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Hello, Norman Ontario vital statistics (civil registrations of births, marriages and deaths) are administered at a provincial level, not a municipal level, so there are no records in Toronto City Hall, etc. Here is the link to the Archives of Ontario Guide 202, which explains the availability of records. http://www.archives.gov.on.ca/en/access/research_guides.aspx You will see that for marriages from 1938 to the present, you must fill out an application, to be sent to the Registrar General in Thunder Bay. There is a fee for this service.
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The Toronto Telegram microfilm is located in the Toronto Star Newspaper Room, on the basement level of Toronto Reference Library. https://www.torontopubliclibrary.ca/torontoreferencelibrary/
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Hello, Geoff The library pays for these digitized newspaper subscriptions, which are provided by an external company, Proquest, and often there are conditions that limit access to library members. We do have a fee-based research service, called Intellisearch which might be of assistance. For details see http://www.torontopubliclibrary.ca/intellisearch/
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Hi Mercedes, As we have mentioned at the beginning of this blog post, you should not reveal personal information on this blog. We will reply to your question in a private e-mail.
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Hello, Vince This blog provides information for conducting historical genealogical research. I will reply to your message in a private e-mail.
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Hello, Dessa As we have mentioned at the beginning of this blog post, you should not reveal personal information on this blog. I will reply to your question in a private e-mail.
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As you will read in the guide, Ontario death registrations have not been made public for the 1950's. You can try contacting the London & Middlesex County Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Association for further assistance: https://londonmiddlesex.ogs.on.ca/
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You can try contacting the Hamilton Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society: http://www.ogs.on.ca/hamilton/
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As you will read in the guide, the Ontario Government has only released death registration records up to the 1940's, so it is not an 'easy thing' in Ontario.
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Your search for a living relative is referred to as 'tracing forward.' Unfortunately, the resources mentioned in this guide will not help you with your search.
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Birth records for Ontario (which includes Toronto) have only been released to the public up to 1915. Please see the Archives of Ontario guide to Vital Statistics for further information.
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Hello, I have sent you a reply directly to your e-mail.
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Hello, Lucy I have sent you a reply directly to your e-mail.
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Hello, Susan. I have sent you a reply directly to your e-mail.
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Unfortunately the Telegram (1876-1971) has never been digitized and is not online, except for some Telegram photos which have been digitized by York University. See details of Telegram availability in this blog post: http://deantiquate.blog.yorku.ca/2012/05/13/torontotelegram_preservedwithhelpofcca/ Toronto Reference Library has a complete set of Telegram microfilm.
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The genealogy and local history collection housed in the Canadiana Department at the North York Central Library was recently transferred downtown to the Toronto Reference Library’s Humanities and Social Sciences Department (HSS). This included a variety of materials in different formats: genealogical periodicals church and parish histories historical atlases city... Continue reading
Posted Jun 2, 2016 at Local History & Genealogy
Hello. We have just sent a detailed reply directly to your email which may help you, though we did not find the death record you wanted. Good luck with your research.
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Our library system does have one book on St Armand Methodist church registers,http://www.torontopubliclibrary.ca/detail.jsp?Entt=RDM1468747&R=1468747, but it only goes to 1836. Couldn't find any other relevant publications. However at North York Central and at the Toronto Reference Library we do have another database, Quebec Records.com which has the Drouin records and the image is clearer than on Ancestry. It is possible to make out most, but not 100% of the marriage record you want. Are you in the Toronto area that you could come in? Will also reply directly to your email with some more details.
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As you are seeking information on a living person, born fairly recently, there is little that a library can do, as the information you seek is not public. If the birth mother is still alive, then she would be able to request the necessary information. As a "sibling of a birth parent", all you would be able to obtain from the Ontario government is "non-identifying information". Suggest you consult the following website. http://www.ontario.ca/government/search-adoption-records for further details."
Toggle Commented Jun 20, 2015 on Adoption Records at Local History & Genealogy
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Hello Bernie. Wishing to help your grandmother is very understandable. However, like the response above on April 22, this is a search for a living person. The marriage information on the couple in question will not be public. IF you have the last and first names of the couple, and IF they lived in Toronto, you could try a city directory search which would take you up only to 2001. Or try https://411.ca/person for a telephone number.
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Hello. As a genealogy department we primarily assist patrons with tracing persons who are deceased, as records are not made public for some time. For instance, in the library, we only have access to Ontario death records up to 1939. From both your query and the earlier one you refer to, it would seem that you are searching for a living person. Your best bet might be to try a telephone site like 411.ca for the Mississauga area and search for your Mr. James. https://411.ca/whitepages/Ontario/Mississauga/J A check of the Halton-Peel Regions Criss Cross Directory for 2001 (latest city directory available for Mississauga) did not find a listing for Barrington or George or George B or GB James. If you are in the Toronto area, you could come into a library branch and try searching for the name in the Toronto Star and Globe and Mail newspaper databases. Otherwise you might have to hire an agency to try to trace him.
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Thank you for your comments. Unfortunately, poor quality images are a known issue with the Globe and TPL has been raising this problem with the vendor, Proquest. It is out of the library's control. Meanwhile an alternative is to visit a library that carries the Globe on microfilm, such as North York Central or Toronto Reference Library. You may also be able to improve PDF images, according to some users, if you have access to something like Photoshop. https://forums.adobe.com/thread/1010936
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The Toronto Public Library Digital Archive is a rich source of Toronto history. From the time an item in the collection is selected for digitization to when it is available in the Toronto Public Library Digital Archive, it undergoes an in-depth process to ensure it is accessible to everyone searching... Continue reading
Posted Mar 25, 2015 at Local History & Genealogy
Hello Marcia. Thanks for writing. We will reply to you directly via email.
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Hello Theo. While gratifying to know that our research advice is being read in Europe, I regret having to disappoint you. The library pays for these digitized newspaper subscriptions and often there are conditions that limit access to library members. We do have a fee-based research service, called Intellisearch which might be of assistance. For details see http://www.torontopubliclibrary.ca/intellisearch/ You might also want to go the the Globe directly via some kind of subscription at http://www.theglobeandmail.com/static/globeproducts/globe-subscriptions.html You can also search birth and deaths back to about 1998 at e.g. http://v1.theglobeandmail.com/life/deaths/ You mention that your local library does not have the Globe and Mail. However, should it be an option for you, an academic library might have it, either in microfilm or as part of a database with other newspapers. Good luck.
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