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thanks for these recommendations. i'm sad to not see "nudge" on the list. it's a book i return to to challenge my thinking about how i'm approaching communication and how my clients are approaching design. i'm also looking forward to the heath's new book: "switch." f
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knowing that it's for a job fair makes a big difference. the sheer grossness of the image and its juxtaposition with all of the other staid corp literature will bring people directly to you. who wouldn't want to check out the org that puts this type of material out? it says: we're offbeat, we don't take ourselves too seriously, and we aren't afraid to take some risks. if your culture stands up to it, pick it (had to). i hope you follow-up with the hiring letter that says "we picked you because you're tasty." f
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how about zoe as director of diversity? she speaks well about same and different: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fgfmcAYuAj8
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hey kris, boy, does this post resonate with me. i had the exact same conversation, woman to woman, as in that bw article. personally, i like a leader who gives up that head of the table seat and sits in the middle, showing their willingness to listen. f
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hi, greg. i think you're right on. i worked with beth gleba and jen benz to create a twitter account for ikea and their open enrollment, and they continue to use the account more broadly. jen wrote a great article about our work: http://bit.ly/NdL5G one benefit you didn't mention is how twitter reaches audiences beyond employees, such as family members and potential recruits. spouses are often heavily involved in benefits enrollment decisions and family members are high users of benefits. being able to reach, educate, and support them is key to a good benefits program. and we all know how much benefits and culture play into our decision to take a job or not, especially nowadays! be interested to hear what others think! f
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paul, as you knew, i'd have to comment on this one. a complementary perspective to your idea is the science of procrastination and how that plays into our deciding to make a change. how it goes for most of us: sure, i could go to the gym and avoid that heart attack, but i'm not likely to have one 'til i'm in my 50s, even 60s. i'll plop on the couch today and go tomorrow. what's the harm? i also think we need to acknowledge it's a tough road because of other complicating factors -- access to healthy, inexpensive food, places to run and play, and marketing-free playgrounds, among many other things. we don't exist in a vacuum, but wellness programs often operate in one. and last, i've seen the "biggest loser" reaction from employees who have had shocking wake-up calls after completing a company-requested health risk assessment. yet, because of the unavoidable coupling with the workplace and despite HIPAA protections, these assessments are almost always viewed with skepticism and fear. another tough, tough hill to overcome. good post. good conversation. thanks, f
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some guru. i just saw my type-o on "company's" instead of "companies" .... f
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so, paul....for me, that boils down to the notion that company's need to care and act with integrity to succeed. and that these traits give them the wherewithal to stick with hard, perceived as risky or counterintuitive choices. and it's *this* that really makes the difference. f (p.s. i like the dan pink presentation. nice alternative option...keep with it!)
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