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Well done ceanirminger what fun! Yes please, can we have the link to the full results?
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Thank you Yvonne! I'm completely thrilled to win. Thank you to everyone who voted for me.
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Wow these are all fantastic designs and I thought the Birds on a Wire one would come top! Please could we have the link to the rest of the results again? Thanks...
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Fabulous winner. Might we be allowed to see the rest of the voting results please?
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From the Spoonflower contests FAQ: 'All submitted designs must be your own (you cannot nominate other people's designs or use designs based upon other people's work)' OK so this seems obvious. No plagiarism. Completely get it. But do I? It all comes down to that little phrase 'based on'. What does this mean? Clearly we can't copy and paste someone else's work into our own, unless it is public domain. But say we want to include a picture of a horse in our design, and we get a photo off the internet, and draw a copy of the horse? Is this plagiarism? Should we have gone and taken our own photo of a horse? Imagine we want to make a fabric using repeats of a snowflake that is microscopic in real life. Do we have to collect the snowflake, create cold enough conditions to preserve it, put it in a petri dish, view it and photograph it through a microscope, or is it ok to look at pictures on the internet or copy something from a book or National Geographic? So let's imagine it's ok to look at pictures on the internet, what kind of pictures is it ok to look at? Is it worse to copy someone else's line drawing than it is to copy someone else's photograph. Where do we draw the line (pun not intended)? Is copying something by eye ok when copying something using a photocopier or scanner is not? What if we were to copy by hand a part of a drawing or painting but alter it in some way - in terms of colour or medium or through changing the direction of some of the lines...? Is this OK? I'd be interested in a debate about this one. Any opinions anyone?
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Might it be possible as part of the childrens' clothes prints competition to allow designers to submit two co-ordinating fabrics? Or perhaps this is one for a future competition theme...
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I really enjoyed having colour restrictions for the last one, as I think that restrictions make things more creative - they make me think 'outside of the box'. I also like the comments about doing things perhaps with a hand-done, painterly quality. Here are my ideas: Purely geometric - no representational artwork allowed Stained glass windows as inspiration Something based on a historical culture for it's inspiration - for example: Egyptian art Renaissance patterns Greek architecture I'm sure there are many more to think of! Rachael I like your peacocks idea I have already done one of those and so have a few other people!
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