends who live in other villages – to spread the word so it sticks. "To make real change you have to go beyond the community and go to the social network. It's not limited to a village," says Melching. "You have in-laws in other communities, you have to identify people who matter or you can never bring about sustained change." Without this outreach, she says, there is a danger that a mother-in-law living in another village will not... Continue reading
Posted Jul 23, 2013 at Women's Philanthropy--Women's Issues
125 million mutilated women and girls A report from Unicef shows the true extent of FGM and reveals that in many countries both men and women would like it to stop • The facts about female genital mutilation – interactive 'Every time they're doing a cutting, the singing gets louder so you can't hear the screaming.' Sarian, now in her 30s, was mutilated at 11. Photograph: Martin Godwin for the Guardian The true extent of female genital mutilation or cutting is huge and revealed on Monday in a report from Unicef (pdf). It says a total of 125 million women and girls are now living with the consequences of FGM – and yet the report suggests that the practice continues only because of social convention, while most women and men wish it would end. There are 29 countries in Africa where FGM is now practised but over half the girls who are cut live in just three – Egypt, Ethiopia and Nigeria. It may surprise many people to learn that cutting is highly prevalent in Egypt. The report says 91% of girls in Egypt are cut, most of them – 77% – by a medical professional, which indicates how much of an establishment practice it is, and raises ethical questions of the doctors and nurses involved. There are 27.2 million women and girls in Egypt who have been through FGM. In terms of the percentage of girl who are cut, Egypt is in fourth place, below Somalia on 98%, Guinea on 96% and Djibouti on 93%. At the bottom end of the scale, in Uganda and Cameroon, just 1% of girls are cut. In more than half the 29 countries studied, Unicef says FGM is becoming slightly less common – in Kenya and Tanzania, the older generation of 45- to 49-year-old women are three times more likely to have undergone FGM than today's 15- and 16-year-olds. But there are places where it seems still entrenched. The report says: No significant changes in female genital mutilation/cutting prevalence among girls and women aged 15-49 can be observed in Chad, Djibouti, the Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Mali, Senegal, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen. Unicef has found there is strong support for ending FGM both among women and among men. In most countries where FGM/C is practised, the majority of girls and women think it should end. Moreover, the percentage of females who support the practice is... Continue reading
Posted Jul 23, 2013 at Women's Philanthropy--Women's Issues
Noam Chomsky: The Corporatization of the University (2013) by dandelionsalad Dandelion Salad with Noam Chomsky Isaac Epstein on Jul 14, 2013 July 12, 2013. Rackham Auditorium, University of Michigan Sponsored by: GEO, LEO, MI-AAUP Lead Organizer: Jim McAsey Videographer: Isaac Epstein Read more of this post Continue reading
Posted Jul 23, 2013 at Women's Philanthropy--Women's Issues
Casting Out Demons by Chris Hedges by dandelionsalad by Chris Hedges Writer, Dandelion Salad Truthdig July 22, 2013 Noel Lyons, a member of the U.S. Ski Team from 1976 to 1981 and once one of the country’s top professional skiers, found herself in a Vail, Colo., hospital in the spring of 2010 after another round of binge drinking. “I had given up on […] Read more of this post Continue reading
Posted Jul 23, 2013 at Women's Philanthropy--Women's Issues
Chris Hedges: The Radical Movements Have Been Destroyed, Part 5 by dandelionsalad with Chris Hedges Writer, Dandelion Salad July 22, 2013 TheRealNews on Jul 22, 2013 On Reality Asserts Itself with Paul Jay, Chris Hedges says The Democratic Party used to watch out for the interests of labor and even for the poor. But that all changed under Bill Clinton. Although Obama, like Clinton, continues to speak […] Read more of this post Continue reading
Posted Jul 23, 2013 at Women's Philanthropy--Women's Issues
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Do you know the next steps to take with your major donors? Today's video is a bit more like a mini workshop, complete with a free handout you can download! :) It can be difficult to figure out what the next step is when you are trying to deepen a major donor relationship. In today's video, you'll learn about seven different donor archetypes and how to use them. You'll also learn about the "donor strategy worksheet" which you can download, and you'll here a mini case study about a woman who was stuck with what to do next with a major donor. She used what you are about to learn and came up with a fantastic next step for engagement. Here's the link to the video: http://moviemondays.com/donorworksheet If you're looking to bring in new donors to your organization, then check out "100 Donors in 90 Days". It'll give you a step by step road map to bringing in new donors for your organization. And this week you can save 25%. Check it out here: http://www.100donorsin90days.com/ Have a terrific week. Chris 501 Videos, LLC, 19689 7th Ave NE #341, Poulsbo, WA 98370, USA Continue reading
Posted Jul 23, 2013 at Women's Philanthropy--Women's Issues
22 July 2013 Women Deliver is proud to announce a HUGE accomplishment! Just nine months ago, Women Deliver launched Catapult, a groundbreaking crowdfunding platform dedicated to advancing the lives of girls and women. Thanks to an innovative partnership with CHIME FOR CHANGE, a new campaign founded by GUCCI, 210 projects for girls' and women's rights have already been funded in 81 different countries. They turned the $3.9 million (after VAT) in funds raised by GUCCI’s June 1 London benefit concert THE SOUND OF CHANGE LIVE into real impact for 84 organizations. This is a great example of how innovative collaborations can work, and how we can achieve real and measureable results for girls and women when we share values -- and when we act on those shared values. We want to recognize and congratulate the effort and commitment by all of the amazing NGO partners who worked so hard to create excellent, detailed and compelling projects for the Catapult platform. Read a blog post from Jill Sheffield and Maz Kessler to learn more about Catapult, and check out the results: Want to get involved? Join Jill Sheffield's team and help raise money for girls and women! Two out of three of Jill's favorite projects have already been fully funded (congrats!), and we just need a little help to get the third project to 100%. And keep visiting Catapult to see new projects launching every day! Continue reading
Posted Jul 23, 2013 at Women's Philanthropy--Women's Issues
Join Us for an Exclusive Webinar Hosted by Emerge America Girls Just Wanna Not Run: The Gender Gap in Young Americans' Political Ambition featuring Jennifer L. Lawless Professor of Government, American University and Richard L. Fox Professor of Political Science, Loyola Marymount Univsersity Wednesday, July 24, 2013 3 PM EST RSVP HERE The mission of the Women & Politics Institute is to close the gender gap in political leadership. We provide young women with academic and practical training that encourages them to become involved in the political process, and we facilitate research that enhances our understanding of the challenges women face in the political arena. American University's Women & Politics Institute | 4400 Massachusetts Ave, NW | Washington, DC 20016 | United States Continue reading
Posted Jul 23, 2013 at Women's Philanthropy--Women's Issues
Monday 22 July 2013 To contribute to Resource Net "Jobs", please write to contribute@awid.org. Please allow at least three days for us to consider your request. Items that arrive too late to be included in the newsletter, will be posted to www.awid.org. AWID Membership Change doesn't just happen. We collectively make it happen. By becoming a member of AWID, you are joining a movement that seeks to advance the rights of women around the world as you connect with other individuals and organizations that are committed to building our collective voice, power and influence in achieving full equality of women and human rights of all people. Find out more Quick Links to AWID's Website Women's Rights Information Coordinator (French) Internship Gender Specialist, PROGRESS Organization/Lead Consultant Gender and Humanitarian Action Adviser Global Development Policy Internship Organizational Advancement Internship Communications and Outreach Internship Global Partnerships Internship Gender Officer Technical Adviser VAW Qualitative Research Programs and Policy Intern Technical Legal Consultant on Gender Sensitive Legal Frameworks Project Manager - Young Urban Women Project Poverty Economist, Gender Unit Sign up! Join us! Follow us on Facebook & Twitter AWID RESOURCE-NET JOBS Women's Rights Information Coordinator (French) / The Association for Women's Rights in Development (AWID) / Location: Francophone Africa (preferred, but flexible) / Closing date: August 4, 2013. The WRI Coordinator is a full-time position responsible for planning, researching and producing information on a wide range of women's rights issues; coordinating content production, dissemination and related activities; actively building and engaging with AWID's Francophone constituency; and more. Read more Internship / The NGO Committee on the Status of Women, NY (NGO CSW/NY) / New York, NY, USA / Closing date: September 1, 2013. Interns will be assigned to assist the Committee in the preparation of various events and provide support to the NGO CSW/NY office for the upcoming NGO CSW Forum 2014 and UN Commission on the Status of Women session. Read more Gender Specialist, PROGRESS / Social Impact / South Sudan/ Closing date: August 31, 2013. Social Impact seeks a candidate to serve as a full-time South Sudanese national Gender Specialist for the Project on Good Governance in the Republic of South Sudan (PROGRESS). Read more Organization/Lead Consultant / The International Center for Research on Women (ICRW) / Urban Dhaka, Bangladesh / Closing date: July 23, 2013. ICRW is seeking proposals from organizations, institutions or agencies to design, manage, administer and process a... Continue reading
Posted Jul 23, 2013 at Women's Philanthropy--Women's Issues
FGM, Amartya Sen, and a new job for Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka Where is FGM carried out and who supports it? Plus we discuss India with a Nobel prizewinner and UN Women gets a new head Liz Ford guardian.co.uk, Tuesday 23 July 2013 07.59 EDT Kenyan schoolgirls during an anti-female genital mutilation event in Kilgoris in 2007. Photograph: Sayyid Azim/AP This week, Unicef published what it describes as the most comprehensive set of data and analysis on the prevalence of female genital mutilation (FGM) in Africa and the Middle East. The data focuses on the 29 countries where the practice is most common. We've put these figures into an interactive, showing the percentage of FGM prevalence in these countries, the majority of which are in west Africa, along with other facts and figures contained in Unicef's report, which used more than 70 national surveys conducted over 20 years. Elsewhere on the site Madeleine Bunting spoke to Nobel prize-winning economist Amartya Sen (video) about India's need to rethink its development priorities. Dan Griliopoulos investigated how video game developers in the global south can improve their skills and go viral. Mary Goudie asked why no one is following the $32bn money trail generated from modern-day slavery. And UN Women announced South Africa's Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka as its new head: look out for David Smith's forthcoming interview with her. Development achievement award The Guardian's annual award is open for nominations. Find out more and nominate the person you think has made an exceptional contribution to alleviating poverty in the developing world. The closing date is 5 August 2013. Multimedia Our best galleries from the past fortnight … • Gorilla bean harvest in the Democratic Republic of the Congo Protein-rich gorilla beans have been bred to target malnutrition in DRC's North and South Kivu provinces. Much of the scientific research into the purple and white kidney-shaped pulses has been conducted by African research institutions. • Central African Republic's healthcare crisis Political turmoil following a March coup has created a healthcare crisis. Hospitals have been looted and staff have fled, leaving an already vulnerable population with no access to medical care. Médecins sans Frontières has scaled up its presence in an attempt to ease the situation. Coming up On Thursday, the Guardian is running a special report on the Syrian refugee crisis. Look out for a datablog on who's pledging aid, a report on mental healthcare for refugees,... Continue reading
Posted Jul 23, 2013 at Women's Philanthropy--Women's Issues